MORE TOP STORIES

weekend subway service

  • By Hannah Frishberg
  • , January 19, 2018

The MTA can’t even get its service change updates right: As of 4:50pm, The Weekender is showing duplicates for many track maintenance notifications, as if to repeatedly subject straphangers to service changes in writing. Easily the cherry on the cake of weekend transit hell, however, is that tomorrow, from 7am to 7pm, the L train will be running “approximately every 24 minutes between Broadway Junction and Rockaway Pkwy.” Oof, allow for some serious extra time. Many trains will also be running local.

The rest of it

Cool Listings, Interiors, Upper East Side

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , January 19, 2018

Summer feels far away… but this apartment’s lovely patio will at least bring back memories of New York’s warmer months. The very private, enclosed outdoor space is a part of this one-bedroom at the Lenox Hill cooperative 150 East 61st Street. After selling in 2010 for $400,000 it’s back on the market asking $599,000. The ground-floor abode boasts some unique design quirks like colorful wallpaper and decor, but a new buyer will have an opportunity to make the interior–as well as that awesome patio–their own.

Head inside

City Living, Policy

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , January 19, 2018

Federal Hall, photo courtesy of Wikimedia

If you’re an out-of-towner planning a classic, tourist-attraction-filled trip to New York City soon, you may want to rethink your visit. The U.S. government might be headed toward a shutdown, with its funding set to expire by midnight Friday. Although it’s not totally clear yet what will be affected in NYC, the last government shutdown in 2013, which lasted 16 days, temporarily closed national parks and a few federally-funded museums citywide. While there’s a chance the national parks and museums might choose to stay open, ahead find which ones might be affected in the event of a government shutdown.

More this way

Featured Story

City Living, Features, photography, Restaurants, The urban lens

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , January 19, 2018

Metro Diner on Broadway and 100th Street

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Riley Arthur documents NYC’s vanishing diners. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

“There’s no comparison to a New York diner experience,” says photographer Riley Arthur, which is what led her to start documenting all of the establishments throughout the five boroughs. Though she recently moved from Astoria to Florida, over the past two-and-a-half years she’s photographed roughly 215 diners (“I’ve lost count,” she says), usually hitting 10-12 a day and ordering a matzo ball soup at each! Since she began, at least a dozen diners have closed, usually due to rising rents, but Riley still has about 60 left to photograph. She shares her journey on the popular Instagram account Diners of NYC, where you’ll see everything from the faux-stone and shiny metal facades to the greasy bacon and eggs to the massive plastic menus to the neon signs and leather banquettes. Riley shared a set of her snapshots with 6sqft and filled us in on her process and favorite spots.

See Riley’s photos here

City Living

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , January 19, 2018

Photo via WNYC/Flickr

A new data analysis effort from the Washington Post titled “The top 10 places people are moving, and how their choices differ by race” offers some interesting insights into where people are ending up when they come from…elsewhere. Though it’s not the article’s intent, the first thing we notice is that New York City is number one in attracting sheer masses, huddled and otherwise. And the biggest comparable block of hopeful humanity is coming “from abroad.” The attraction factor gets more complex, though, when we adjust for size, looking at the percentage of the overall population the newcomers comprise. In that case, metro areas like Colorado Springs and San Jose move to the top. And what about race? Even more complicated.

Read on

Manhattan, Policy, Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , January 19, 2018

Photo courtesy of Davide Gabino’s Flickr

Drivers entering the busiest areas of Manhattan might soon be required to pay $11.52 per trip under a congestion pricing plan expected to be released by Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Friday.  According to the New York Times, the proposal comes from an advisory panel “Fix NYC,” a group assembled by the governor to explore ways to reduce congestion and also fund the city’s strapped-for-cash transit system. Under the proposal, trucks would pay $25.34 and taxis would see a surcharge of $2 to $5 per ride if entering the “pricing zone,” which would run south of 60th Street. Cuomo first introduced the idea of a congestion pricing plan to fund the MTA‘s transit repairs in August, after declaring the subway in a state of emergency earlier that summer.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Upper East Side

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , January 19, 2018

This 17-room co-op in the Rosario Candela-designed 778 Park Avenue is the kind of apartment you don’t see every day. The co-op’s owner is equally unique: Pantone creator Lawrence Herbert is asking $39.5 million for the six-bedroom spread occupying the entire 11th floor, with interiors by designer Peter Marino (h/t Curbed).

Explore this grand example of Park Avenue living

Uncategorized

Central Park West living room by Decor Aid, courtesy of CityRealty (L); Urban Space Vanderbilt via Shinya Suzuki/Flickr (R)

  • Sean Juneja, co-founder of interior design firm Décor Aid, talks about his inspirations and predictions for 2018. [CityRealty]
  • The East Harlem statue of unethical gynecologist Marion Sims will be moved from public Central Park to private Green-Wood Cemetery. [Brooklyn Paper]
  • Check out the five finalists selected for the 2018 City of Dream Pavilion on Governors Island. [Archinect]
  • This weekend will still be freezing–here are 20 cheap things to do to get you through. [Brokelyn]
  • Inside a tiny broom closet at an undisclosed East Williamsburg location is NYC’s tiniest bar; it holds just two guests and a bartender. [Untapped Cities]
  • The best things to eat at the city’s food halls this year. [NYO]
  • Frank Lloyd Wright’s final project, the Norman Lykes House in Phoenix, is for sale for $3.25M. [Inhabitat]

Manhattan, Policy, Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , January 18, 2018

Photo via Wikimedia

Crosstown protected bike lanes may finally come to Manhattan’s Midtown neighborhood, the first of its kind in New York City. The city’s Department of Transportation presented on Wednesday a series of proposals to create bike lanes that stretch from the East River to the Hudson River, traveling east to west instead of north to south. The first two protected lanes are proposed to run east on 26th Street and west on 29th Street, where an existing lane will be replaced. Officials are also looking to add a lane moving west on 55th Street and east on 52nd Street. DOT’s move to add more protected bike lanes in Midtown comes after the city experienced an increase in the number of cyclist deaths in 2017, despite it being the safest year on record for traffic fatalities.

Find out more

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , January 18, 2018

It’s been almost a year since the first lottery launched at Webster AvenueCOOKFOX‘s two-building affordable and supportive housing complex in the Tremont neighborhood of the Bronx. Four months after the lottery went live for the 227 units at Park House, nonprofit developer Breaking Ground reported that they’d received a staggering 55,163 applications. Now, they’ll need to get ready for another influx; as of today, the lottery is live for the second building, Webster Residence. Here, single New Yorkers earning 60 percent of the area median income, or between $25,000 and $40,000 annually, can apply for 80 $675/month energy efficient studios.

Find out more

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.