MORE TOP STORIES

Midtown, Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , January 22, 2021

Photo by Eden, Janine and Jim on Flickr

Nearly ten years and 30 proposals later, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey on Thursday unveiled a plan to replace the dilapidated Midtown bus terminal. The agency on Thursday presented its final scoping report for the project, which involves demolishing the existing bus station to make way for a larger, state-of-the-art terminal. According to the Port Authority, the new plan would increase the capacity for commuter and intercity buses at the world’s busiest bus terminal by nearly 40 percent.

More here

Featured Story

Features, Getting Away, NYC Guides, Places to Stay, Upstate

The 5 best ski slopes near New York City

By Cait Etherington, Thu, January 21, 2021

  • By Cait Etherington
  • , January 21, 2021

Photo of Hunter Mountain by Shinya Suzuki via Flickr cc

Sure, you’ll find more snow and more serious skiing if you fly to Colorado or even drive up to Vermont, but there are plenty of ski hills located in New York State, including several located within a one-and-a-half to three-hour drive of Manhattan. To be frank, the main thing these hills have on their side is their proximity to New York City. If you want to reenact a trip to the Alps or Aspen, you’re going to be disappointed, but if you want to plan an affordable day or overnight ski trip, skiing in the Catskills region can be a great option. Gov. Andrew Cuomo last fall gave ski resorts the go-ahead to reopen, seen as a safe outdoor activity during the coronavirus pandemic. However, there are COVID-19 restrictions at each resort, including mask mandates, social distancing and disinfection requirements, and 50 percent capacity limits indoors. Ahead, we break down five of the best ski resorts less than 150 miles from NYC, along with everything you can expect when hitting the slopes this year.

Get the guide here

Cool Listings, Hamptons

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , January 21, 2021

All photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

A stunning mansion on 15 acres overlooking the Long Island Sound is on the market for $14.6 million. Located at 2 Wallis Lane in the North Shore village of Nissequogue, the estate, known as Somerset, boasts a seven-bedroom main brick manor residence and nearly 900 feet of water frontage. The 1930s era home has preserved lots of its charm, from its curvy staircase to the intricate moldings.

Take the tour

East Village, Restaurants

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , January 21, 2021

Photo by City Foodsters on Flickr

Big Gay Ice Cream’s first brick-and-mortar location has permanently closed, as EV Grieve reported on Thursday. The East Village store at 125 East 7th Street opened its doors in 2011 after operating as an ice cream truck for two years. According to the neighborhood blog, the store has been closed since Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s coronavirus pandemic “pause” order in March and now a for-rent sign hangs in the window.

Find out more

Art, Astoria, City Living

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , January 21, 2021

Photo by Adrian Wilson / @plannedalism

Street artist Adrian Wilson decided to mark the momentousness of yesterday with a special NYC-themed tribute to our new President. At the 46th Street subway station in Astoria, he used stickers to change the “46th St” mosaic to read “46th Joe” with a change to the directional below to read “45th Out.” In his Instagram post, Wilson wrote, “Total cost including 4 train rides, $12. Anyone could have done it. But I had to do it. For Joe.”

Get the scoop

Cool Listings, lincoln square, Upper West Side 

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , January 21, 2021

Listing photos courtesy of The Corcoran Group

On the Upper West Side, on the corner of Broadway, this sunny alcove studio at 140 West 69th Street has both location and layout going for it. Listed for a palatable $550,000 the corner co-op has an entry foyer, sizable kitchen, separate sleeping area, and large windows. Plus, it’s a stone’s throw from Lincoln Center, Central and Riverside Parks, several major subway lines, and some of the neighborhood’s best restaurants and shops.

See more

Policy

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , January 20, 2021

Dr. Michelle Chester of Northwell Health in Queens prepares to administer the first coronavirus vaccine in New York State; Photo: Scott Heins for the Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo on Flickr

This past Friday, Mayor de Blasio began warning that New York City was likely to run out of COVID-19 vaccines in a week. And yesterday he confirmed these fears in his daily press briefing. “We will begin to run out on Thursday… And we will have literally nothing left to give as of Friday.” The city did not receive any additional doses, and therefore, has cancelled 23,000 appointments and closed its 15 vaccination hubs. This comes as the state has more than 9,000 people hospitalized from the virus, the highest number since May 4.

Read more

Greenwich Village, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Washington Heights

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , January 20, 2021

Street View of 70 Fifth Avenue, Map data © 2020 Google; Photo of W.E.B. DuBois in 1918 from Library of Congress, via Wikimedia Commons

A building in Greenwich Village that once served as the headquarters for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and housed W.E.B. DuBois’ trailblazing magazine The Crisis, could become a New York City landmark. The Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday voted to calendar 70 Fifth Avenue, a Neoclassical Beaux-Arts building designed by Charles A. Rich and built between 1912 and 1914. The commission also proposed the designation of two additional properties that “reflect New York City’s diverse history,” the Conference House Park Archaeological Site on Staten Island and the Holyrood Episcopal Church-Iglesia Santa Cruz in Washington Heights.

Find out more

Featured Story

Features, History

  • By 6sqft
  • , January 20, 2021

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

One of the nation’s most significant Inauguration Days has finally come, and while we’re all looking forward, we also thought it was pertinent to take a look back. On Thursday, April 30, 1789, the first United States Congress met, and the first president was sworn in (the presidential term had already started on March 4 of that year, but logistical delays had kept the votes from being counted or certified). With a quorum finally in place, George Washington took the oath of office as the first president of the United States, alongside Vice President John Adams, on the balcony of the Federal Hall in what is now the Financial District.

The whole history here

Featured Story

affordable housing, Features, Policy, real estate trends, Top Stories

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , January 20, 2021

Photo by Gage Skidmore on Flickr

After Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the United States on Wednesday, his immediate focus will be getting the coronavirus pandemic under control and providing direct relief to Americans. In addition to immediate actions related to COVID-19, Biden’s Day 1 housing priorities include extending the federal nationwide moratorium on residential evictions through the end of September and sending an additional $25 billion in rental assistance to states. Down the road, Biden has proposed fewer developer-friendly policies than his predecessor, including a repeal of the 1031 exchange and reform of the Opportunity Zone tax program. But overall, there is optimism among New York City real estate industry experts who see a Biden Administration as a way to restore stability and consumer confidence. With a pledge to defeat COVID-19 and send federal support to New York City, there’s hope on the horizon for the city’s recovery.

Learn more

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.