MORE TOP STORIES

GVSHP, History

How a 15th century French migration gave us the term ‘Bohemian’

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, July 27, 2017

  • By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation
  • , July 27, 2017

Greenwich Village Bohemians outside Cafe Wha in the 1960s

“Bohemian” may be hard to define, but we all know it when we see it. But even in a city like New York, where bohemian can be used to describe everything from a polished West Village cafe to a South Bronx squat, few people know why exactly we today use this term, connected to a medieval Central European kingdom, to describe those with a countercultural bent.

The whole history right this way

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Upstate

  • By Annie Doge
  • , July 27, 2017

Although the marriage between Arthur Miller and Marilyn Monroe didn’t last long, the home where the two held their 1956 wedding certainly stood the test of time. The charming French Country-style home at 122 East Ridge Road in Waccabuc, New York has hit the market for $1.675 million (h/t LLYNC). Sitting on over four acres of land, the home features four bedrooms and five bathrooms. The sprawling pad features a pool and pool house, as well as scenic views of Lake Waccabuc. Last year, the Miller and Monroe’s former NYC pad just off Sutton Place at 444 East 57th Street, hit the market at an asking price of $6.75 million.

See inside

Cool Listings, Getting Away, Hamptons

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , July 27, 2017

Owning a “box of air on the land” at the Montauk Shores trailer park has become the ultimate status symbol for summering rich and famous, reports the New York Post. From “glorified changing room” after a day at the beach to compact escape chamber, denizens of the boho-chic beach town have snapped up so many modular mobile homes at the Montauk trailer park that it now has its own “Billionaires’ Corner.” The trailer park wasn’t always trendy; it began as a pop-up tent campsite in the 1940s and ’50s, eventually becoming a resort of sorts for police and firefighters, teachers and fishermen.

More history of this hip mobile hideaway

Architecture, Greenwich Village, New Developments, Union Square

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , July 27, 2017

An “oversized Silicon Alley” is what some are calling Mayor de Blasio’s plan to transform Union Square and its southern stretches into the city’s next tech hub. The main component so far is the massive Union Square Tech Hub proposed to replace the P.C. Richard & Son building on East 14th Street, but Councilwoman Rosie Mendez and the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation are advocating that, in exchange for the building, the city rezone the surrounding blocks to prevent an influx of out-of-scale development. Despite their oppositions, CetraRuddy has revealed on their site two environmentally friendly proposals for the site at 799 Broadway, the former home of the St. Denis Hotel at the southwest corner of East 11th Street. Spotted by CityRealty, the 240-foot, 17-story office building would be the first catering to the Mayor’s tech dreams, though the renderings are merely conceptual at this point.

All the renderings and details ahead

real estate trends

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , July 27, 2017

All Saints Church in Harlem, via NYC & Company

The Archdiocese of New York announced that 12 Catholic churches in Manhattan and The Bronx may be sold after declaring them no longer sacred sites for worship. As DNAinfo reported, the Catholic church released a list of properties, including some that had been shuttered since around 2015 when the church restructured many of its parishes by merging many together. After the diocese quietly posted the decrees over the July Fourth holiday weekend, many parishioners were angry that they had less time to appeal. Now some fear the churches will be converted luxury housing building, which has happened many times in the past few years due to the financial pressure on churches.

Find out more

Featured Story

Features, photography, sponsored content, The urban lens

  • By Diane Pham
  • , July 27, 2017

This post has been sponsored by 100 Barclay. To learn more about available condos or to schedule a tour, visit the official 100 Barclay website.

Much attention has been given to the landmarked 100 Barclay as of late thanks to a recent redevelopment of the upper floors into luxury apartments by Magnum Real Estate Group and the CIM Group. The full-block building, which sits on a site at the southern edge of Tribeca and just off the Hudson River waterfront, was originally constructed between 1923 and 1927 as the headquarters of the New York Telephone Company. Then known as the Barclay-Vesey Building (also the New York Telephone Building), the tower was the world’s first Art Deco skyscraper, designed by a young Ralph Walker while he was just an associate at McKenzie Voorhees & Gmelin. Walker’s design provided not only a launching pad for his own career (he soon after became a partner in his firm and later went on to become one of the country’s most esteemed architects) but the Barclay-Vesey would provide inspiration for many of New York’s future skyscrapers.

explore the murals here

Policy, Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , July 27, 2017

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority revealed on Tuesday an $800 million emergency rescue plan to fix the city’s failing subway system, which includes hiring 2,700 workers, removing some seats and adding additional train cars. And on Wednesday the MTA board grappled with ways to pay for the plan, with some members calling for the agency to end its routine fare and toll hikes and find revenue through other means. However, according to the New York Times, the authority’s chief financial officer, Robert Foran, said the agency needed to continue to raise fares by roughly 4 percent every other year as part of their long-term financial plan.

Find out more

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Gramercy Park

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , July 27, 2017

Musician/music producer Brian Burton (a.k.a. Danger Mouse) has just listed his cool maisonette-meets-loft duplex at 222 East 17th Street in Gramercy (h/t Luxury Listings). The six-time Grammy winner, “Grey Album” mashup artist, and Gnarls Barkley founder bought the pad in 2014 for $1.4 million. Likely a selling point was the garden co-op’s private church-adjacent garden that looks more fairy tale than hip hop.

Check out both levels

Architecture, Central Park South, condos, New Developments, Starchitecture, Top Stories

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , July 27, 2017

The construction of Property Markets Group and JDS Development’s 1,421-foot-tall tower at 111 West 57th Street has been the subject of much anticipation and excitement, as it’s slated to be among the tallest residential skyscrapers anywhere and the world’s most slender with a height-to-width ratio of 24:1. But after rising only 20 stories, the SHoP Architects-designed Billionaires’ Row addition has stalled, plagued with budget overruns and headed for foreclosure, the New York Post reports.

What could possibly have happened?

History, More Top Stories, Noho

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , July 26, 2017

After 34 years of serving giant Cajun-Creole portions alongside obscure jukebox music, Great Jones Cafe is closing its doors for good tonight. The notorious Noho bar at 54 Great Jones Street opened in 1983 when the block was so empty patrons used be able to play whiffle ball in the street, but its closure serves as a reminder of the history of Great Jones Street. This superlative name dates way back to 1789 when politician Samuel Jones donated land to the city under the terms that they name any street within the property after him. But there was one little issue….

Where did the street name come from?