MORE TOP STORIES

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Upstate

After General George Custer perished in Little Big Horn in 1876 (Custer’s Last Stand), his widow Elizabeth Bacon Custer moved to New York amid her quest to salvage her late husband’s legacy through her three books, “Tenting on the Plains,” “Boots and Saddles,” and “Following the Guidon.” In 1902, after attainting recognition and financial success through her writing, Elizabeth commissioned a massive Colonial-style home in Bronxville. Located in the high-end Lawrence Park neighborhood, the landmarked mansion boasts six period fireplaces, seven bedrooms, turreted rooms, “whimsical nooks and crannies,” a large wine cellar, and landscaped gardens surrounding stone terraces and pathways.

Tour the historic home

Chelsea, Cool Listings

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , December 8, 2016

This second-floor walk-up at 235 West 18th Street is about as much like an average NYC rental apartment as you could get for a month or two in town, which is clearly the intended purpose of this furnished Chelsea pad. The listing states that it’s available for one to twelve months, but there are towels on the beds, AirBnB-style, along with other bare-bones necessities. Knowing that makes it seem a lot more acceptable that one of the apartment’s two “flex” bedrooms appears to be in an actual closet—which isn’t so bad if you’re only in town for the holidays. And to be fair, whole rooms in some of the city’s hipper boutique hotels appear to be in closets also. The listing says the apartment “comfortably sleeps 4,” which apparently means at $3,500 you’re getting a pretty good bargain.

Make yourself right at home

Flatiron, Interiors, More Top Stories

  • By Rebecca Paul
  • , December 7, 2016

Located in the Flatiron District of Manhattan, this massive loft measuring an incredible 4,500 square feet was designed specifically by NYC-based Frampton Co. to meet the needs of a young family. Its transformation was realized through a collaboration between the designer and client in a series of projects spanning a decade. Updates over the ten years have included everything from the initial property scouting and spatial arrangement, to transforming the bedrooms into nurseries, to adding a playroom and library to the already amenity-laden space.

Read more

Daily Link Fix

  • Mayor de Blasio signed 10 pieces of legislation related to gas safety to ensure another Second Avenue explosion doesn’t take place. [Curbed]
  • The Lot Radio, which operates out of a shipping container in Williamsburg, has added a vintage bus to its property that’ll serve as a bar. [Bedford + Bowery]
  • Preview Dwell and Target’s line of affordable modern furniture and home accessories. [Curbed]
  • A nine-vendor food court, a la the trendy “food halls” of Manhattan and Brooklyn, opened in Flushing’s Queens Crossing mall. [Eater]
  • For some reason, KFC released a candle to make your house smell like fried chicken. [Mental Floss]

 

Featured Story

Events, Features, holidays

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , December 7, 2016

From the swarms of tourists, long lines at stores, and increased prices on everything from theater tickets to cocktails, the holidays in New York can be more of a headache than anything. But fear not–there are plenty more ways to get festive other than battling the crowds at Rockefeller Center or paying an arm and a leg to see the Rockettes. 6sqft has rounded up a dozen alternative events, including a sexy rendition of the Nutcracker, an exhibit of Santa’s history in NYC, a latke festival, and a special Kwanzaa dance performance.

All the events this way

Cool Listings, Interiors, West Village 

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , December 7, 2016

Here’s an opportunity for a New Yorker not afraid to renovate. Two small one-bedroom apartments at 41 Perry Street, in the West Village, are being offered as a package with the opportunity to combine them into one larger pad. The listing promises that the transformation into a two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment will be easy—it’s been done several times before in this building—but it’ll cost $1.41 million with renovation costs on top of that. Separately, each apartment is asking $715,000 and $695,000.

Take a look at both

Architecture, History, Midtown East, Top Stories

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , December 7, 2016

Images: Lemessurier and 6sqft

The Midtown building formerly known as Citicorp Center has just been designated a city landmark. The building, now known simply as 601 Lexington Avenue, is one of 12 buildings in Midtown East to be given landmark status by the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission. This newest batch of landmarks brings the number of official historic buildings in the area to 50, Curbed reports. The 59-story office and retail tower, designed by Hugh A. Stubbins & Associates, was completed in 1978. It was considered quite innovative for its time, with distinctive features that included a 45-degree angular roof and a base of four stilt-like columns. The latter allowed it to cantilever over Saint Peter’s Church, also on the site. There is also a privately owned public space that connects the buildings to the Lexington Avenue-53rd Street subway station.

The distinctive tower will be dwarfed, but preserved

Featured Story

apartment living 101, Design, Features, holidays, Products

10 modern menorah designs for Hanukkah 2016

By Rebecca Paul, Wed, December 7, 2016

  • By Rebecca Paul
  • , December 7, 2016

Our ongoing series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. In anticipation of Hanukkah, we’ve rounded up ten modern menorahs for the design-minded. 

For thousands of years, people all over the globe have been celebrating Hanukkah (a.k.a. Festival of Lights), and this year’s festivities are just around the corner. While the holiday invites participants to join in on a variety of joyful traditions like playing dreidel and eating potato pancakes, the eight-night event is centered around the lighting of the menorah. From emojis and dinosaurs, to elegant branches and minimal blocks, you can find a menorah in almost any style these days—so why not give the ancient nine-tiered a contemporary update? To help you find the right menorah design for your living space, we’ve rounded up ten of our favorite modern takes on the centerpiece.

have a look at all 10 here

Technology, Top Stories, Transportation

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , December 7, 2016

NYC Subway riders will soon be less able to blame their subway commute for not being able to immediately answer that all-important email or text.

Last January 6sqft highlighted Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s plan to get all MTA subway stations connected with free Wi-Fi by the end of this year as part of a comprehensive plan to upgrade subway infrastructure. According to AMNewYork, plans to implement free Wi-Fi in all 279 of the city’s subway stations are on track for the end of this year; as of Tuesday, 250 of them are already up and running.

It’s all part of an ambitious plan

Midtown East, real estate trends

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , December 7, 2016

432 Park Avenue may be the tallest residential building in the western hemisphere and home to the most expensive apartment closing this year, but throughout 2016, the tower’s ultra-luxury condos were selling at an average discount of 10 percent, according to an analysis by appraiser Miller Samuel Inc. for Bloomberg. And a recent transaction saw an even greater price cut; Lewis Sanders, founder and CEO of Sanders Capital and former CEO of AllianceBernstein, bought an 88th floor penthouse for $60.9 million, 20 percent less than its $76.5 asking price.

What’s the deal?

Celebrities, Midtown

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , December 7, 2016

Just two days after Mayor de Blasio formally requested $35 million in federal funding to cover security at Trump Tower for the 73 days from the November 8th election to inauguration day on January 20th, republicans in Congress decided to earmark a mere $7 million towards protecting the President Elect while he’s in the Big Apple. Of the pending decision, the Mayor said, “NYC taxpayers shouldn’t be on the hook for 80 percent of the national bill to protect Trump Tower. DC must step up to pay us back what we’re owed,” reports the Post.

The full scoop

Chelsea, Cool Listings, Meatpacking District

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , December 7, 2016

This Chelsea-meets-Meatpacking studio at 221 West 14th Street checks the boxes for charm, neighborhood amenities and convenience, and it possesses that elusive bonus item: an attractive outdoor space with at least enough room for a rosé al fresco. For $845,000 it’s not exactly a steal, though if neighborhood comps are a factor—which of course they are—then it becomes one. The second-floor townhouse condominium’s layout works, allowing the space to be a small studio, yet solving the problem of having your bed next to the fridge.

What else do we love about it?

Featured Story

building of the year, Features, New Developments

Vote for 6sqft’s 2016 Building of the Year!

By 6sqft, Wed, December 7, 2016

  • By 6sqft
  • , December 7, 2016

For new developments, 2015 was the year of reveals, but 2016 was all about watching these buildings reshape our city. Ahead we’ve narrowed a list of 12 news-making residential structures, each noted for their distinctive design, blockbuster prices, or their game-changing potential on the skyline or NYC neighborhoods.

Which of these you think deserves 6sqft’s title of 2016 Building of the Year? Have your say below. Polls for our third annual competition will be open up until 11:59 p.m., Sunday, December 11th*, and we will announce the winner on Tuesday, December 13th!

Learn more about each of the buildings in the running here

City Living, holidays, Video

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , December 6, 2016

One of the many signs that it’s Christmastime in the city is the sight, sound and scent of the city’s sidewalk tree vendors. The annual arrival of the (mostly) jovial tree purveyors reminds us that bell-ringing Santas, office secret Santas, and bar-crawling Santas aren’t far behind. Each year thousands of trees are sold to New Yorkers to help them deck the halls for the season. But what about the people who sell those trees? A new documentary film, “Tree Man,” gives us a peek at the lives of the city’s tree sellers, many of whom leave families behind to camp out in sometimes harsh living conditions for the sake of their business.

Watch a trailer for ‘Tree Man’

From Our Partners, holidays

The department store windows of Midtown aren’t the only place to see holiday masterpieces. This Tuesday is the opening reception for Wreath Interpretations, the Arsenal Gallery’s long-running show that invites anyone from the community to submit designs for their own take on the traditional holiday symbol. In its 34th year, the exhibit will feature more than 40 contributors ranging from fine artists and designers to regular New Yorkers.

FIND OUT MORE AT METRO NEW YORK…

Cool Listings, Gramercy Park, Interiors

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , December 6, 2016

Over at 160 East 26th Street in Gramercy Park you’ll find quite this charming one-bedroom apartment with some outdoor space and a decent price tag. The apartment–which is one of the most compact triplex units we’ve ever seen–is asking $850,000. On the first level it manages it hold a living area, dining area and kitchen, then there’s a bedroom above, and finally a private roof deck that is sure to charm you.

Take a look inside

Daily Link Fix

  • Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner are house hunting in D.C., fueling rumors that Kushner will serve as an advisor to Donald Trump. [CNN]
  • Sculptor Anish Kapoor bought a $13.6 million condo in Tribeca’s 56 Leonard, where he also designed a two-story public art piece reminiscent of his famed “Cloud Gate” in Chicago. [NYO]
  • Cobble Hill’s beloved independent bookstore BookCourt will close after 35 years, but local author Author Emma Straub hopes to replace it. [Gothamist]
  • “No Locks, Yes Lox” is the DOT’s latest attempt to stop love locks on the Brooklyn Bridge. [Untapped]
  • What does Trump’s pick of Ben Carson as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development mean for NYC? [WNYC]
  • New York museums are revamping their gift shops, teaming up with artists and designers and creating better online shops. [WSJ]

Images: Via Ivanka Trump/Instagram (L); 56 Leonard and Kapoor’s sculpture (R)

Art

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , December 6, 2016

The Astor Place Cube returned to its longtime East Village home just a month ago, after a nearly two-year absence while the intersection was under construction and it underwent a restoration. Sculptor Tony Rosenthal erected the 15-foot public art piece known officially as “Alamo” in 1967, and over the years he created around 10 mini replicas of it. One of them, measuring 21 inches and weighing 30 pounds, is up for sale on eBay for a staggering $30,000, which, as Bedford & Bowery points out, is not that much more than the $18,000 it cost to restore the actual cube.

Get more details

Featured Story

apartment living 101, Art, Features, More Top Stories

5 places to buy affordable modern art in New York City

By Lori Zimmer, Tue, December 6, 2016

  • By Lori Zimmer
  • , December 6, 2016

Our ongoing series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. This week Art Nerd New York founder Lori Zimmer shares her top five shops for scoring affordable art in trendy Manhattan.

Manhattan is a treasure trove of fine art. The gallery districts have shifted from Soho to Chelsea down to the Lower East Side, populating each neighborhood with clean white walls and a rotating collection of pieces from a roster of painters, sculptors, and mixed media artists. Although viewing the art the city has to offer is free, taking a piece home can be a major hit to the wallet. I’ve rounded up a list of great places in Manhattan to not only see art, but to also buy art affordably. Kickstart your burgeoning collection, or find a unique gift, at one of my picks below.

5 spots to score great art here

City Living, Policy

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , December 6, 2016

Like an unwanted visitor, well-intentioned but present well after becoming a daily nuisance, New York City’s familiar green sidewalk scaffolding seems to contradict the laws of gravity: It goes up but never really seems to come down. Now, the New York Times reports, a new City Council bill would require that scaffolding be taken down after six months–sooner if no work is being done.

Find out the details

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