MORE TOP STORIES

Daily Link Fix

Via Pexels (L) ; Flower District via Flickr/cc (R)

  • The city will preserve 669 Section 8 apartments for 40 years. They’re located in “high-cost neighborhoods”–Williamsburg, Harlem, the East Village–“where the majority of similar buildings have converted to market-rate.” [NYC HPD]
  • Twenty percent of dwelling units currently under construction in New York City are in a hotel. [TRD]
  • Once a $120 million engine, NYC’s Flower District is being killed off by competition, construction and ICE. [Bloomberg]
  • The Museum of Ice Cream, the Museum of Pizza, the Color Factory–how do the city’s new influx of pop-up museums find real estate? [Commercial Observer]
  • Essex Crossing’s Target is now open! [The Lo-Down]
  • And so is the new Four Seasons restaurant after a two-year hiatus and a $30 million buildout. [Gothamist]

affordable housing, Bed Stuy, housing lotteries

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 16, 2018

A six-story building in Bed-Stuy launched a lottery this week for 35 affordable apartments. Developed in collaboration between Comunilife and NYC Health + Hospitals, the Woodhull Residence at 179 Throop Avenue contains 89 studio apartments, designed as supportive and affordable housing. The apartments up for grabs through the lottery are set aside for individual New Yorkers earning 50 and 60 percent of the area median income, or between $27,463 and $43,860 annually, and include $746/month and $903/month studios.

Find out if you qualify

New Jersey, Policy

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , August 16, 2018

Image courtesy of Shinya Suzuki via Flickr.

Five million people a year visit New Jersey’s 1,212 acre Liberty State Park on the west shore of New York Harbor for views of Lady Liberty and the the New York City skyline and a visit to its historic rail terminal. But even as the public land is enjoyed by the public for which it is set aside, private interests see the taxpayer-owned waterfront parkland as a jackpot waiting to happen in the form of luxury resort concepts like a golf course and, the most recent pitch, a Formula One racetrack with a 100,000-seat grandstand and fields for international cricket matches, Bloomberg reports. Though they would be on mostly private land, the developer wants 20 acres of the park in order to offer rich revelers its breathtaking views in return for cleaning up 200 contaminated, fenced-off park acres.

Find out more

Lower East Side, Museums

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 16, 2018

Image via Tenement Museum

The Tenement Museum will open a new kiosk at the Market Line inside the Essex Crossing development on the Lower East Side, developer Delancy Street Associates announced on Thursday. The kiosk will feature a screen with tour times and other information about the museum. When it opens later this year, the Market Line will run three city blocks and include 100 locally-sourced food, art, fashion and music vendors. The market, projected to be the largest of its kind in New York City, sits inside Essex Crossing, a 1.9-million-square foot mixed-use development.

Get the details

Featured Story

Features, GVSHP, History, Hudson Square, More Top Stories

From George Washington to Hudson Square: The history of the Charlton-King-VanDam neighborhood

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, August 16, 2018

  • By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation
  • , August 16, 2018

Google Street View of Federal-style rowhouses on VanDam Street

It’s an often-overlooked enclave with the largest concentration of Federal and Greek Revival style houses in New York City. Its origins can be traced back to historical figures as esteemed as George Washington, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jacob Astor, but it’s just as deeply connected to Italian immigrants and radical 20th-century innovators. The most dyed-in-the-wool New Yorker will have trouble telling you if it’s in Greenwich Village, SoHo, or Hudson Square.

The tiny Charlton-King-VanDam neighborhood is, as its name would imply, located along charming Charlton, King, and VanDam Streets between Sixth Avenue and Varick Streets, with a little arm extending up the southernmost block of MacDougal Street just below Houston Street. It was only the fourth designated historic district in New York City when it was landmarked on August 16th, 1966, and for good reason.

Find out the full history

Architecture, Bushwick, Design

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 16, 2018

A new rental development designed by ODA Architecture has been dubbed by its developers as a building “made for Bushwick.” And once you tour the sprawling, two-block site, that bold declaration makes more sense. Located on part of the former site of Brooklyn’s Rheingold Brewery at 54 Noll Street (with its still-under-construction sister site at 123 Melrose Street), the Denizen Bushwick features a fragmented facade with rust-colored, deeply-recessed windows. But what stands out the most at the building, in addition to its bisecting green promenade and interconnected courtyards, remain the corridors of large-scale art that stand seven stories tall.

Take the tour

Events

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , August 16, 2018

Image courtesy of Cooper Hewitt

Smithsonian Magazine Museum Day–formerly Museum Day Live–is happening this year on September 22; it’s a chance to get free admission to museums across the country, including many great NYC options. Tickets became available on August 15 on the Smithsonian site, where you can download two free tickets to museums, galleries and cultural institutions like the Cooper Hewitt design museum, the Museum of Arts and Design, the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum and many, many more.

Choose from over 1,300 museums

Bronx, Cool Listings

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , August 16, 2018

With a beautifully-designed, renovated boho-chic interiors and a stone exterior that seems to grow right from the verdant landscape, this “European country” Tudor-style house at 2741 Edgehill Avenue in the northwest Bronx neighborhood of Spuyten Duyvil looks pretty good at $1.6 million even without three patios and parking for five cars. It’s also minutes from Metro North and not far from the 1 subway line.

Take the tour

Policy

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 15, 2018

Image of Rikers Island via Wikimedia

Four new borough-based jails have been proposed for New York City as part of a plan to close Rikers Island, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Wednesday. The proposed facilities, which include building sites in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens, will contain about 1,500 beds each and offer on-site support services. The new jails would include space for educational programming, recreation, therapeutic services and staff parking. There will also be community facilities and street-level retail space, providing amenities to the surrounding neighborhood.

Find out more

City Living, History

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , August 15, 2018

“Public squares, parks, and places in the City of New York.” Via NYPL Digital Collections.

Built to emulate Great Britain’s enviable squares, which were actually square, Manhattan’s public squares were created in the celebrated New York City tradition of being whatever they pleased–and definitely not square. According to the New York Daily News, Manhattan doesn’t have any actual squares at all: Lisa Keller, executive editor of the Encyclopedia of New York City, said “Americans just call it a square if it’s bigger than a breadbox.” But those 40 squares from Madison to Foley, Herald and Greeley have been vital in defining the city’s public spaces; they were its first parks, and a predecessor to the granddaddy of all squares, Central Park.

Squares that shaped the city

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