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Events, Restaurants

Try food from all 30 MLB ballparks in NYC next month

By Devin Gannon, Today, August 23, 2019

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 23, 2019

Photo by Kevin Harber on Flickr

Forget the peanuts and Cracker Jacks. A food festival coming to New York City next month will serve out-of-the-box ballpark food from all 30 Major League Baseball teams, from toasted grasshoppers to bulgogi beef egg rolls. In its second year, the MLB FoodFest, presented by Budweiser, will take place on Sept. 21 and 22 in Midtown. Tickets cost $35 for unlimited vendor tastings or $50 for food and three beers.

Calling all baseball lovers

Design, Long Island City, Queens

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 23, 2019

Photo by Vitali Ogorodnikov for 6sqft

The long-awaited Hunters Point Library will open in Long Island City next month, more than eight years after its futuristic design was revealed, library officials announced Thursday. Designed by Steven Holl Architects, the concrete building with carved windows sits on the East River and boasts sweeping Manhattan views. After many construction and financial delays, the library will officially open on September 24.

More here

condos, lincoln square, New Developments, Upper West Side 

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , August 23, 2019

Renderings courtesy of Binyan Studios

Last week, construction of the residential floors at 200 Amsterdam Avenue topped out and now we’re getting a little peek at what the luxury, CetraRuddy-designed interiors will look like. There will be a total of 112 apartments in the controversial Upper West Side tower, including eight full-floor residences and two duplex penthouses. Sales are set to launch in September, with prices starting at $2.625 million for a one-bedroom and exceeding $40 million for the penthouses.

More details

Featured Story

Features, Flushing, History

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , August 23, 2019

Photo via Wiki Commons

Now in its 51st year, U.S. Open fever has once again swept the city. Though nowadays it’s all Venus and Djokovic and craft beers and lobster rolls, there’s a long history behind the world-famous event. Here, 6sqft takes a look at how the international tournament made its way from an elite, private club in Newport Rhode Island to Forest Hills’ West Side Tennis Club and finally to its current home in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, even uncovering a little connection to the 1964 World’s Fair.

All the tennis history right this way

Central Park South, Cool Listings

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , August 23, 2019

Photo Credit: Zigna for Sotheby’s International Realty.

This one-bedroom co-op in the Osborne at 205 West 57th Street is situated on what’s now known as Billionaires’ Row, and for well under $1 million you can include bragging rights to one of the New York City’s finest historic residential buildings. Built in 1883 and designated an official city landmark in 1991, the Osborne also boasts one of the city’s most sumptuous and dazzling lobbies.

Take a look

Architecture, Cool Listings, Green Design, Upstate

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , August 22, 2019

Image credit: Deborah De Graffenreid for Hudson Woods.

The last house in the Hudson Woods modern development is for sale. The $1.18 million home was, like its neighbors in the 131-acre Hudson Valley community, designed by Lang Architecture with a modern aesthetic, quality craftsmanship and premium finishes. The 26-family community was constructed in a scenic corner of the Catskills characterized by wooded rolling hills and a large river; it’s a two-hour drive from New York City.

See more, this way

Midtown, Restaurants

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , August 22, 2019

Rendering of the Market Building from 2017 LPC presentation materials by Gensler

The creator behind City Point’s DeKalb Market Hall has signed a 15-year lease to open a 10,000-square-foot food hall at the retail annex of the landmarked Citigroup tower at 601 Lexington Avenue. As The Real Deal reported, Anna Castellani’s company, Local Culture Management, opened the popular Downtown Brooklyn market in 2017 with 40 vendors. She’s expected to bring a similar vibe to Midtown with her latest creation, which will be called “The Hugh” and is scheduled to open in just three to four months.

More details ahead

Architecture, Astoria, New Developments, Rentals

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , August 22, 2019

30-77 Vernon Boulevard. Renderings by Pax Brooklyn, courtesy of Fogarty Finger

A sprawling new residential development at 30-77 Vernon Boulevard from Cape Advisors and Wainbridge Capital will bring over 500 rental apartments to the Astoria waterfront area (h/t Yimby). The 522,000-square-foot construction site on two-and-a-half acres of land will be comprised of three adjacent buildings designed by Fogarty Finger. New renderings show a white and gray façade with rooftop recreation areas; amenity spaces will include a private courtyard, indoor and outdoor lounges, a fitness center and a rooftop pool East River and Manhattan skyline views.

Find out more

Celebrities, Cool Listings

  • By Annie Doge
  • , August 22, 2019

Photo of Andrew Cuomo via Wikimedia; Photo of Sandra Lee via Wikimedia; Listing photos courtesy of Houlihan Lawrence

Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his longtime girlfriend, cookbook author and TV chef Sandra Lee, are selling their four-bedroom country home in Westchester. Lee, who recently denied rumors that the couple had split, told the New York Times that they no longer need the large house because the governor’s three daughters are now adults. The four-bedroom home in Mount Kisco sits on a tranquil three acres, which include a pond and gazebo. The pair originally listed the home at the end of May for $2 million, but it’s now received a price chop to $1,699,000, according to lohud.

Get a look inside

Featured Story

Art, Features, Greenwich Village, Manhattan

  • By Andrew Berman of Village Preservation
  • , August 22, 2019

Many artists have been inspired by the scenes of life in New York City, particularly Lower Manhattan. But perhaps no artist captures the feeling of New York during the hot, heavy days of August like the painter John Sloan. Sloan was one of the leading figures of the “Ashcan School” of artists of the early 20th century, a loosely-defined movement which took its name from a derisive reference to the supposed lowbrow quality and themes of their work, and the smudgy, impressionistic brushstrokes they utilized. His workaday subjects and hazy images of city life capture the heaviness of the air of New York during its dog days. Here’s a look at some of those paintings of life in our city 100 years ago.

See NYC through the eyes of Sloan

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Lior Barak and Christine Blackburn PRESENT A THREE-PART SERIES

The Italian side of Williamsburg: History, famous joints, and today’s culture

  • By Michelle Cohen

Photo via Flickr cc

A bustling Brooklyn enclave that is today an impossibly trendy and diverse mix of glassy condos, hip new restaurants and storefronts, and unassuming multi-family homes in the northeast section of Williamsburg was one of New York City’s notable Italian-American neighborhoods for much of the 20th century. While it may not have the tourist cachet of Manhattan’s Little Italy–or the old-fashioned village-y coziness of Carroll Gardens–this swath of the ‘burg, bounded roughly by Montrose, Union, Richardson, and Humboldt Streets, was a little bit of Italy in its own right from the 1800s until as late as the 1990s. The north end of Graham Avenue was even christened Via Vespucci to commemorate the historic Italian-American community.

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