real estate trends

Midtown West, real estate trends

Apple may be a new tenant at 11 Penn Plaza

By Michelle Cohen, Wed, January 22, 2020

11 Penn Plaza, apple, vornado

Streetview of 11 Penn Plaza, Map data © 2020 Google

Apple is in negotiations to lease 200,000 square feet of space at 11 Penn Plaza, The New York Post reports. Sources told the Post that the tech giant is interested in the 1.15-million-square-foot building that stretches along Seventh Avenue between West 31st and 32nd streets across from Madison Square Garden after losing out to Facebook on a spot in the Farley Building. The building is owned by Vornado, who is looking for tenants to lease the fourth through 14th floors as a sublease from Macy’s.

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Coney Island, real estate trends

Photo by Shinya Suzuki on Flickr

Owners of six small businesses in Coney Island, Lola Star Boutique, Nathan’s Famous, Ruby’s Bar & Grill, Paul’s Daughter, Tom’s Restaurant, and the Coney Island Beach Shop, are currently negotiating new 10-year lease agreements with amusement park operator Zamperla. The New York Times reported on Wednesday that the boardwalk businesses are facing rent increases of between 50 and 400 percent each. “We care about Coney Island and its future, and we are dedicated to making it as strong a community as possible,” Alessandro Zamperla, the president of the company, told the Times. “This is why we’ve been working with our tenants to ensure their success and preserve the character of Coney Island.” Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration has not come forward with a plan to mediate; according to the newspaper, the rent increases do not violate the agreement between Zamperla and the city.

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CityRealty, real estate trends

trump tower, real estate values

Photo by Krystal T via Flickr cc

In November, 6sqft shared data that showed sales at Trump Tower were still in a post-2016 slump, but year-end figures show that the decline is a larger trend across Trump-branded buildings in NYC. According to CityRealty’s annual Manhattan Year-End Report, “In the third full year of Donald Trump’s presidency, the average sales price for the 11 Trump-branded condos in Manhattan once again fell below the Manhattan condo average.”

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Chelsea, real estate trends

Famed flea market in Chelsea has closed

By Devin Gannon, Mon, December 30, 2019

The Hell’s Kitchen Antiques Fair & Flea Market closed in 2018; Photo by S.J.I on Flickr

After nearly five decades in operation, a famed flea market in Chelsea officially closed on Sunday, the New York Times reported. Alan Boss, the owner of the Annex Antiques Fair and Flea Market, which first opened in 1976 on a corner lot on West 25th Street, said the landlords did not renew the market’s lease. While Boss said he hoped to find a new location, there isn’t much remaining in the expanding neighborhood. “The current location was the last available lot of any size,” Boss told the Times.

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CityRealty, real estate trends

Ultra-high-end sales defined the 2019 real estate market

By Dana Schulz, Fri, December 27, 2019

Looking north towards Billionaires’ Row in early October © 6sqft

Throughout the year, there was much speculation that the real estate market was on a decline, but according to CityRealty’s annual Manhattan Year-End Report, ultra-high-end sales continue to keep the market strong. On par with 2018’s 228 sales, this year saw 221 sales at $10 million or more, totaling $4.6 billion, up from last year’s $4.2 billion. As CityRealty tells us, this is “largely due to big-ticket purchases near the southern end of Central Park, most notably at 220 Central Park South,” which accounts for one-third of that total, as well as a glut of new development condos coming online.

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Policy, real estate trends

Photo via Creative Commons

New homebuyers in New York City could be charged property tax based on actual market prices, the New York Post reported on Wednesday. A group of city lawmakers is pressing Albany to change state laws to close a loophole that offers tax breaks to homebuyers in gentrifying neighborhoods. The “gentrification tax,” as the Post called it, would have homebuyers pay market rate taxes, rather than the assessed value, as a way to make the system fairer.

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real estate trends

Photo by Photo by Susan Sermoneta on Flickr

The number of chain stores in New York City dropped for the second consecutive year, down 3.7 percent in 2019, according to a new report. Despite this decline in retailers, two stores continue to grow across the five boroughs: Dunkin’ and Metro by T-Mobile. The Center for an Urban Future’s annual “State of the Chains” report found that the coffee chain is the city’s largest national retailer with 636 total stores, adding 12 locations since 2018, followed by the cell phone store, formerly called MetroPCS, which operates 468 stores citywide.

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Central Park South, real estate trends, Recent Sales

220 Central Park SOuth, Vornado, Robert A.M., Stern

Via Vornado Realty Trust and Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Despite some trepidation about the luxury sales market, the year is finishing strong, at least near Billionaires’ Row, which was just named the most expensive street in the entire world. As the NY Post first reported, property records filed today show a $92.7 million penthouse sale at 220 Central Park South, making it the third-most-expensive NYC sale ever, behind billionaire Ken Griffith’s $238 million purchase also at 220 CPS in early 2019 and Michael Dell’s $100 million buy at One57 in 2015. Though it was purchased by an anonymous LLC, the Wall Street Journal uncovered that billionaire hedge-funder Daniel Och is the buyer.

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Central Park South, Manhattan, Midtown, real estate trends

Looking north towards Billionaires’ Row in early October © 6sqft 

A new study of the top “ultra-prime” locations in the world dispels any doubt that Billionaire’s Row is living up to its name. London-based property consultancy Knight Frank, along with Douglas Elliman, looked at the number of homes sold for over $25 million since 2015 and found the greatest concentration along Midtown’s 57th Street, where 41 transactions have been closed in the last five years at an average price of $38.5 million. Manhattan cracked the top ten three more times, with Central Park South coming in third, followed by Park Avenue and Fifth Avenue in fourth and seventh place.

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Featured Story

Features, real estate trends

NYC real estate experts offer their 2020 predictions

By Emily Nonko, Mon, December 16, 2019

NYC skyline, Central Park skyline, Billionaires' Row

Photo by Leonhard Niederwimmer via Pixabay

In some ways, 2019 was a continuation of the past few years: political and global uncertainty loomed over the New York real estate market, development continued at a steady pace, and prices were as high as ever. (Oh wait — they were actually higher.) But the year also brought notable changes, from a total overhaul of rent and tenant protections, increased urgency in regards to climate change, an increasingly buyer’s market, and dry-up of the once pervasive rental concessions.

So what’s in store for the year ahead? Real estate experts believe sustained political uncertainty — particularly around an election year — could mean buyers proceed cautiously. The new rent laws will undoubtedly shape New York, as both the rental and condo markets tighten. Pre-war design will make a comeback in defiance of glassy modern architecture, while the focus on sustainability will increase and amenities will become more flexible.

Keep reading for the 6sqft’s full roundup of 2020 predictions.

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