MORE TOP STORIES

affordable housing, Policy

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , October 15, 2019

Image via Pexels

State Sen. Brian Benjamin has proposed a bill that aims to give New York renters a much-needed break. The Harlem Democrat’s bill is modeled after the federal version proposed by Sen. Kamala Harris and would entitle lower-income tenants to a refundable tax credit if their rent and utilities account for a significant portion–over 30 percent–of their income, the Daily News reports.

Find out more

Lower East Side, New Developments

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , October 15, 2019

Map data © 2019 Google

A developer this month filed an application with the city to build a 30-story condo building next to a landmarked nursing home on the Lower East Side. The plan comes a year after developer Round Square failed to obtain air rights from the Seward Park Cooperative to build two towers at 232 East Broadway, adjacent to the Bialystoker Nursing Home. After ditching the original two-building project, Round Square is now moving forward with a proposed one tower that will contain 54 condos, as Patch reported.

Details here

Art, Design, Harlem

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , October 15, 2019

Renderings by Focus Lighting

Harlem-based architectural lighting firm Focus Lighting has worked on some pretty impressive projects here in NYC, from the Times Square ball to the Waldorf Astoria. But they’re also getting involved in their local community, thinking about how they can transform the Riverside Drive Viaduct–a 50-foot-tall elevated steel roadway that runs from 125th to 135th Streets. As the firm notes, during the day, the structure’s grand arches serve as a picturesque background to the neighborhood and the Hudson River, but at night, they “go completely unlit and unutilized.” Their proposal, called The Arches of Harlem, seeks to incorporate a new programmable lighting composition every three months, each one “inspired by select works of historic artists and emerging local talent.”

Read more

Cool Listings, Ditmas Park, Interiors

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , October 15, 2019

Photos by Melanie Greene, Courtesy of Compass

Built around 1910, this charming Victorian home at 699 East 18th Street in the Fiske Terrace-Midwood Park Historic District of Brooklyn has over 4,900 square feet of interior space–more than enough room for family and friends on four floors. With a basement greenhouse and home office, a two-car garage and private driveway, a lovely back patio, and a gracious front porch, there’s room for everyone’s hobbies, too. The house, asking $2.25 million, is filled with well-preserved architectural details like high beamed and coffered ceilings, stained glass, and working gas fireplaces.

Take the tour

condos, Construction Update, Lower East Side, New Developments

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , October 15, 2019

Photo credit: QuallsBenson

The Essex Crossing mega-development hit another milestone this week, with its seventh building topping out at the Lower East Side site. The mixed-use tower at 202 Broome Street includes 83 luxury condominiums, 175,000 square feet of office space, and 34,500 square feet of retail space. Designed by CetraRuddy, the building joins 242 Broome as the nine-site development’s second condo building.

Get the details

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Williamsburg

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , October 15, 2019

Photo by Korye Logan on Flickr

A lottery launched on Tuesday for 17 middle-income units at a new building in Brooklyn. Located at 188 Humboldt Street, the rental borders Williamsburg and Bushwick and sits just one block from the L train at Montrose Avenue. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 130 percent of the area median income can apply for the apartments, which range from a $2,176/month studio to a $2,758/month two-bedroom apartment.

Find out if you qualify

Design, Museums, Top Stories

See inside MoMA’s $450M revamped, expanded campus

By Devin Gannon, Mon, October 14, 2019

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , October 14, 2019

53rd Street Elevation; Photo by Brett Beyer, courtesy of Diller Scofidio + Renfro

Following the completion of a $450 million renovation project, the Museum of Modern Art is set to reopen next week on October 21. In addition to expanding gallery space by nearly 50,000 square feet, the project reorganized the layout of exhibits, which now will be displayed chronologically instead of by discipline. Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Gensler, the new museum expanded west into the former site of the American Folk Art Museum and within the base of Jean Nouvel’s new residential tower, 53W53.

See inside

Art, Policy

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , October 14, 2019

Image via Governor Cuomo’s Flickr

Despite garnering the most votes in a public poll, Mother Frances Cabrini will not be memorialized as part of the She Built NYC program run by First Lady Chirlane McCray. Controversy has followed the decision to not include Cabrini in recent days, with Mayor Bill de Blasio stepping in to suggest she would be a contender in future editions of the program during The Brian Lehrer Show last Friday. Gov. Andrew Cuomo responded by calling the decision an “affront” to the Italian-American community. During Monday’s Columbus Day Parade, the governor announced a new state commission that will lead the creation of a separate memorial for Cabrini.

More details

Chelsea, Cool Listings

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , October 14, 2019

Rendering: Spotless Agency, courtesy of Compass

This light-filled Chelsea loft co-op at 100 West 15th Street offers original details remaining from its early factory days, like soaring 12-foot ceilings, massive windows, exposed brick, exposed wood beams, and an original metal column. The apartment, asking $1.39 million, is the result of combining two studios, with plenty of open loft space for creating a home, plus a level of lofted storage above.

Lofty ideas, this way

Featured Story

Behind the Scenes, Features, More Top Stories, Union Square

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , October 14, 2019

All photos by James and Karla Murray exclusively for 6sqft.

When the Union Square Greenmarket opened in 1976 as GrowNYC’s second-ever market, there were only seven farmers set up. At the time, the area was quite empty and crime-ridden, but the market, along with the opening of Danny Meyer’s Union Square Cafe and a major renovation by the city in the ’80s, is credited with turning Union Square into the vibrant hub that we now know.

Today, there can be as many as 140 vendors, selling everything from produce to fish to meat to cheese to lavender, as well as 60,000 shoppers (and local chefs!) on a given day. And though every season is beautiful and fruitful at the market, fall is perhaps the most colorful, which is why photographers James and Karla Murray thought it would be the perfect time to capture the essence of the market and get to know some of the vendors personally.

Take a tour and watch a special video

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