MORE TOP STORIES

Cool Listings, Design, Interiors, Soho

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , August 18, 2017

Yes, that’s a magic carpet hanging from the ceiling of this SoHo co-op… or at least we’re pretty sure it is. This apartment, located at 11 Charlton Street, is actually full of quirks. Besides the ceiling decor, a sliding partition separates the living room from the bedroom transforming this from a studio to a one-bedroom apartment. Outside, a koi pond sits in the spacious, 700-square-foot private garden. This unit has been on and off the market for about a year now, asking as high as $1.795 million. Now it’s back on with a new listing price of $1.55 million.

Take a look

Bronx, Events

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 18, 2017

City Island Diner, courtesy of cisc1970 via photopin

A small town in the northeastern part of the Bronx, City Island sits about 1.5 miles long by half of a mile wide. While its quaint nautical-vibe seems out of place in New York City, City Island is very much a part of the Bronx’s history. Thanks to the City Island Chamber of Commerce, New Yorkers who want to learn about the island can ride the “land ferry,” or a decorated minibus, on the island for a free tour of the neighborhood’s artistic and musical sites, as amNY reported. The blue painted bus with wood paneling picks up riders, from April to December, at the end of the No. 6 train in Pelham Bay Park on the first Friday of every month.

Find out more

Featured Story

Features, History, More Top Stories, NYC Guides

How to kayak or canoe across a NYC water reservoir (GUIDE)

By Cait Etherington, Today, August 18, 2017

  • By Cait Etherington
  • , August 18, 2017

Image via Pexels

On average, New Yorkers use a staggering 1 billion gallons of water per day, but unlike people in many other U.S. cities, they don’t need to worry about their taps running dry. Over a century ago, city engineers devised a plan to ensure the city would have ample water and that the supply would meet the growing needs of the city over time. Today, the city’s century-old reservoir system continues to supply New Yorkers with clean water year round. For outdoorsy residents, the city’s water supply also serves another surprising purpose. Located just over two hours north of the city limits, the reservoirs are also an increasingly popular place to canoe and kayak without the distraction of motorized water vehicles and cottagers.

our complete guide here

Architecture, Design, hudson yards, Technology, Top Stories

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 18, 2017

The Shed courtesy of Diller Scofidio +Renfro, via The New York Times

Construction of The Shed, a six-level flexible structure that can adapt to different art forms and technologies, continues to progress. While the Hudson Yards building has an expected opening date of 2019, the massive 8-million-pound structure can now slide along the High Line for five minutes on a half-dozen exposed steel wheels that measure six-feet in diameter (h/t NY Times). The Shed, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, in collaboration with Rockwell Group, features a movable shell on rails that sits over the fixed base of the building, allowing for it to change size depending on the type of event.

See the Shed slide

Cool Listings, Hamptons

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , August 18, 2017

The 42+ acre Jule Pond Road Southampton estate that was built for Henry Ford II, grandson of the auto magnate, is asking $175 million; the towering ask makes the property, anchored by a 20,000-square-foot 12-bedroom home and blessed with the most ocean frontage in the Hamptons at almost a quarter mile long, the most expensive listing in not only the Hamptons but all of New York state, according to Mansion Global.

More photos of this gorgeous beachfront estate this way

Midtown, Policy, Transportation

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , August 18, 2017

Image via Wiki Commons

The day after Mayor de Blasio and Governor Cuomo announced plans to review and remove controversial public Confederate structures and markers throughout the city, the MTA says it will do the same. Well, sort of. Over 90 years ago, station architect Squire J. Vickers installed mosaics resembling the Confederate flag at the 40th Street entrance for the 1, 2, 3 trains to honor early New York Times owner and publisher Adolph S. Ochs, who had “strong ties to the Confederacy” and was buried with a Confederate flag when he died in 1935. But yesterday, MTA spokesperson Kevin Ortiz told Gothamist, “These are not confederate flags, it is a design based on geometric forms that represent the ‘Crossroads of the World’ and to avoid absolutely any confusion we will modify them to make that absolutely crystal clear.”

Read more

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, History

A 15-year-old Greenwich Village student inspired the hit song ‘Summer in the City’

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, August 17, 2017

  • By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation
  • , August 17, 2017

Image via Wiki Commons

Everyone knows the folk-rock classic “Summer in the City” by the Lovin’ Spoonful, which topped the charts 51 years ago this August in 1966. But fewer know the song’s roots in Greenwich Village–lead singer John Sebastian actually grew up in the neighborhood and the act got their start in the local clubs–and fewer still know a 15-year-old Village student was responsible for a significant part of its composition.

Get the whole story

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 17, 2017

Photo via NYC Parks

Applications are now being accepted for 43 newly constructed units at the Excelsior II, an affordable housing building in the Highbridge section of the Bronx. Designed by SLCE Architects, the building at 120-126 West 169th Street rises nine stories and features 60 units. New Yorkers earning 40, 50 and 60 percent of the area median income can apply for units ranging from $558 per month one-bedrooms to a $1,065 per month two-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

Major Developments, Midtown West, Top Stories, Transportation

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , August 17, 2017

Iage via the office of the Governor

At a press conference this morning in the under-construction space, Governor Cuomo announced that major work has begun on transforming the James A. Farley Building into the state-of-the-art, 225,000-square-foot Moynihan Train Hall. Along with the news that the $1.6 billion project will create 12,000+ construction jobs and 2,500 permanent jobs, come new renderings of the station, showing more exterior views and looks at the 700,000-square-foot shopping and dining concourse.

All the renderings and more details this way

Architecture, Construction Update, Landscape Architecture, Staten Island

  • By Diane Pham
  • , August 17, 2017

Image via NYC Parks and Recreation

The effort to turn Fresh Kills Landfill into a verdant and vibrant destination for wildlife and outdoor recreation received a huge boost on Monday (h/t DNA Info) as the city awarded a $22.9 million contract for the construction of the first major section of Freshkills Park. Up until now, the swath of Staten Island land—covering 2,200 acres of former dumping ground that has since undergone nearly two decades of remediation—has remained closed to the public, save for a few times a year when select areas are opened for “Discovery Days” that introduce visitors to the terrain and events that will eventually become mainstays of Freshkills when it is completed in 2036.

more details on what to expect

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