Lower East Side

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Lower East Side

Rendering of 115 Delancey Street via Handel Architects

Applications are now being accepted for 98 mixed-income apartments located at 115 Delancey Street, known as site two of the sprawling nine-site Essex Crossing Development. The 26-story tower is the tallest building on the $1.9 billion complex and will host the Essex Street Market and a 14-screen Regal Cinemas Theater. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 40, 60, 120 and 165 percent of the area median income can apply for units ranging from a studio for $519/month to a three-bedroom for $3,424/month.

Find out if you qualify

Lower East Side, Major Developments, Rentals

Legendary jazz saxophonist and New York City native Sonny Rollins lived in an apartment on the Lower East Side home for many years during the late 1950s. Although the building he called home has long been demolished, the sprawling development rising on the same site, Essex Crossing, will pay tribute to the iconic artist by naming one of the buildings after him. The Rollins, a 15-story rental building at 145 Clinton Street, sits near the entrance of the Williamsburg Bridge, a spot where Rollins practiced every day for two years. As the New York Times reported, the Rollins, designed by Beyer Blinder Belle, will include 107 market-rate apartments, which start at $3,150 for a studio, $4,450 for a one-bedroom, $5,800 for a two-bedroom and $8,450 for a three-bedroom. Leasing will begin in January for these market-rate units.

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Chinatown, Lower East Side, Policy

247 cherry street

Rendering of 247 Cherry Street via SHoP Architects

In an effort to slow construction of three residential towers in the Two Bridges neighborhood, City Council Member Margaret Chin and Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer will submit an application to the Department of City Planning that forces the plan to go through the city’s land use review process. Developments at the waterfront site include a 1,000+ foot tower from JDS Development Group, a 1.1 million-square-foot development from L+M Development and CIM Group, and a 724-foot rental building from Starrett Development. According to Politico, the Manhattan pols hope the review process will encourage public scrutiny of the projects, including a demand for shorter structures.

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affordable housing, housing lotteries, Lower East Side

242 Broome Street, SHoP Architects, Essex Crossing

242 Broome Street rendering via SHoP Architects

A high-end condo in a SHoP Architects-designed building on the hip Lower East Side for just $224,000? Yep, you read that right, and this middle-income lottery is now live for mega-development Essex Crossing‘s 242 Broome. The only one of the development’s 10 towers to offer condos, 242 Broome will have a total of 55 residential units, 11 of which are available to households earning no more than 125 percent of the area median income and range from $224,861 one-bedrooms to $331,703 three-bedrooms (quite the deal considering market-rate units are going from $1.3 to $7 million). In addition to amenities like a roof deck, gym, and entertainment lounge, the 14-story building will also include a five-story base with retail and commercial tenants including The International Center of Photography Museum and Splitsville Luxury Lanes Bowling Alley.

Find out if you qualify

Lower East Side, New Developments

landmark sunshine cinema, lower east side theater

Photo of the Landmark Sunshine Cinema, courtesy of Wikimedia

Plans to demolish the Landmark Sunshine Cinema, a staple of the Lower East Side since 1909, were filed with the city Wednesday. Although the new owners of the historic theater, East End Capital and K Property Group, planned in May to redevelop the space as a mixed-use building with retail and office space, the developers, who paid about $35 million for the site, have changed their mind, the Lo-Down reports. The demolition application calls for a “full demolition of a 3-story commercial building.” The iconic cinema’s doors will close for good in January 2018, when its lease expires.

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affordable housing, Architecture, Lower East Side

140 Essex Street, Essex Crossing, Beyer Blinder Belle

New rendering of 140 Essex Street courtesy of Beyer Blinder Belle

Thanks to a $34 million loan from Wells Fargo, Delancey Street Associates closed last week on financing the construction of a 100 percent affordable senior building at 140 Essex Street, site 8 of the 1.9 million-square-foot Essex Crossing development. Originally, the project called for an 80/20 condo building, but developers decided to add 61 more affordable units to the building, bringing the number of affordable rentals at the Lower East Side complex to 561 out of 1,078 total units. Designed by Beyer Blinder Belle, the building at 140 Essex will rise 8 stories and include 92 affordable homes for seniors earning between 0 and 60 percent of the area median income, as well as 9,600 square feet of retail on the ground floor. Construction will begin soon, with an expected opening date sometime in 2019.

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affordable housing, housing lotteries, Lower East Side

229 Cherry Street, Extell Development, Dattner Architects

Rendering of 229 Cherry Street, via Extell Development

The housing lottery for Extell Development’s affordable housing building in the Lower East Side has officially launched. The 13-story development at 229 Cherry Street and sits right next to the group’s amenity-filled, luxury condo, One Manhattan Square. Designed by Dattner Architects, residents at 229 Cherry Street will have access to a landscaped terrace, fitness center and a lounge. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 60 percent of the area median income can apply for $947 per month studios, $1,017 per month one-bedrooms and $1,230 per month two-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Lower East Side

Dramatic historic details elevate this mezzanine loft in the Forward Building at 175 East Broadway, one of the Lower East Side/Two Bridges neighborhood’s most coveted pre-war apartment buildings, as well as being one of its most interesting landmarks. Designed in the Beaux-Arts style, the building is the former headquarters of the Jewish Daily Forward newspaper–previously Forverts, founded in 1897 by a group of Yiddish-speaking socialists. This unique two-bedroom home–it was owned by actress Tatum O’Neal from 2006 to 2013 when she sold it for $1.72 million–asking $2.495 million, boasts a dramatic original decorative plaster ceiling dome with a sunburst centerpiece in the living room; both of its bedrooms have an original stained glass window.

Take a peek inside this unusual residence

Architecture, Design, Lower East Side

essex crossing, cetraruddy, lower east side

Rendering of Essex Crossing’s second phase, courtesy of Moso Studio via Curbed NY

Construction continues to progress at Essex Crossing, the roughly 1.9 million-square-foot mixed-use development planned to stretch several blocks on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. The site, also known as the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area, sat abandoned since 1967 until the city sold the nine sites to developers in 2013. While construction of the first phase of the massive project, which includes sites one, two, five and six, is underway, Curbed has acquired renderings for the development’s second phase, sites three and four. The third and fourth sites will be designed by CetraRuddy and Handel Architects, respectively, and feature residential, retail, office and outdoor space.

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History, Lower East Side

cat hospital, cat lady, nyc history

Image courtesy of New York by Gaslight via Ephemeral New York

Before cat sanctuaries existed in New York City, one woman, in particular, may have been responsible for saving many kittens from the harshness of 19th-century city life. In the 1870s, a woman named Rosalie Goodman lived in a run-down home on Division Street on the Lower East Side. While she rented out most of the home’s bedrooms to tenants, she left two rooms for her family and her roughly 50 cats (h/t Ephemeral New York). In an article from 1878, the New York Tribune wrote, “Lying in the closets, on the tables, and under the stove, were cats of all descriptions. Some had broken limbs or missing eyes, the result probably of prowling around at night.”

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