MORE TOP STORIES

Cool Listings, Flatiron, Interiors

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , July 20, 2018

This floor-through loft is indeed unique, as the listing claims. While the second-floor walk-up comes with over 1,000 square feet of interior space, it’s the wrap-around terrace and magical greenhouse that set this Flatiron co-op apart from so many others. 6sqft brought news of the 41 East 19th Street loft’s $5,000/month rental price back in February; now it’s for sale, asking $1.8 million. In addition to all of the interesting architectural details and loads of sunshine, the apartment comes with an alternate floor plan that shows you how to carve out a three-bedroom home and still have room to spare.

Have a look around

Long Island City, New Developments, Queens

Yet another tall tower is headed for Long Island City

By Michelle Cohen, Fri, July 20, 2018

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , July 20, 2018

42-50 24th Street rendering via Dynamic Star

Long Island City has been fertile ground for new skyscrapers for over a decade–and the biggest additions are still yet to come. Despite concerns over an apartment glut, developers are racing to send 60- and 70- story towers skyward, including the Durst Organization’s Queens Plaza Park, United Construction’s Court Square City View Tower, and Stawksi Partners’ 43-30 24th Street. A newcomer to this party is a mixed-use tower from Dynamic-Hakim and Property Markets Group (PMG) set to rise at 42-50 24th Street, CityRealty reports.

Find out more

Art, Events, Lower East Side

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , July 20, 2018

6sqft has been closely following the progress of photographers James and Karla Murray‘s Seward Park art installation “Mom-and-Pops of the LES,” featuring four nearly life-size images of Lower East Side business that have mostly disappeared. The pair, who have spent the last decade chronicling the place of small neighborhood businesses in 21st century New York City, was chosen for the public art project by Art in the Parks UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant Program and ran a wildly successful Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for the wood-frame structure’s build out. James and Karla will be having a free public exhibition of their photography for “Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York” at The Storefront Project (@thestorefrontproject) at 70 Orchard Street from July 25-August 12, 2018, with an opening reception on Wednesday, July 25th from 6-9 PM.

Find out more about this cool project

East Village, GVSHP, History

Development dispute over P.S. 64 in the East Village continues, two decades later

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Fri, July 20, 2018

  • By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation
  • , July 20, 2018

P.S. 64  in 2013, courtesy of GVSHP

Twenty years ago, on July 20, 1998, Mayor Rudy Giuliani sold former Public School 64 on the Lower East Side, then home to the Charas-El Bohio Community and Cultural Center, to a developer, despite opposition from the building’s occupants and the surrounding community. The decision and the building remain mired in controversy to this day. Community groups and elected officials will hold a rally in front of the building at 605 East 9th Street on Friday at 6 pm to mark the 20th anniversary of the sale and to call on Mayor Bill de Blasio to return the building to a community use.

More here

Art, History

  • By Lucie Levine
  • , July 20, 2018

Photo by Tia Richards for 6sqft

Coinciding with the 170th Anniversary of the Seneca Falls Women’s Rights Convention, members of the Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony Statue Fund unveiled on Thursday the official design of the first statue of non-fictional women in Central Park. Designed by Meredith Bergmann, the sculpture includes both legible text and a writing scroll that represents the arguments that both women — and their fellow suffragists — fought for. There is also a digital scroll, which will be available online, where visitors are encouraged to join the ongoing conversation. The sculpture of Stanton and Anthony will be dedicated in Central Park on August 18, 2020, marking the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, which granted women the right to vote nationwide.

Learn more about this monumental monument

affordable housing, Policy

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , July 20, 2018

Via Pixabay

New York City financed more than 32,000 affordable homes in the last fiscal year, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Thursday. This breaks the record set by former Mayor Ed Koch in 1989 and sets a record for most new construction with 9,140 affordable homes. But with the additional units come additional costs: The city’s investment in the housing plan grew from $1 billion in fiscal year 2017 to $1.6 billion this year.

Learn more

Harlem, Transportation, Upper East Side, yorkville

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , July 20, 2018

Photo via Flickr cc

According to new documents, the next leg of the extension of the Q line to 125th Street that comprises the second phase of the Second Avenue Subway will be done in 2029, the Daily News reports. And that completion date only holds if work is begun on time, in mid-2019, according to the same document from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the Federal Transit Administration. The expected phase two completion date is nearly a decade after Governor Andrew Cuomo opened the first section of the project in 2017. That 2029 date refers to the time all construction equipment has left the site; MTA officials hope to begin running trains through the tunnels, bringing vital service to Harlem, in 2027.

Find out more

Featured Story

Art, Features, More Top Stories, People

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , July 20, 2018

© Jim Bachor

Update 10:15am on 7/20/18: Jim Bachor tells us that the NYC Department of Transportation has already pulled up the cockroach, bouquet, Trump, and pigeon mosaics. 

If you recently saw a construction worker filling potholes around Manhattan and Brooklyn with mosaics and thought it was a bit off, you were right. This was Chicago-based artist Jim Bachor in disguise for his latest public art piece, “Vermin of New York.” For the past five years, Jim has been filling potholes in Chicago with mosaics of everything from flowers to trash, and after a successful Kickstarter campaign, he recently brought his work to NYC. The series includes a cockroach, a rat, a pigeon, and Donald Trump (yes, you can drive over his face). 6sqft was able to talk with Jim about how he got into such a unique form of “guerilla” art and what the meaning is behind his latest series.

Read on for more from Jim

More Top Stories, weekend subway service

  • By Hannah Frishberg
  • , July 20, 2018

Photo via Wikipedia

Monday will be a dark day for straphangers: At 5am, the 145th Street 3 station will close through November, the 23rd Street F, M station will close through December, and the Jamaica Center-bound 104th Street J, Z platform will close through January. This compounds the usual slew of service changes and the fact that the M is simply not running this weekend, and the E and F are having a masquerade as one another. In good news, by the MTA’s estimates the Avenue U, Avenue P, Avenue N, Bay Parkway and Avenue I Manhattan-bound platforms should be reopening this month.

Compared to the above, the other changes are more palatable

Art, Events

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , July 19, 2018

Photograph by Pablo Enriquez

6sqft previously reported on the arrival of “Narcissus Garden,” a site-specific installation made up of 1,500 mirrored stainless steel spheres by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama as MOMA PS1’s third installment of“Rockaway!,” a free biannual public art program dedicated to the ongoing recovery efforts after Hurricane Sandy. The completely mesmerizing installation is now on view from July 01-September 03, 2018 at Fort Tilden in the Gateway National Recreation Area, in a former train garage that once was an active U.S. military base. Kusama’s mirrored metal spheres reflect the industrial surroundings of the abandoned building and highlight Fort Tilden’s history. According to MoMA, the metal directs attention to the damage inflicted by Sandy in 2012 on the surrounding area.

More amazing images this way

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