MORE TOP STORIES

Design, Furniture

Transformable Ollie chair unfurls with the pull of a string

By Michelle Cohen, Thu, February 23, 2017

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , February 23, 2017

If you’ve ever wished an ergonomic, well-designed comfortable chair would materialize when you need it, the Ollie Chair has your back. Ollie is a transformable seat that unfurls and retracts with no more than the pull of a string. Created by Brooklyn Navy Yard-based kinetic furniture company RockPaperRobot, the chair offers a portable, elegant and comfortable solution for today’s office-anywhere work style–and its customizable cool design makes it a welcome addition to your decor.

So where can I get one?

Landscape Architecture, Staten Island, Urban Design

  • By Diane Pham
  • , February 23, 2017

Although High Line Park visionary Robert Hammond recently expressed remorse for failing to develop a park that was “for the neighborhood”—not the ultra-wealthy that have infiltrated the blocks directly surrounding the elevated marvel—other cities continue to see nothing but financial opportunity in thrusting parkland upward. 6sqft recently reported on Newark, NJ, which will soon break ground on their own version of the High Line in hopes of revitalizing their long-burdened downtown, and now the Staten Island Economic Development Corp. (SIEDC) has announced that Port Richmond is angling for their own High Line magic atop .53 miles of abandoned North Shore rail line.

more details and photos here

Architecture, New Developments, New Jersey, Starchitecture

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , February 23, 2017

Residential Building VII, via Scott Frances

With Hoboken long gone and Jersey City well in the throes of gentrification, it makes sense that Newark is the next New Jersey city poised for a renaissance. Not only is it easily accessible via both NJ Transit and the PATH, but its wealth of former industrial buildings lend themselves to a DUMBO-esque revitalization. In the up-and-coming downtown area, Newark native Richard Meier is behind Teachers Village, a 23-acre, mixed-use complex that is well on its way to restoring a sense of community to the neighborhood. The $150 million project will encompass three charter schools, ground-level retail, and 204 residential units with a preference given to educators, all located in six new buildings designed in the starchitect’s signature style of white materials and gridded facades.

All the renderings and details this way

Daily Link Fix

  • The Renwick Hotel opened its Gertrude Stein Suite, the first in the historic building dedicated to a female author. [Conde Naste Traveler]
  • Though Mayor de Blasio asked for $35 million in federal funding to cover Trump Tower security for 73 days, it actually only cost $25 million. [Gothamist]
  • The Frank Lloyd Wright Revival Initiative wants to construct the architect’s unbuilt and demolished buildings. [Architect Magazine]
  • When the High Line’s Spur opens in 2018, it will feature monumental works of public art. Now on view are 12 small-scale versions of what may come. [CityLab]
  • The gritty history of the Elk Hotel, one of Times Square’s last pay-by-the-hour hotels. [Untapped]
  • NYPD’s media sensation “Hipster Cop” is retiring after 25 years. [Metro]

Bell Machine by Jonathan Berger, via Friends of the High Line

 

Cool Listings, Interiors, Prospect-Lefferts Gardens

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , February 23, 2017

This three-story brick townhouse is nestled on a charming street of Prospect Lefferts Gardens, the Brooklyn neighborhood east of Prospect Park. 88 Midwood Street also has some nice surprises inside, like carved woodwork, a big wood burning fireplace and a bonus sunroom. If you’re on the hunt for a lovely Brooklyn townhouse with some historic details still in tact—and have $2.399 million to spare—look no further.

See more

Events, Midtown

  • By Diane Pham
  • , February 23, 2017

Come March 1st the Waldorf Astoria will close its doors to the public in preparation for what’s likely to be a lengthy conversion, as the New York icon transforms from luxury hotel to a collection of luxury condos. While we can all rest assured that the hotel’s stunning interiors will remain intact—from the historic ballrooms to exhibition space, dining rooms and banquet rooms—what will likely disappear for good (at least in its current form) are the lavish brunches held at Peacock Alley. As Metro NY reports, this Sunday, February 26th, will be your last opportunity to indulge in the hotel’s utterly decadent weekend offering.

more details here

affordable housing, gentrification, Top Stories, Urban Design

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , February 23, 2017

Image: mx.org

We’ve definitely seen a lifetime’s worth of the trajectory that runs from warehouse to art studio to luxury loft, starting with neighborhoods like Soho and picking up speed as developers got into the act, anticipating the next “it” enclave with manageable rents attracting the young and creative. A team of New York-based designers developed a proposal for reaping the benefits of economic growth in the city’s industrial areas without pricing out all but the wealthiest players. Soft City reports the details of this “mission-driven gentrification” concept, which suggests an all-new development model for the city’s manufacturing neighborhoods (known as M1 districts), helmed by mission-based organizations and a building typology that caters to small businesses and artists.

Bright ideas, this way

affordable housing, Bronx, New Developments

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , February 23, 2017

Yesterday, mental health nonprofit Community Access broke ground on a new, $52.2 million supportive and affordable housing complex in the Mount Eden neighborhood of the Bronx. Located at 111 East 172nd Street, the building has 126 units, 60 of which will be set aside for Medicaid high-need individuals with mental health concerns and 65 for low-income families. It incorporates sustainable elements such as solar panels and a co-generation plant, as well as health-focused amenities like a community garden and kitchen to encourage and teach about healthy eating, outdoor exercise equipment, and a bike sharing program.

Find out more

Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

  • By Lori Zimmer
  • , February 23, 2017

Toilet Paper Paradise by Plamen Pletkov

In a city where hundreds of interesting events occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top picks for 6sqft readers!

If you haven’t been to the Cadillac House–the cultural venue by the car company–now is the time to check it out, as two artists take over the space with room-sized installations perfect for Instragramming. Mo Scarpelli’s compelling documentary about journalists in Afghanistan plays at St. Bartholomew’s Church, and Amelie plays at Videology. Get an insider’s tour of the historic New Yorker Hotel, then stay after hours at the gorgeous New York Public Library. The famed Salmagundi Club will stay open all night for a draw-a-thon, and the Bronx Museum of the Arts hosts another great Gala at the Conrad. Finally, Beau Stanton transforms his artwork into a special stop-motion film at Brilliant Champions.

More on all the best events this way

Chinatown, New Developments

  • By Diane Pham
  • , February 23, 2017

If you’ve walked down Chinatown’s Canal Street then you’re certainly familiar with a string of stores at 312-322 Canal Street hawking cheap souvenirs to tourists and passersby. After a proposal to renew the depressed stretch of shops—which underwent its own covert, illegal renovation in 2010—with a brand-new brick construction failed to pass Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) muster in 2011, a new, much more ambitious plan to replace the ramshackle building has finally emerged.

more details this way

Architecture, Green Design, Meatpacking District, New Developments, Starchitecture, Top Stories

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , February 23, 2017

Just yesterday, 6sqft shared the news that Jeanne Gang‘s first ground-up project in NYC–the Solar Carve Tower at 40 Tenth Avenue–had begun construction along the High Line. Now, the Post shares new renderings of the jewel-like, glassy structure, which is so named for its employment of the firm’s strategy that uses the sun’s angles to shape a building. Along with these views of its chiseled edges, connection to the park, terraces, and interior spaces, comes word that developers Aurora Capital and William Gottlieb Real Estate have tapped Bruce Mosler of Cushman & Wakefield to begin leasing the 139,000-square-foot, 12-story boutique office building in anticipation of its 2019 opening.

Lots more details and renderings ahead

Cool Listings, Gramercy Park, Interiors

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , February 23, 2017

At a house-sized 3,809 square feet, this jumbo co-op at 50 Gramercy Park North, on the market for $9.5 million, is likely two apartments that were combined. As a result, there’s more room for bedrooms, living and entertaining space and more floor-to-ceiling glass to take in the view. The building is also home to the Gramercy Park Hotel, so you get hotel-level amenities as part of the deal, along with a coveted key to the park.

Big rooms and big views this way

Brooklyn Heights, Cool Listings, Historic Homes, More Top Stories

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , February 22, 2017

Built in 1824, 24 Middagh Street is a charming, wood-frame, Federal house in Brooklyn Heights that has the distinction of being the oldest home in the neighborhood. And it’s just gotten a price chop to $6,650,000 (it first listed this past September for the first time in nearly 60 years, asking $7 million). The listing says most of the original interior details–like wood floors, fireplaces, and moldings–are intact, and the five-bedroom residence even comes with a landscaped backyard and separate, two-bedroom carriage house.

More on the home this way

Coney Island, History, Video

  • By Rebecca Paul
  • , February 22, 2017

Cycling culture in New York City has been a growing trend for over 20 years. However, its popularity and the bike lanes of modern day New York have yet to reach the impressive status of Coney Island’s 1920s bicycle racing Velodrome. The Velodrome was a wooden racetrack that seated approximately 10,000 people, each of whom came to cheer or jeer the area’s best cyclists.

more details here

Connecticut, Historic Homes, More Top Stories

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , February 22, 2017

In 2004, New York-based developer and builder Frank Sciame paid $6 million for the 3.4-acre waterfront Connecticut estate of the late Katharine Hepburn. In late 2015, he also dropped $290,000 at auction for the Old Saybrook Breakwater Lighthouse, which is within walking distance to the estate. The 131-year-old lighthouse was built in 1886 to mark a sand bar on the west side of the Connecticut River, but it will soon see a new life as a giant children’s playroom. The Post reports that Sciame asked yacht-design architects Persak & Wurmfeld to redesign the structure as a clubhouse for his grandkids, complete with the original cast-iron windows and portholes, watch room and lantern room, and upper wrap-around deck.

Get the full scoop

From Our Partners

The top 20 most congested cities when it comes to traffic

By Metro New York, Wed, February 22, 2017

  • By Metro New York
  • , February 22, 2017

Rush hour traffic is as predictable as the sun setting at night for New Yorkers, but drivers might be shocked to find out how many hours tick away while they’re stuck behind the wheel. On average, New York City drivers spend 89 hours a year in traffic, making it the third most congested city in the world, according to a recent global traffic study by INRIX. Los Angeles earned bragging rights as the most congested city on the planet, with drivers spending an average of 104 hours a year in traffic. Coming in at number two was Moscow, with 91 hours spent in traffic annually.

MORE DETAILS AT METRO NEW YORK…

Daily Link Fix

  • The Driverless Future Challenge seeks proposals that actively shape the city’s response to driverless cars. [Blank Space]
  • Gwyneth Paltrow is opening her second 3 Green Hearts cafe in Midtown, which will serve gluten-free kale ravioli and “healthy” frosting shots and offer a meal delivery service from partner Tracy Anderson. [Eater]
  • Find out how to win an unlimited MetroCard for a full year just by sending a text. [Pix 11]
  • The DOT and MTA plan to release their decision on an L train replacement this fall. Options include car-free streets and the East River Skyway. [Streetsblog]
  • While congress is in recess this week, many are holding community meetings. This Town Hall Tracker helps find those in your area. [WNYC]
  • Get a look inside the new Harlem home of the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute, located in an abandoned historic firehouse. [Untapped]

Cool Listings, Greenwich Village, Historic Homes, Interiors

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , February 22, 2017

The listing brags that this Greenwich Village co-op looks like something out of a movie, and we’d have to agree. A two-year restoration of this apartment, which occupies the third floor of the 1839 Greek Revival townhouse 158 Waverly Place, left the 2,000-square-foot space looking gorgeous. Historic details are paired with both intricate wallpaper patterns and modern amenities. The apartment, too, has hosted a notable crew of residents. The townhouse was built for Lambert Suydam, the former president of Manhattan Gas & Light Co., and then the third floor was later occupied by Oscar winning actress Judy Holliday between 1948 and 1952. The latest owner, Thomas Ruff, is a German photographer who purchased it in 2006 for $1.65 million, according to public records. And now the co-op can be rented for $12,495 a month.

Take a look

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Hell's Kitchen, Interiors

  • By Annie Doge
  • , February 22, 2017

Industrial designer/architect (and lover of all things pink and white) Karim Rashid once told 6sqft, “Color is life and for me, color is a way of dealing with and touching our emotions, our psyche, and our spiritual being,” and this philosophy is clearly on display in his personal Hell’s Kitchen home. If you’re a fan of this quirky aesthetic, you’re in luck; Curbed tells us that Rashid’s super-sleek townhouse-condo at The Dillon recently hit the market for $4.75 million.

Take a tour of the whole place

Architecture, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Morningside Heights

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , February 22, 2017

On Tuesday the Landmarks Preservation Commission voted unanimously to designate the 125-year-old Cathedral Church of St. John The Divine, the world’s largest cathedral; in addition, 115 neighboring buildings became the Morningside Heights Historic District. The designated district runs from West 109th to 119th streets between Riverside Drive and Amsterdam Avenue and includes the famously unfinished cathedral and surrounding campus. With the designation, calendared by the LPC in September, comes a 3-D online map that provides more information about the buildings in the district, most of which were constructed between 1900 and 1910, including townhouses dating back to the late 1800s as well as pre-war apartment buildings.

Find out more

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