MORE TOP STORIES

Getting Away, Places to Stay, Upstate

Stay in an Adirondack tree house retreat this summer

By Emily Nonko, Today, May 24, 2017

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , May 24, 2017

If you’re looking for a unique summer retreat not far from NYC, here’s your answer. This cozy treehouse is nestled in the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains, nine miles from the upstate town of Saratoga Springs. In this quiet, remote locale, a winding staircase takes you from a patio up the tree and into a wood cabin. It’s outfitted with everything you’d need, including a bathroom, lofted bed, and built-in storage. And right outside the sleeping quarters is a covered porch perfect for reading or writing. For such a quiet, private retreat, it’ll cost $179 a night.

See inside the tree house

Architecture, hudson yards, New Developments

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , May 24, 2017

Back in September, the developer Joseph Chetrit filed plans to build a 48-floor mixed-use tower with 421 hotel rooms and 135 residential units in the Hudson Yards neighborhood. Now, the wait is over as renderings of Chetrit Group’s proposed tower at 541-545 West 37th Street have officially been revealed. As CityRealty learned, CetraRuddy Architecture is designing the high-tech skyscraper, which is expected to rise 622 feet and overlook the future Hudson Boulevard Park. The building will span 621,000 square feet and include exhibition, retail, hotel and residential spaces.

More details and renderings

Art, hudson yards, Major Developments, Midtown West

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , May 24, 2017

Michael R. Bloomberg has added a $75 million contribution to what the New York Times calls “New York’s first new cultural institution in recent memory,” the arts center known as The Shed, part of the new Hudson Yards development on Manhattan’s far west side. The former mayor’s gift brings the total raised for the project to $421 million of its $500 million capital campaign. The new arts center has gotten much of its funding from a small group of billionaires that includes Related Companies’ Stephen M. Ross and media mogul Barry Diller. Set for completion in 2019, the eight-level structure, designed by Diller Scofidio & Renfro in partnership with the Rockwell Group, will host performances, concerts, visual art, music and other events.

A ‘tool kit for artists’

Midtown West, Policy, Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , May 24, 2017

Seeking innovative solutions to fix the mess that is the New York City transit system, Governor Cuomo on Tuesday launched a competition called the “MTA Genius Transit Challenge.” Just one of the governor’s recently proposed ideas to fix the subway, the international competition challenges participants to develop ideas for better signaling, new car designs, and WiFi throughout the system, including in tunnels. The winner of each category will receive $1 million and a possible contract deal with the state. In addition to the challenge, Cuomo announced he has created a Penn Station Task Force to devise alternative transportation solutions during Amtrak’s track work at the station this summer.
Find out more

Featured Story

Architecture, Brooklyn, Features, History, Top Stories

Top 10 secrets of the Brooklyn Bridge

By Emily Nonko, Today, May 24, 2017

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , May 24, 2017

134 years ago today, throngs of New Yorkers came to the Manhattan and Brooklyn waterfronts to celebrate the opening of what was then known as the New York and Brooklyn Bridge. 1,800 vehicles and 150,300 people total crossed what was then the only land passage between Brooklyn and Manhattan. The bridge–later dubbed the Brooklyn Bridge, a name that stuck–went on to become one of the most iconic landmarks in New York. But there’s been plenty of history, and secrets, along the way. Lesser known facts about the bridge include everything from hidden wine cellars to a parade of 21 elephants crossing in 1884. So for the Brooklyn Bridge’s 134th anniversary, 6sqft rounded up its top 10 most intriguing secrets.

All the secrets right this way

Cool Listings, East Village

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , May 24, 2017

This unusual East Village one-bedroom duplex condo in the Village Mews at 407 East 12th Street checks all the boxes without shouting–that is, it lets a rare and fabulous garden paradise do the talking, which in this case means asking for $1.695 million. The 750-square-foot home was recently renovated from tip to toe, and the design is tasteful without being generically “luxe.” And while this not-huge condo wouldn’t work for a growing family or a communal crew, it looks heavenly for anyone seeking, an “oasis away from city living” while situated on a lovely street in the heart of what could be called an oasis of city living, with its 24-hour energy and unending list of destinations of every kind.

Here comes the sun

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Williamsburg

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , May 24, 2017

Three units in East Williamsburg reserved for those earning 60 percent of the area median income have come online through the city’s affordable housing lottery. Two $958/month studios and one $1,096/month one-bedroom are available at 387 Manhattan Avenue, a new six-story mixed-use development half a block east of the BQE, three blocks from McCarren Park, and right near all the local hot spots like the Llama Inn, Museum of Food and Drink, Pete’s Candy Store, and Union Pool.

Find out if you qualify

Cool Listings, Downtown Brooklyn, Interiors

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , May 23, 2017

With two exposures, 11-foot ceilings and walls of windows, this 1,100-square-foot two-bedroom loft condo in the Toy Factory Lofts at 176 Johnson Street has its heart in the right place–even if its bathroom isn’t. The historic 1926 building–once the home of Tudor Metal Products and birthplace of many mid-20th-century toys–lends itself to authentic loft living in ever-changing Downtown Brooklyn. A modern renovation makes loft living easy–with a possible exception or two–and the $1.25 million ask comes with low carrying costs.

About that bathroom

condos, Financial District, New Developments, Starchitecture, Top Stories

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , May 23, 2017

Three years after completing his first New York City building, an affordable housing complex in Harlem called the Sugar Hill Development, starchitect David Adjaye is back. This time, he’ll be working with David Lichtenstein’s Lightstone Group to design a 61-story, 750-foot-tall condominium in the Financial District at 130 William Street known as the Wall Street Tower. Renderings uncovered by CityRealty show a gold-trimmed prism set against rigid rows of arched windows, as well as a glimpse at what the 244 apartments and amenity spaces will look like.

See the impressive renderings

maps, More Top Stories, Transportation

  • By Diane Pham
  • , May 23, 2017

The NYC subway map tidily lays out over 665 miles of track and 472 stations into a simple, easy-to-read design. While the map gives the impression that our fair city’s transit system is orderly and evenly spaced, as any true straphanger will tell you, that’s not the reality. Indeed, those colorful lines and nodes have been placed for maximum legibility, simply showing geographical approximations that often don’t even kind of match up with real life (as this man will tell you). Now, one redditor brings us an entrancing new animation that removes the MTA’s distortion, giving us a look at the real distance that exists between stations and lines.

mor here

Midtown East, Policy

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , May 23, 2017

Image of Greenacre Park courtesy of Sasaki

As a small oasis in the center of Manhattan, Greenacre Park is home to honey locust trees, azaleas, pansies and a 25-foot-high waterfall, all taking up just 6,360 square feet of space. However, the city’s plan to rezone Midtown East to allow for more commercial buildings worries some advocates who say it may deplete Greenacre Park from any sunlight, as the Times reported. But the Municipal Art Society, New Yorkers for Parks, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer and Councilmember Daniel Garodnick, are backing a campaign called “Fight For Light” to protect the park’s right to sunlight.

Get the full scoop

Featured Story

Events, Features, Green Design, More Top Stories

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , May 23, 2017

With spring in NYC ushering in blooming trees, flowering plants, and blossoming gardens, many New Yorkers wish they had better access to these natural beauties. But even if you’re not fortunate enough to have a backyard, garden, or terrace (or fire escape for that matter), there are loads of ways to get your green thumb on in the city. From flower arranging in a cute Williamsburg shop to landscape design at the New York Botanical Garden to a houseplant 101 class in Chelsea, 6sqft has rounded up a dozen of the best places for gardening, plant, and flower classes in the city.

Parouse the full list

condos, Green Design, Landscape Architecture, Lower East Side, New Developments, Video

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , May 23, 2017

Adding to its unique character, Extell’s One Manhattan Square will soon be home to NYC’s largest outdoor private garden, detailed in a new video released today by the developer. The proposal, designed by urban planning and landscape architecture firm West 8, includes more than an acre of garden space for residents to both work and socialize, boasting indoor and outdoor grilling spaces, ping-pong tables, a putting green, children’s playground, adult tree house, tea pavilion, and an observatory made for stargazing.

Watch the video here

Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Policy, Urban Design

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , May 23, 2017

6sqft reported in March on the latest developments in the on-again-off-again status of the $200 million Barry Diller-funded offshore park/performing arts center proposed for Pier 55 on the Hudson River; though construction began last November, opponents of the project, led by the City Club of New York, gained a victory in the form of a ruling by Judge Lorna G. Schofield that agreed with group’s claim that the Army Corps of Engineers had not conducted a sufficient environmental review on how the 2.4-acre park would affect fish and wildlife. The judge ordered that work stop at the site and called for a review of alternatives for building along Hudson River Park, a maritime sanctuary. Now, the New York Times reports that the Corps of Engineers, with the project’s sponsor, the Hudson River Park Trust, has filed an appeal of the decision.

And what about that Diller-Durst feud

Transportation, Upper East Side

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , May 23, 2017

Just a month after opening on the first of the year, the Second Avenue Subway had eased congestion on the Lexington line by 11 percent. Now, nearly five months in, that figure has more than doubled, with ridership on the 4/5/6 decreased by 26 percent and a whopping 40 percent during peak morning hours. Moreover, Second Avenue’s average weekday ridership is up from 140,000 to 176,000 passengers, an increase which has prompted the MTA to add two additional train trips during rush hour come this November.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Interiors, Williamsburg

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , May 23, 2017

This expansive Williamsburg triplex was once a part of the flagship retail space for a children’s clothing manufacturer–when the cast iron building was constructed in the 1880s, the first floor held retail while the sewing machines, shears and bosses occupied the upper floors. Now the building, located at 138 Broadway, is known as the Smith Gray condominium, and this apartment is asking $2.3 million. Over 2,300 square feet, you’ll spot tin ceilings, Corinthian columns and exposed structural brick. While those are pretty typical loft details, this apartment boasts one of the more unique lofts in Brooklyn. It’s clad with reclaimed cedar from New York’s iconic wooden water towers, which results in a cozy loft enclosure that can be opened via specially-designed casement windows.

See more of the apartment

Celebrities, Hamptons, Historic Homes, More Top Stories, Recent Sales

  • By Annie Doge
  • , May 22, 2017

Sources tell Behind the Hedges that “Iron Man” actor Robert Downey Jr. bought the historic Edward DeRose Windmill Cottage on East Hampton. Built circa 1885 to resemble a local windmill (it was never functional), the home sits on four acres and boasts a seven-bedroom main house, two-bedroom guesthouse, three-car garage with a potting shed, 50-foot pool, tennis court, and gorgeous landscaped gardens. It’s been on and off the market since 2014 when it listed for $13.5 million. The following year, the price dropped to $11.5 million, but property records show a sale last summer for $10.5 million disguised under an LLC.

Take a look around

Brooklyn, CityRealty, Manhattan, New Jersey, Rentals

  • By Ondel Hylton
  • , May 22, 2017

Images (L to R): Journal Squared, 507 West Chelsea, 525 West 52nd Street and Yorkshire Towers

  • Two-Tower Hell’s Kitchen Rental Debuts with Impressive Leasing Special [link]
  • More Than Views – A Closer Look at Jersey City’s 53-Story Rental, Journal Squared [link]
  • No-Fee Apartments with 2 Months Free at 507 West Chelsea, Luxe Living on the High Line [link]
  • New Harlem Rentals Debut on 125th Street; Apartments from $1,994/Month [link]
  • $1,000 Deposits at Murray Hill High-Rise 300 East 39th Street [link]
  • New Bushwick Rental Launches with Leasing Special; 1-Bedrooms from $2,400/Month [link]
  • A Look at The Brooklyn Zinc, New Prospect Heights Rental Ready for Launch [link]
  • Factory Converted Apartments at DUMBO’s 30 Washington Street Listed with 1 Month of Free Rent [link]
  • Skyscraping Apartments at EOS in the Heart of Manhattan Offer 1 Month Free [link]
  • Loft Living at DUMBO’s 99 Gold; Apartments Available with 1 Month of Free Rent [link]
  • Upper East Side Post-War Tower Offers 1 Month Free on Renovated Apartments [link]
  • The Giovanni in Downtown Brooklyn Offering New Leases with 1 Month of Free Rent [link]
  • Financial District High Rise ‘The Lara’ Offers 1 Month Free on Select Units [link]
  • One Month Free on Select Units at Harlem’s Eco-Friendly Rental, Tapestry [link]

SEE MORE RENTAL NEWS AND OFFERS HERE >>

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , May 22, 2017

View of the development’s block

Praxis Housing Initiatives “is NYC’s largest provider of transitional housing to homeless people with HIV/AIDS and is one of city’s lowest cost/highest service housing providers.” As part of its 2012 strategic plan, the organization began a permanent supportive housing program, and in just two years time they opened their first development in the Bronx. In 2015, they closed on the second at 2264 Loring Place North in Kings Bridge Heights and built an eight-story, 66-unit building. Of these apartments, 14 are reserved for community-based affordable housing for those earning 60 percent of the area median income. They include $931/month one-bedrooms and $1,123/month two-bedrooms and have just come online through the city’s affordable housing lottery.

All the logistics ahead

Art, Celebrities

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , May 22, 2017

Jason deCaires Taylor’s “Silent Evolution” wave via Roosevelt Island Operating Corporation

Ocean conservation nonprofit Project 0 has partnered with luxury skin care brand La Mer, to bring 52 wave-shaped sculptures designed by artists and entertainers like Keith Richards, Slash, Sienna Miller, Rita Ora, Cara Delevigne to NYC. Between May 20 and June 21, the La Mer Wave Walk will feature public art pieces throughout the five boroughs to raise awareness about ocean conservancy, as DNA Info learned. The installations will be up for auction on June 21, with all proceeds going to the charity La Mer Blue Heart Oceans Fund for Project 0.

Find out more

Getting Away, Places to Stay

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , May 22, 2017

If smelly subway platforms and sweaty tourist hordes start to loom large this summer, there might be cabin for two on the shores of New York Harbor with your name on it. Gateway National Recreation Area–which includes Fort Tilden, Jacob Riis Park, Floyd Bennett Field, Great Kills Park, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, and Canarsie Pier–and Getaway, a company that provides pop-up camping houses, are placing three tiny cabins along NYC’s harbor shore to provide a place to spend a quiet summer night in a national park, reports Gothamist.

Check it out

Featured Story

Brooklyn Heights, DUMBO, Features, Interviews, Top Stories

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , May 22, 2017

134 years ago, the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge transformed the Brooklyn waterfront, not to mention the entire borough, by providing direct access into Kings County from Lower Manhattan. The opening only boosted Brooklyn’s burgeoning waterfront, which became a bustling shipping hub for the New York Dock Company by the early 1900s. Business boomed for several decades until changes in the industry pushed the shipping industry from Brooklyn to New Jersey. And after the late 1950s, when many of the warehouses were demolished to make way for construction of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway, the waterfront fell into severe decline.

New Yorkers today are living through a new kind of Brooklyn waterfront boom, heralded by the Brooklyn Bridge Park. Ideas to transform the abandoned, run-down waterfront into a park seemed like a pipe dream when the idea was floated in the 1980s, but years of dedication by the local community and politicians turned the vision into reality. Today, the park is considered one of the best in the city.

continue reading here

History, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Midtown

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , May 22, 2017

State Senators Brad Hoylman and Liz Krueger have asked the Landmarks Preservation Commission to designate the Rose Main Reading Room at the New York Public Library’s main branch and the Bill Blass Public Catalog Room at the 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue branch as interior landmarks, according to DNAInfo. The library’s main branch, the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, was given landmark designation in 1967 and Astor Hall and the grand staircases within the building were designated as interior landmarks in 1974. Interior landmark designation would give the two reading rooms–favorites of literary greats including Norman Mailer, E.L. Doctorow and Elizabeth Bishop–the same protection moving forward.

Find out more

Policy, Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , May 22, 2017

As his administration finalizes its budget plan, Governor Cuomo wrote a letter Sunday to President Trump asking for emergency federal funds to lessen what he called Penn Station’s “summer of agony,” reports the Daily News. With six weeks of infrastructure repairs coming to the transit hub this July and August, the governor said the station’s daily flow of 600,000 passengers will face a 20 percent reduction in service during peak hours while Amtrak shuts down some of its tracks, which will then have a ripple effect on the subway system and regional transit.

More details ahead

Cool Listings, Interiors, Upper East Side

  • By Annie Doge
  • , May 22, 2017

The 7,067 square-foot penthouse at 995 Fifth Avenue owned by Claude Wasserstein, ex wife of the late Bruce Wasserstein, former chair of investment firm Lazard, was just listed for the first time since a brief stint on the market in 2010. Wasserstein, who died in 2009, was the brother of the late playwright Wendy Wasserstein. The 11-room, five-bedroom duplex atop the Rosario Candela-designed former Stanhope hotel was purchased by Ms. Wasserstein for $34.8 million in 2008, The Real Deal reports. In addition to five garden-like wraparound terraces crafted by landscape designer Madison Cox, “epic NYC views” and 72 linear feet of Central Park frontage, the full-service building offers top-drawer amenities like a gym and a spa. But does all of that add up to $65 million–$9,285 per square foot?

Get lost in the terraces and gardens overlooking Central Park

Architecture, Design, Upstate

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , May 21, 2017

Steven Harris Architects designed this modern upstate retreat for Steven Harris himself and his partner Lucien Rees Roberts, a British interior designer, who together own the 50-acre private estate. The land, known as Kinderhook Retreat, is located atop a hill between the Catskills and the Berkshires. Not to overwhelm the pastoral landscape design, the minimalist buildings were outfitted with a modernist white-shingled design. The design has evolved since the construction of the first building, in 1992, and even includes a croquet stadium and two-acre man-made lake.

Take the tour

Cool Listings, Interiors, Prospect Heights

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , May 20, 2017

This charming pad comes from the top floor of 786 Washington Avenue, a 16-unit prewar co-op in Prospect Heights. Interior details include 11-foot ceilings, exposed brick, and hardwood flooring throughout. But the real perk is exclusive rights to the portion of the roof directly above the apartment, which is currently outfitted with a deck and custom bench seating. This appealing combo of indoor and outdoor space, plus the nice Brooklyn location, is on the market for $625,000.

This way for a tour

affordable housing, Architecture, Design, Technology

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , May 19, 2017

The growing need to build affordable housing in big, dense cities while keeping expenses to a minimum led to Malaysian designer Haseef Rafiei’s idea for a futuristic “skyscraper” housing pod vending machine. A Dezeen video shows how the designer–he won an honorable mention in this year’s eVolo Skyscraper Competition–inspired by the fascination with vending machines and robotics in Japan, sketched up the skyscraper idea for offering prospective homeowners a way to customize–and then create–a modular home. The home would then be slotted into place within a high-rise framework. According to the designer, the Pod Vending Machine is based on a “3D-printed building that grows in parallel with the city’s housing demand.”

Check out this ‘affordable mass produced home dispenser’

affordable housing, New Developments, Policy, Upper East Side

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , May 19, 2017

After over a year-long debate, the city has finally unveiled renderings of a mixed-income tower set to rise on an existing playground at the Holmes Towers public housing complex in Yorkville. The New York City Housing Authority’s plan, which falls under the city’s NextGen program, will construct a 47-story building among the complex on East 93rd Street, as well as a new 18,000-square-foot recreation and community center run by Asphalt Green (h/t DNA Info). The new building will feature 300 total units, with half of them at market-rate prices and half of them affordable. However, an alleged plan to separate the floors by income level, as well as the fact that high-end housing is coming to a low-income site where the community wasn’t consulted, has sparked a good deal of controversy.

Get the whole story

Featured Story

Features, History, More Top Stories, photography, The urban lens

The Urban Lens: A tourist’s take on NYC in 1979

By Dana Schulz, Fri, May 19, 2017

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , May 19, 2017

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, we share a set of vintage photos documenting NYC in 1979. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

In the spring of 1979, a 20-something Australian tourist came to NYC and was immediately struck by its fast pace and no-nonsense attitude (“there seemed to be an unwritten rule not to make eye contact or speak to strangers,” he told Gothamist), as well as how much in disrepair parts of the city were, especially Harlem. He documented his experience through a series of color slides, which were recently rediscovered and present a unique view of how exciting, frightening, and mysterious New York was to an outsider at this time.

See all the historic photos

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