MORE TOP STORIES

Cool Listings, Interiors, Park Slope

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , March 25, 2017

A renovation for this Park Slope co-op left it in lovely condition. The lofty floorplan–which boasts 18-foot ceilings–was taken full advantage of, getting customized floor-to-ceiling bookshelves with a library ladder. Huge windows bring in light, and the upper level of the apartment holds a large master bedroom and office space that looks down onto the living area below. The pad last sold in 2008, for $980,270, and now it’s on the market for $1.65 million.

Check it out

Weekly Highlights

Weekly highlights: Top picks from the 6sqft staff

By Dana Schulz, Sat, March 25, 2017

 

This Week’s Features

 

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Images: Anthony Triolo’s apartment by James and Karla Murray exclusively for 6sqft (L); 666 Fifth Avenue via KushnerC Companies/Zaha Hadid Architects (R)

Design, Furniture

  • By Rebecca Paul
  • , March 24, 2017

There are all types of stackable furniture out there, and while many of them function perfectly well, they’re not always the most design-friendly items in the room. Enter Stack. This new product line from the Providence-based design firm Debra Folz Design is a sleek, stylish and stackable addition to your home decor. The units are constructed as rectangular-shaped boxes that fit together through a series of grooves, each cut to accommodate metal rods.

Read more

Bronx, Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Interiors

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , March 24, 2017

The historic mansions of Riverdale never fail to impress, and this gem is no exception. Built in 1899 and known as the Esmeralda, the home has maintained many of its historic details over the years. Throughout formal dining and living areas, as well as all nine bedrooms, you’ll find finishes like hardwood flooring, oak doors, wood-beamed ceilings and fireplaces. The property also comes with an impressive degree of privacy, as you enter through a long, gated driveway. For this level of exclusivity and historic charm, the price tag is $4.129 million.

Take the grand tour

Daily Link Fix

 

Apartment Deals, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, Rentals

  • By Ondel Hylton
  • , March 24, 2017
  • Upper West Side Beaux Arts Beauty ‘The Willard’ Offering Two Months Free, 1-Bedrooms From $2,996/Month [link]
  • Live at LIC’s Hayden: These Majestic Skyline Views Could be Yours from $2,284/Month [link]
  • Grand Opening of 845 Grand Street in East Williamsburg, 1-Bedrooms From $2,675/Month [link]
  • Chelsea Leasing Special: $1,000 Security Deposits at 32-Story 777 Sixth Avenue [link]
  • 400 East 80th Street in Yorkville Leasing with $1,000 Security Deposits [link]
  • Leasing Launches for Phase One of Journal Squared; Live in 53-Story Tower for $1,855/Month [link]
  • Leasing Launches at Newly Constructed Astoria Rental, The Academy [link]
  • One Month Free at Newly Renovated Midwest Court Apartments on West 53rd Street [link]
  • Downtown Art Deco Tower 100 Maiden Lane Leasing with Up to Two Months Free [link]
  • Lenox Row Apartments on the Upper East Side Offer Up to Two Months Free for 2 and 3 Bedrooms Rentals [link]
  • Lofty Bushwick Rentals Offer One Month Free, 2-Bedrooms From $2,495/Month [link]
  • Downtown Brooklyn’s ‘Livingston Collection’ to Launch New Rentals in Borough’s First Public High School [link]
  • New Uptown Rental ‘Harlem 125’ Prepares for Spring 2017 Leasing [link]
  • Skyline Views from New Jersey’s Gold Coast: Landings at Port Imperial Leasing with Discounted Desposits, One Bedrooms from $2,325/Month [link]
  • Columbus Square Apartments on Upper West Side Offer One Month Free on Select Units [link]

SEE MORE RENTAL NEWS AND OFFERS HERE >>

Images (L to R): THE WILLARD, HAYDEN, 845 GRAND STREET and 777 SIXTH AVENUE

affordable housing, Policy

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , March 24, 2017

Outside of 432 Park Avenue, Mayor de Blasio held a press conference on Thursday to discuss his mansion tax. The proposal calls for a 2.5 percent surcharge on sales of city homes valued at $2 million or more, which would in turn fund affordable housing for 25,000 senior citizens. De Blasio fittingly positioned himself outside 432 Park because, according to the city, if the proposed tax had been passed, this residence alone would have generated $30.2 million since 2015 in support of housing for low-income seniors. “And that would have been based–and this is stunning to me–on the sale of just 62 condominiums. But it would have meant enough money to subsidize affordable housing for 2,000 seniors,” he said.

Find out more here

Midtown West, Policy, Sunset Park

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , March 24, 2017

At a Manhattan community board meeting Wednesday evening, city officials told garment industry representatives of plans to remove Midtown‘s manufacturing preservation requirement, Crain’s reports. The change to a 1987 zoning rule means that landlords will have the option to rent the formerly set-aside space to commercial office tenants. City officials cited the failure of the preservation effort to meet its goal, highlighted by a reported 83 percent decline the number of garment workers–from 30,000 to 5,100– since it was first implemented. As 6sqft recently reported, the rezoning is seen as “a clear push to drive these businesses toward lower cost space in Sunset Park.”

Find out more

Featured Story

Features, Greenwich Village, photography, Restaurants, The urban lens, Top Stories

  • By James and Karla Murray
  • , March 24, 2017

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, award-winning photographers James and Karla Murray return to give us a behind-the-scenes tour of Murray’s Cheese. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

Murray’s Cheese was founded in 1940 on Cornelia Street. When Rob Kaufelt bought the business in 1991, he grew the store into an internationally known food destination that now includes educational programs, a full-service restaurant, catering, and state-of-the-art cheese aging caves in Long Island City. Personally, our love affair with Murray’s Cheese began in 1994, when we were newlyweds on a budget, often buying cheese from the small Bleecker Street store to eat with some freshly baked bread purchased from the nearby Zito & Sons Bakery. Plus, with Murray’s being our namesake, we felt an immediate connection to the store.

Just last month, the Kroger Company purchased the equity of Murray’s Cheese and its flagship Greenwich Village location to form a merger of the two companies. As this new era approaches, we decided to capture all the cheesy goodness of the store, restaurant, and caves, as well as chat with Rob, cavemaster PJ, and Murray’s Cheese Bar’s general manager Jake Goznikar to learn about Murray’s history, unique contributions to local and world-wide food culture, and future.

Take the grand tour

affordable housing, Green Design, Top Stories, Urban Design

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , March 24, 2017

When Superstorm Sandy hit the community of Red Hook, thousands of residents were left without power and basic necessities for over two weeks. The neighborhood’s infrastructure suffered substantial damage, with almost all basement mechanical rooms destroyed. In an effort to rebuild Brooklyn’s largest housing development, Red Hook Houses, post-Sandy, the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) commissioned a project by architecture firm Kohn Pederson Fox (KPF). Their “Lily Pad” design includes installing 14 “utility pods” that deliver heat and electricity to each building, as well as creating raised earth mounds to act as a flood barrier (h/t Archpaper).

Find out more here

Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Policy, Urban Design

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , March 24, 2017

If you thought the roller coaster that is Pier 55 was over since construction began in November, you may not want to step off the ride just yet. Just yesterday, a federal judge ruled in favor of the City Club of New York, who took legal action against the $200 million Barry Diller-funded offshore park way back in the summer of 2015. As reported by the Times, Judge Lorna G. Schofield agreed with the group’s claim that the Army Corps of Engineers had not conducted a sufficient environmental review on how the 2.4-acre park would affect fish and wildlife. She ordered that work stop at the site and called for a review of alternatives for building along Hudson River Park, a maritime sanctuary.

Get the whole legal saga

From Our Partners

Amtrak will soon offer more weekend service options between Boston and New York, the railroad company announced Thursday. Those who take Amtrak’s Acela Express service will have more departure times to choose from on Saturday mornings and Sunday afternoons, beginning April 8. For Saturdays, the first Amtrak Acela train will leave Boston’s South Station at 6:10 a.m., reaching New York at 9:45 a.m., according to Amtrak spokesman Mike Tolbert.

MORE DETAILS AT METRO NY…

affordable housing, Brooklyn, housing lotteries

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , March 24, 2017

The Van Dyke Houses in Brownsville are a huge NYCHA compex, consisting of 24 buildings. Recently, a $56 million public/private investment went towards constructing the first new development here in decades, a 100-unit supportive and affordable housing building designed by Dattner Architects for a vacant parking lot on the site. Of these apartments, 45 will be leased to NYCHA tenants through a site-based waiting list, 30 to formerly homeless families, and 25 to those earning 60 percent of the area median income. This last group is now available through the city’s housing lottery for $876/month one-bedrooms and $1,058/month two-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify here

Cool Listings, Interiors, Williamsburg

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , March 24, 2017

With a subtle and stylish renovation, lots of irresistible textures like pale wood and whitewashed brick, and tons of sunlight, this two-bedroom co-op at 111 South Third Street in prime south Williamsburg is the kind of home you don’t see every day in this city. Its $665,000 ask, while not dirt cheap, is well below the average market price for two bedrooms in this neighborhood. Some caveats: The apartment is only 680 square feet (though there are indeed two bedrooms); it’s a walk-up though only on the third floor; and it’s an HDFC income-restricted co-op, which is why the price is lower than average. But none of those things make this lovely little apartment seem any less like a charming, chic flat right out of Amsterdam.

Have a look

Historic Homes, Starchitecture, Top Stories, Turtle Bay

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , March 23, 2017

Screen cap via NYT

Just down the street from the now-closed modernist treasure trove and icon that was the Four Seasons in Manhattan’s east 50s is a lesser-known architectural treasure. Philip Johnson’s 1950 Rockefeller Guest House is one of a handful of private residences the architect designed for New York City clients. The house is a designated historic and architectural landmark, but a subtle one that’s easily missed on the quiet street–as the New York Times puts it, “the house doesn’t give up its secrets easily.” Once you spot the home’s brick-and-glass facade, though, it’s hard not to be enthralled.

Find out more and take a video tour

Green Design, Policy

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , March 23, 2017

While you may have never heard of the term “bioswale,” you have probably seen these curbside gardens throughout the city. A bioswale, or rain garden, is a pit dug into the sidewalk that’s been filled with rocky soil and shrubbery. These gardens absorb polluted stormwater and prevent runoff that could seep into waterways through the sewer system. Despite being an effective solution to water pollution, the New York Times reports that some city residents are crying out against find bioswales, calling them unattractive, messy, and hotbeds for trash and pests.

Find out more here

Celebrities, Central Park South, Cool Listings

  • By Annie Doge
  • , March 23, 2017

Sure, a piano is always a nice touch, especially in a classic Central Park South condo like this. But when that piano belonged to none other than the late David Bowie, that certainly changes things. First spotted by the Post, the Essex House apartment that he and wife Iman lived in from 1992 to 2002 (before moving to Soho, where she still lives) has hit the market for $6,495,000, which includes Bowie’s Yamaha.

See the rest

Daily Link Fix

  • 17th century Barberini tapestries now on view at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. [Untapped]
  • Baseball commentator and former Yankees and Mets pitcher David Cone has listed his Greenwich Lane pad for $10.5 million, which he bought just a year ago for $8 million. [NYP]
  • Elevators are rising to the challenge of supertall towers with lighter components, motion monitors and other technological advances. [WSJ]
  • Shake Shack is now testing delivery through Caviar. [Eater]
  • What if we hung skyscrapers from orbiting asteroids? [Dezeen]

 

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Midtown East

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , March 23, 2017

Earlier this month, 6sqft revealed renderings of 601 Lexington Avenue‘s (the Midtown East skyscraper formerly known as the Citicorp Center) new “Market Building,” comprised of an interior atrium to hold dining/retail space and a new outdoor plaza and terraces. Though the LPC landmarked the building this past December, the Architect’s Newspaper has learned of a loophole in the designation regarding the privately owned public space, which could mean that amid the renovation, the sunken plaza and cascading fountain designed by Hideo Sasaki‘s firm–one of the iconic landscape architect’s few remaining works–may be demolished.

The full story ahead

Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

  • By Lori Zimmer
  • , March 23, 2017

In a city where hundreds of interesting events occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top picks for 6sqft readers!

See the newest of American art according to curators Christopher Y. Lew and Mia Locks at the Whitney Biennial, then check the original intent of Solomon R. Guggenheim’s collection at the museum bearing his name. Put your arty dancing shoes on for a party at the Knockdown Center, then celebrate fashion at the House of Yes. Get an insider’s look at Daniel Gustina’s designs for Old Hollywood at FIT, and check out Ventiko’s sanctuary at Chinatown Soup. Finally, spend an evening with funny artists at Muchmore, or indulge in your favorite French things at a screening of Coppola’s Marie Antoinette.

More on all the best events this way

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