MORE TOP STORIES

lincoln square, real estate trends

Time Warner Center will be renamed for Deutsche Bank

By Devin Gannon, Mon, December 10, 2018

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , December 10, 2018

Via Joe Schulz on Flickr

Columbus Circle’s Time Warner Center will be renamed the Deutsche Bank Center, Commercial Observer reported on Monday. The name change comes as the Deutsche Bank inked a deal for 1.1 million square feet at the complex. The 25-year lease gives the German bank all available office space at the building except on its 20th floor.

More here

Art, Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Top Stories

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , December 10, 2018

Image by James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro, courtesy of the City of New York.

The Spur, the last section of the High Line, extending east along 30th Street and ending above 10th Avenue, is scheduled to open in 2019. Unlike other sections of the park which are more linear and perfect for strolling, this section will feature a large-scale plaza for public programming and art and areas for seating and gathering. Anchoring the new section will be the High Line Plinth. As Designboom reports, the Plinth will be one of the only sites in New York City with the purpose of featuring a rotating series of new contemporary public art commissions.

Renderings of the Plinth, this way

Brooklyn Heights, Cool Listings, Interiors

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , December 10, 2018

On a quiet block in the heart of Brooklyn Heights, this charming studio at 38 Livingston Street doesn’t offer a ton of square footage but the thoughtful design details make it worth a look. The fully-furnished unit is outfitted with chic, just-trendy-enough pieces that make a bold statement, and it’s asking the semi-reasonable rent of $2,450 a month.

See the whole petite place

Staten Island

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , December 10, 2018

The project to build the would-be world’s tallest Ferris wheel in Staten Island was called off in October, after nearly a decade of delays and $450 million in investment. While the proposed 630-foot New York Wheel is officially dead, parts of the ill-fated attraction will go up for auction next month, the New York Post reported. Items up for sale include the wheel’s legs, valued at $9.2 million, and drive towers, for $3.3 million.

Get your hands on the wheel

Construction Update, Design, Meatpacking District

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , December 10, 2018

Photo by CityRealty

Back in July 6sqft reported construction progress at the enthusiastically on-again Pier 55  public park project on the Hudson River funded by billionaire businessman Barry Diller. The park broke ground in April, and some snaps courtesy of CityRealty revealed new concrete pylons arranged in various heights that will act as the wave-shaped floating park’s support structure. Now, the New York Times details further and more fascinating progress on the $250 million park and performing arts venue, including the installation of its stylistic anchor in the form of a system of concrete supports called pots, the underpinnings of Diller’s unconventional architectural vision. And CityRealty once again reveals photos of what’s happening in the Hudson just west of the Meatpacking District.

Take a look at what’s rising from the Hudson

Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , December 10, 2018

Via Wikimedia

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority over the weekend doubled the speed limit on parts of two lines in Brooklyn, the N and R trains, from 15 miles per hour to as much as 30 miles per hour. These lines are the first of many the MTA will speed up, with transit officials planning to change the speed limits at 100 locations by the spring, the New York Times reported on Monday. The changes in speed limits are part of NYC Transit Chief Andy Byford’s $40 billion plan to modernize the problem-plagued subway system and improve service. “This is all about getting the safe maximum out of the existing signaling system,” Byford told the Times.

Get the details

Featured Story

Bronx, Features, History, More Top Stories

  • By Lucie Levine
  • , December 10, 2018

All photos included in this post were taken at Co-op City in the early 1970s and are courtesy of Co-op City

When Governor Rockefeller, Robert Moses, Jacob Potofsky of the United Housing Foundation, and Abraham Kazan, known as “the father of US cooperative housing,” broke ground on Co-op City in the Baychester section of the Bronx on May 14, 1966, they were doing something truly groundbreaking. In fact, Rockefeller called it a “completely sound investment in a better society.”

Co-op City is the world’s largest co-operative housing development. Built on 320 acres just north of Freedomland, the sprawling, self-contained development provides homes for over 15,000 families across 35 buildings, and supports its own schools, weekly newspaper, power plant, and planetarium. Originally built by the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America and the United Housing Foundation as cooperative, affordable, middle-income workers’ housing, Co-op city has remained dedicated to open membership, democratic control, distribution of surplus, and diversity for half a century.

Read more

Cool Listings, Getting Away, Upstate

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , December 10, 2018

Hudson, NY, is the place to head these days for a picture-perfect out-of-the-city weekend. Filled with fabulous restaurants, chic shops and darling dive bars, the Columbia County town’s mix of sophistication and small-town life hits just the right note. If you’ve dreamed of moving there and fixing up a quaint townhouse, you can live vicariously for a few nights–at $325 each, via Airbnb–at this charming carriage house. Featured on the Netflix renovation show, “Stay Here,” The Hudson River Carriage House is just a half block from the Warren Street main drag, but it’s so cute you may just want to stay in.

Have a look

Brooklyn, CityRealty, Manhattan, New Jersey, Queens, Rentals

  • By Annie Doge
  • , December 8, 2018

Images (L to R): Renting Downtown: Top 10 Rental Buildings in Financial District + Battery Park City

  • Renting Downtown: Top 10 Rental Buildings in Financial District + Battery Park City [LINK]
  • Cobalt Lofts in Harrison Launches Luxury Rentals from $1,915/Month; 20 Minutes from NYC [LINK]
  • Contemporary Rentals at Historic 71 Broadway: No-Fee Listings from $3,035/Month [LINK]
  • Bed-Stuy Rentals Launch at 1247 Atlantic Avenue with 1 Month Free; Net Prices from $1,825/Month [LINK]
  • New Midtown Luxury Rental Tower ARO at 242 West 53rd Street Leasing from $2,920/Month [LINK]
  • New Rentals Launch at ML House Across from Bryant Park; Priced from $3,225/Month [LINK]
  • Downtown Brooklyn’s The Amberly Leasing Luxury Rentals from $2,550/Month, See New Photos [LINK]
  • Live in South Brooklyn at The Hamilton; Contemporary Rentals from $1,950/Month [LINK]

SEE MORE RENTAL NEWS AND OFFERS HERE

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History, Union Square

From Mark Twain and the Lovin’ Spoonful to Tech Hub: The overlooked history of Union Square South

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Fri, December 7, 2018

  • By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation
  • , December 7, 2018

Photo of the former St. Denis Hotel courtesy of MCNY

Straddling Greenwich Village and the East Village, the neighborhood south of Union Square between Fifth and Third Avenues was once a center of groundbreaking commercial innovations, radical leftist politics, and the artistic avant-garde. With the city’s recent decision to allow an upzoning for a “Tech Hub” on the neighborhood’s doorstep on 14th Street, there are concerns that the resilient and architecturally intact neighborhood may face irreversible change. While they’re still here, take a tour of some of the many sites of remarkable cultural history, nestled in this compact neighborhood just south of one of our city’s busiest hubs.

See the full list

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