Lower East Side

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Lower East Side

Essex Crossing Site 5, 145 Clinton Street, Beyer Blinder Belle (1)

It’s been almost exactly a year since Beyer Blinder Belle released renderings of Essex Crossing‘s site 5, a $110 million, 15-story mixed-use building that will give way to 73,000 square feet of retail space, where Trader Joes and Planet Fitness will move in, and a 15,000-square-foot adjacent park. Located just a block southwest of the Manhattan entrance of the Williamsburg Bridge at 145 Clinton Street, it will have 211 rental units, half of which will be reserved for low- and middle-income individuals. These 104 affordable apartments are now available through the city’s online housing lottery, the first of the mega-development’s 561 affordable residences to come online. They’re set aside for those earning 40, 60, 120, and 165 percent of the area media income and range from $519/month studios to $3,424/month three-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

History, Lower East Side

The mysterious origins of the famous New York Egg Cream

By Rebecca Paul, Tue, January 31, 2017

egg cream

From Brooklyn Blackout Cake to Eggs Benedict, New York City is filled with gastronomic firsts. But while we have a clear origin for most of our foodie favorites, the New York Egg Cream is not one of them. This frothy sweet beverage is made from Fox’s U-Bet chocolate syrup, seltzer water, and a splash of milk, which makes its story even more confusing since the beloved drink contains neither eggs nor cream. There are a few theories currently in circulation about the name and origin of the Egg Cream, each varying in time and circumstance, but most confirming that the drink originated on the Lower East Side among Eastern European Jewish immigrants.

All the mysterious theories

Lower East Side, Nolita, Soho

DoBro (Downtown Brooklyn), MiMa (Midtown Manhattan), Hellsea (Hell’s Kitchen meets Chelsea), BoCoCa (Boerum Hill, Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens)–typically we blame brokers and real estate marketers for inventing outlandish neighborhood acronyms as a way to make their listings and developments seem unique and in uncharted territory. But this time, the writers over at Travel + Leisure have decided to try their hand at the name game, dubbing “NoLo” the next trendy ‘hood. “There’s no cooler neighborhood mashup,” they say, than “the parts of Soho where Nolita bumps against the Lower East Side.” Here you’ll find “a community of restaurants, shops, cafes and drinking spots that exude the city’s cutting edge style.”

Read more

Chinatown, condos, Construction Update, Lower East Side, New Developments

Despite the rapid influx of new development that’s popping up in the controversial Two Bridges area, the Chinatown-meets-Lower East Side neighborhood’s first project, One Manhattan Square, still reigns as the tallest. In fact, when it reaches its full 823-foot height, Extell’s 80-story condo at 252 South Street will have the highest rooftop between downtown and Midtown Manhattan. Now that sales have commencedCityRealty paid the construction site a visit, noticing that the double-slab tower is already more than 30 stories tall and has begun to receive its reflective glass skin.

More views ahead

Architecture, Hotels, Lower East Side, New Developments, Williamsburg

The 20-story, 300-room project at 185 Bowery was constructed in Poland and shipped to New York in 210 pieces. Owned by Dutch hotel developer/operator Citizen M with Brack Capital Real Estate, the high-rise hotel at 185 Bowery is more than half done, reports the Wall Street Journal. It will be the largest permanent modular hotel project ever in NYC. Modular construction is more common in Europe; the developer already has nine hotels up and running and 14 in the works. They’ve used the technique of stacking sealed, factory-made units containing finished hotel rooms on the majority of those projects.

Check out photos of the sealed hotel pods arriving

Architecture, Chinatown, Lower East Side, New Developments

259 Clinton Street, Perkins Eastman, Two Bridges, Starrett Group

The historically low-income, low-slung neighborhood of Two Bridges–the area along the East River, near the footings of the Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridges where the Lower East Side meets Chinatown–has become a high-rise hotbed over the past year. Despite the controversy that the four planned projects, all upwards of 700 feet, have caused, they’re moving along fairly swiftly, and The Lo-Down now has the big reveal for the final site–Starrett Group‘s 259 Clinton Street. Perkins Eastman Architects have designed the 724-foot, 62-story glass tower, which will have ground-floor retail and 732 apartments, 25 percent of which will be permanently affordable with a good chunk being set aside for low-income seniors.

More details and renderings ahead

Celebrities, Lower East Side, Recent Sales

Willem Dafoe unloads Lower East Side co-op for $860K

By Annie Doge, Mon, December 12, 2016

Though he’s usually cast as the villain, off screen, Willem Dafoe leads a much less destructive life, splitting his time between Rome, Los Angeles, and NYC with his Italian-born wife Giada Colagrande. While in the big apple, the actor resides in a West Village penthouse, but in 2005, he and his son Jack purchased a Lower East Side co-op for $606,000. It went on the market for $850,000 in May, and judging by the listing photos (a little bit artsy, a little bit messy), it was either the younger Dafoe (a public-policy researcher) or another renter who was living there. The Observer reports that it’s now sold above ask for $860,000.

See the place here

Chinatown, Lower East Side

L to R: One Manhattan Square, 247 Cherry Street, 260 South Street, and 271-283 South Street. The image above, created by CityRealty, depicts the possible massing of the new towers; No official design has been released

When L+M Partners and CIM Group announced plans last May for two 50-story towers at 260 South Street, their project joined a growing list of controversial towers sprouting up along the Two Bridges waterfront, including Extell’s 823-foot condo One Manhattan Square, JDS and SHoP Architects’ possible 1,000+ foot rental at 247 Cherry Street, and Starret Group’s shorter rental at 275 South Street. Now, in what’s becoming a trend for the Lower East Side-meets-Chinatown ‘hood, L+M and CIM have revealed plans for their project that actually show increased heights of 69 and 62 stories, or 798 and 728 feet. As first reported by The Lo-Down, the developers plan to include up to 1,350 apartments, 338 of which will be reserved as affordable, senior housing, ground-floor retail, landscaped outdoor spaces by Mathews Nielsen, and an upgraded flood-protection system.

Renderings and more details ahead

Featured Story

Features, Lower East Side, real estate trends

Images via Extell and Google Maps

The construction of Extell’s high-rise condo development at the foot of the Manhattan Bridge is now well underway. When complete, 250 South Street (formerly 227 Cherry Street) will rise more than 80 stories above the East River and be home to just under 800 units, but that’s not all. As the Extell building goes up, the surrounding area is also attracting growing attention from other developers. In July, JDS Development announced plans for a rental development just next door at 247 South Street. Given the scope of the Extell development and its neighboring rental development on South Street, thousands of new residents are expected to arrive in the Cherry Street neighborhood between now and 2020. Of course, there are many neighbors who arrived first.

READ MORE AT CITYREALTY…

Chinatown, condos, Cool Listings, Lower East Side, New Developments

Despite community opposition against the surge of new development in the Two Bridges neighborhood, things are moving full steam ahead in the Chinatown-meets-Lower East Side area. Curbed reports that the project that started it all, One Manhattan Square, has officially launched sales for the first batch of its 815 condos, and they range from a $1.18 million one-bedroom to a $4.4 million three-bedroom. It’s prices like these, as well as the 823-foot height, that have angered residents of the mostly low-rise and low-income neighborhood, but nevertheless, the huge luxury building at with an insane amenity package is well on its way to opening its doors.

Find out more this way

Architecture, Lower East Side, Major Developments, New Developments

Essex Crossing, Prusik Group, SHoP Architects, Essex street Market

The Essex Crossing megaproject is taking shape in the Lower East Side, most notably with the Market Line, the 150,000 square-foot retail area serving the project’s buildings. Within will be the new home for the neighborhood’s beloved 76-year-old Essex Street Market, upon which concept the modern retail destination was built. As 6sqft previously reported, the SHoP Architects-designed market will be among the largest in the nation. Principal Rohan Mehra of the project’s retail development firm Prusik Group told Curbed that he compares the new market to Seattle’s Pike Place Market or Barcelona’s La Boqueria, “hubs of activity” all. The Market Line will stretch over 700 feet across three buildings, incorporating the new city-operated Essex Street Market and several new spaces.

More renderings this way

Architecture, Lower East Side, New Developments

At the end of last year, preservationists called on the city to landmark the Lower East Side’s 1912 former bank building at the prominent corner of East Houston and Ludlow Streets. The request came after the owners revealed plans to construct a residential structure above the historic building. But despite much community opposition, they tapped Tribeca-based architects Rogers Partners to create a cantilevering, cube-like design (not unlike those we’ve seen of late from ODA) inspired by the work of artist Jasper Johns, who once lived and worked at the address. CityRealty now has new renderings of the 44,000-square-foot project at 225 East Houston Street, which will have 38 apartments and amenities including a roof deck, fitness center, residential lounge and terrace, bike storage, and laundry room.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Interiors, Lower East Side

237 Eldridge Street, Lower East Side co-op

Custom white lacquered cabinetry framed by dark mahogany trim, a sunny orange accent wall, and a sophisticated yet playful mix of patterns make this Lower East Side co-op cheery and cool. Located on a calm block of the otherwise bustling ‘hood–just a block from the 2nd Avenue F station and well within the mix of trendy and old-school businesses–the convertible two-bedroom is asking a very reasonable $575,000.

See it all ahead

Featured Story

Features, Lower East Side, photography, The urban lens

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, photographer Bob Estremera documents the historic buildings and businesses of the Lower East Side. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

When Bob lived briefly on the Lower East Side in 2011, he loved “walking its crumbling sidewalks and admiring it’s equally crumbling architecture.” But the neighborhood’s gentrification was already underway: “Tucked away among the little stores, restaurants, apartments and barber shops, upscale boutique restaurants were making themselves felt with prices and menus that could only be supported from clientele outside the neighborhood,” he describes. So he decided to return to the LES and capture what he feels is the area’s essence. In this resulting black-and-white series, he turns our attention to vestiges of the early days, “the decayed store fronts and once proud architecture and businesses that have vanished and others still clinging barely to life.”

Hear more from Bob and see all the photos

Architecture, Chinatown, Lower East Side, New Developments, Rentals

80 Rutgers Slip, 247 Cherry Street, JDS Development, SHoP Architects, Two Bridges

Last 6sqft checked on the rental building at 247 Cherry Street in the Two Bridges area of the Lower East Side, it was revealed that the tower would rise to 1,000 feet, not surprising considering it comes from the supertall power team of JDS Development and SHoP Architects. And now, after a Community Board 3 meeting earlier this week where JDS and SHoP addressed the controversial project, CityRealty.com brings a new set of renderings that show close-ups of the 77-story building’s green terra cotta facade and sky decks.

Check out all the new views

condos, Cool Listings, Lower East Side, New Developments

242 Broome Street, SHoP Architects, Essex Crossing

Only one of the 10 towers at Essex Crossing–the 1.65 million-square-foot, mixed-use, mega-development underway on the Lower East Side–will offer condos, and those looking to buy a residence there now have their chance. Curbed reports that sales have launched at 242 Broome Street, the SHoP-designed tower that will house 55 one- to three-bedroom condos, 11 of which will be affordable. As 6sqft previously shared, market-rate units will range from $1,275,000 to $7,000,000. Along with this news comes the first set of interior renderings from DXA Studio, whose designs “balance serenity with modernism.”

More details and renderings ahead

condos, gentrification, Lower East Side, New Developments

196 Orchard, Ben Shaoul, LES, Lower East Side, Katz's, new developments, condominiums

Developer Ben Shaoul’s new Lower East Side condos adjacent to Katz’s famous deli at 196 Orchard Street have just hit the market. Definitely in line with the 21st century version of the storied neighborhood, the 96 newly-minted apartments have luxurious finishes, expansive views and enviable amenities, with units starting at $1.075 million for a studio.

This way for more details and lots of interior renderings

Green Design, Landscape Architecture, Lower East Side, Urban Design

lowline, James Ramsey, Dan Barasch, underground park, Entrance to the Lowline, lowline renderings, raad architecture

Lowline Lab via 6sqft

Just a couple months ago, the NYC Economic Development Corporation granted preliminary approvals to the Lowline, the world’s first underground park. This came after the city put out a Request for Expressions of Interest (RFEI) late last year for the 60,000-square-foot abandoned trolley terminal below Delancey Street. The Lowline proposal was the only one received, and initially the 154-page document was only to be publicly available through a Freedom of Information Law request, but the group worked with the EDC to release it to the community. The Lo-Down got a look at the document, which reveals everything from the projected cost of the project ($83 million) and operating hours (6am to 9pm, five days a week) to specific design elements like a “ramble” and 1,600-square-foot cafe/bar.

Lots more details this way

Lower East Side, Transportation

NYC bike architecture

The city’s newly released, five-year transportation plan is all about the bikes. As part of his larger Vision Zero initiative, the Mayor announced yesterday that he’ll roll out 75 miles of new bike lanes by the end of this year, which includes 18 miles of protected lanes, reports Gothamist. They’ll be dispersed throughout the five boroughs, but centered in areas where the highest number of cyclist and pedestrian fatalities occur.

Find out more

Featured Story

CityRealty, Features, Interviews, Lower East Side, New Developments

The closing of Streit’s Matzo Factory last year was difficult for many long-time Lower East Siders to stomach. The factory was a near century-old institution that represented a bygone era untouched by gentrification. Unsurprisingly as a result, the condos designed to rise on the storied site have come under the scrutiny since their debut. But those grievances reveal just one side of the story.

In two fascinating interviews ahead, Cogswell Realty developer Arthur Stern and Gluck+ architect Charlie Kaplan share with us how they approached the redevelopment of the historic building located at 150 Rivington, as well as their inspiration for the glassy new structure that will replace it. The pair also speak about their relationship with Streit family throughout the process, and why the Streit’s departure ultimately had little to do with cost or gentrification.

READ THE INTERVIEW WITH THE DEVELOPER HERE… 

READ THE INTERVIEW WITH THE ARCHITECT HERE…

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