MORE TOP STORIES

Brooklyn, Design, Interiors

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , September 21, 2017

This Brooklyn abode feels more like a compound than traditional townhouse, with a redesign that blurred the lines between inside and out, and added three pavilions to the backyard. Two pavilions extend from the rear of the townhouse, while the third was envisioned as a mini writers retreat. (We’ve swooned over this backyard pavilion before.) Inside the main house, the completely paired down, modern interiors were finished with light wood, gray tile and high ceilings.

Head inside

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, History, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Union Square

From Willem de Kooning’s loft to the threat of the wrecking ball: The history of 827-831 Broadway

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, September 21, 2017

  • By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation
  • , September 21, 2017

827-831 Broadway today via Wiki Commons (L); Willem de Kooning in his Fourth Avenue studio, April 1946. Harry Bowden, photographer. Harry Bowden papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.Via The Willem de Kooning Foundation. (R)

Underneath the lyrical and much-admired sherbet-colored facades of the twin lofts at 827-831 Broadway lies a New York tale like no other. Incorporating snuff, sewing machines, and cigar store Indians; Abstract Expressionists; and the “antique dealer to the stars,” it also involves real estate and big money, and the very real threat of the wrecking ball. Ahead, explore the one-of-a-kind past of these buildings, which most notably served as the home to world-famous artist Willem de Kooning, and learn about the fight to preserve them not only for their architectural merit but unique cultural history.

Get the entire history

Featured Story

Events, Features, holidays, NYC Guides

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , September 21, 2017

As the weather cools and the fall foliage blooms, there is no better way to welcome autumn than listening to live music, drinking authentic German beer, and eating bratwurst and giant pretzels. Munich comes to New York City with tons of Oktoberfest events starting this month throughout the five boroughs, including some just a little further out of town. Celebrate Bavarian culture this year with events like traditional pig roasts, ceremonial keg tappings, “oompah” bands, stein-holding competitions and much more. Ahead, revel in the tradition of Oktoberfest and find the 15 best spots to grab authentic brews and brats this season with 6sqft’s guide.

Beers and Brats this way

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Long Island City

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , September 21, 2017

Rendering of the Hayden, courtesy of Rockrose Development

The second batch of affordable apartments is now available at the Hayden, a 50-story, 924-unit highrise in the blossoming neighborhood of Long Island City in Queens. Designed by SCLE Architects, the building at 43-25 Hunter Street features amenities like a fitness center, yoga room, basketball court, rooftop solarium, screening room, library and more. Qualifying New Yorkers earning between $34,355 and $57,240 can apply for $947 per month studios, $1,017 per month one-bedrooms and the $1,230 per month two-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

Policy, Transportation

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , September 21, 2017

When the Second Avenue Subway opened this past New Year’s Day, it was nothing short of a miracle. Not only had the $4 billion infrastructure project been 100 years in the making but in the months leading up to its deadline, there was much talk about delays related to the system’s “rigorous testing schedule” not being met. As it turns out, the testing wasn’t met; the Times tells us that when the train opened on January 1st, “the fire alarm system was still being tested and more than 17,000 defects found during inspections had not been fixed.” And eight months later, the train is still operating under a temporary safety certificate.

Get all the details

Midtown West, New Developments, Top Stories

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , September 21, 2017

Five Manhattan West. Rendering via Millerhare.

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced today that tech giant Amazon will be growing its presence in New York City. The company just signed a lease for a 359,000-square-foot administrative office at Five Manhattan West, Brookfield Property Partners’ 16-story, 1.8 million-square-foot Skidmore, Owings & Merrill-designed building located on Tenth Avenue between 31st and 33rd Streets. The new addition is expected to create 2,000 new jobs in finance, sales, marketing, and information technology. The offices will be the main New York location for Amazon Advertising, which handles sales, marketing, product, design, engineering and more. “We’re excited to expand our presence in New York–we have always found great talent here,” said Paul Kotas, Amazon’s Senior Vice President of Worldwide Advertising.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Interiors, Prospect Heights

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , September 21, 2017

Given the renovation fever that has swept the city’s historic neighborhoods, it sometimes seems rare to see a home like this one, built at the turn century in a Neo-Gothic style, that retains its grandeur after being designed and remodeled into a picture of 21st century city living perfection. This four-story Prospect Heights townhouse at 577 Carlton Avenue, currently asking $3.495 million, has retained its historic details, while color, texture and inspired design decisions elevate it above many of its more ordinary brownstone Brooklyn neighbors.

Take the tour

Featured Story

Art, Features, Midtown West, People, Video

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , September 20, 2017

Adrian Untermyer plaing the piano, via Sing for Hope

Smack in the middle of the busiest bus terminal in the world is a funky, rainbow piano. Located on a platform that was once the terminal’s operations control center but is now the Port Authority Bus Terminal Performing Arts Stage, the piano arrived last year via a collaboration with the nonprofit Sing for Hope. But the idea for this public performance opportunity is thanks to pianist and preservationist Adrian Untermyer, who originally saw pianos in train stations in Paris and thought it would be a great way to bring “light and joy and music to a space that we all know but may not particularly love.” In the video ahead, Adrian tells us how his proposal became a reality and why Port Authority deserved a piano.

Watch 6sqft’s video here

City Living, History

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , September 20, 2017

A rainy NYC day, photo courtesy of dalioPhoto on Flickr

While it appears New York City avoided much of Hurricane Jose’s wrath this week, experiencing only slight showers and mild winds, New Yorkers weren’t as lucky on an autumn day in 1882. According to the National Weather Service, Sept. 23, 1882 is considered the rainiest day in New York City’s history, with 8.28 inches of rainfall recorded (h/t NY Times). As a Times article reported from the record-setting wet event: “Umbrellas were useless, and most of the thin rubber over-garments proved of little service in excluding the drenching, penetrating streams which hit the wayfarer from above and below, and, for that matter, in front and behind as well.”

More this way

Cool Listings, Financial District, Top Stories

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , September 20, 2017

Rendering of the Pinnacle via Williams New York

When the neo-Gothic Woolworth Building was erected in 1913 as the world’s tallest building, it cost a total of $13.5 million. Now, 104 years and a partial condo conversion later, its massive, seven-story penthouse has hit the market for an exorbitant $110 million. The Wall Street Journal first got wind of the not-yet-public listing, which could be the most expensive sale ever downtown, far surpassing the current $50.9 million record at Chelsea’s Walker Tower. Dubbed the Pinnacle for its location in the 792-foot tower’s iconic green copper crown, the penthouse will encompass 9,710 square feet and boast a private elevator, 24-foot ceilings, a 400-square-foot open observatory, and views in every direction, from the World Trade Center to New Jersey to the East River.

More details ahead

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