MORE TOP STORIES

navy yard, Policy, Top Stories, Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 25, 2017

Although Mayor de Blasio’s proposed BQX project, which would connect the Brooklyn and Queens waterfronts via streetcar, received praise from many, finding money to fund it may be tougher than expected. Earlier this month, a leaked memo obtained by the Daily News laid out a tough assessment of the construction logistics and financial problems facing the project. And while the mayor admitted last week that his plan for the BQX to be self-funded through tax revenue from higher real estate values may not pan out, an article in Crain’s laid out an idea for the city to sell air rights in the Brooklyn Navy Yard neighborhood to raise money for the project.

Find out more

Design, Green Design

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , April 25, 2017

Renderings by PlayLab, courtesy of +POOL.

Seven years ago the team behind +POOL floated the fanciful–but completely fun–sounding idea of building a pool submerged in NYC’s East River that would filter the polluted waterway in addition to being a cool-off spot for New Yorkers. Curbed reports that though the official line is that all options are still being looked at, project designers hope the city will allow +POOL to be located off a pier at Brooklyn Bridge Park.

More the floating pool’s progress and new renderings this way

Featured Story

Features, Interiors, More Top Stories, MY SQFT HOUSE TOURS, Upper East Side

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , April 25, 2017

6sqft’s ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to the Upper East Side studio of real estate broker Michael Miarecki. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

When Michael Miarecki moved from a huge house in Miami Beach to a 360-square-foot studio on the Upper East Side he knew he needed to get creative. As a busy real estate agent with Sotheby’s International, he says his space “is a good example of taking a small space and creating a big story in it.” By combining a beachy vibe of neutral tones, light fabrics, and comfortable furniture with clever small-space fixes like his custom-built bed platform, hidden shelving, and a carefully curated selection of mementos, he’s created a calming oasis that feels twice its size. He’s even worked out how to host eight guests over for a movie, six for a dinner party, and four to sleep. 6sqft recently paid Michael a visit to see how he does it and what a typical day uptown is like for him.

Take the tour

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 25, 2017

Located just a few blocks from Yankee Stadium, this affordable housing project with a beautiful shared courtyard is truly unique, as it was developed on one of the last vacant city-owned lots. Applications are now being accepted for one- and two-bedroom rentals at 12 East Clarke Place and 27 East 169 Street in the Highbridge section of the Bronx, including $963/month one-bedrooms and $1,166/month two-bedrooms. 

Find out if you qualify

Top Stories, Transportation

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , April 25, 2017

The long-anticipated–and long-delayed–batch of about 70 shiny new subway cars will roll into stations before the end of the year according to the MTA as reported by AM New York. The new cars will replace the system’s oldest–and most breakdown-prone–cars on the J, Z and C lines. Another 230 more are scheduled to hit the MTA rails over the course of 2018. Steve Plochochi, the MTA’s vice president of procurement and material, called the cars’ arrival “long-awaited good news,” and outlined MTA plans for a “major design change” in subway cars for future models.

What about those future models

Cool Listings, Upper West Side 

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , April 25, 2017

Back when Billionaires’ Row was little more than Central Park South, the newly-converted historic Apthorp condominium building at 390 West End Avenue in the heart of the Upper West Side was said to be one of the city’s most expensive apartment buildings. Built for William Waldorf Astor in 1908, the building surrounds an interior courtyard, setting it apart from Manhattan’s many other regal residences. Converted to condominiums after being sold in 2006, the building’s most luxurious units arrived on the market in 2013, and new Manhattan sales records were set. The Apthorp may enjoy a moment in the headlines again: Its most expensive unit just hit the market asking $23.995 million. That number–or anything near it–will set a new record for residential units in the building. The larger of the two units in this combined sale is also the building’s largest renovated home, spanning a jaw-dropping 8,000 square feet.

Take a tour of this unparalleled residence

History, Lower East Side, maps

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 24, 2017

While today’s Lower East Side has no shortage of bars and clubs, New Yorkers of the late nineteenth century may have imbibed way more than current Big Apple dwellers. Slate shared this map drawn in 1885 and published in the Christian Union that details the number of bars per block in the neighborhood. Although the coinciding article described the social effects of LES drinking culture, overall the report found residents to be quite happy. It may have had something to do with the 346 saloons found in the area, compared to today’s mere 47 establishmentsFind out more

Design, Products

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , April 24, 2017

Spring has us thinking about greenery, with roots and shoots popping everywhere we turn–but most city dwellers don’t have a garden to grow. Enter the smart planter from LeGrow. These snappy planters fit together like LEGO blocks for plants, making our design sensibilities happy by adding a cool modular element while allowing us to add living greenery to our indoor surroundings.

Find out more

Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 24, 2017

With the launch of the much-anticipated NYC Ferry quickly approaching, crews responsible for manning the boats continue to train in preparation. As amNY shares in a new video, before captains can operate the ferries, they must first master a digital simulation at SUNY Maritime in the Bronx. In a small room shaped like a ferry wheelhouse with wraparound screens that provide a 360-degree view of the New York Harbor, captains in training must steer past digital boat traffic and landmarks like the Statue of Liberty. Overseen by staff members from Hornblower Cruises, the simulator tests an applicant’s decision-making skills, navigational abilities, and understanding of Coast Guard Regulations.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Interiors, Red Hook

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , April 24, 2017

This three-family brick townhouse comes from Brooklyn’s waterfront neighborhood of Red Hook. The area is known for its striking views of the Lower Manhattan skyline, and the listing promises those same views from the top floor of this home, located at 371 Van Brunt Street. Add in tin ceilings and fireplaces throughout the lower levels, and the historic property, now on the market for $2.5M, is sure to charm.

Time to check it out

Featured Story

apartment living 101, City Living, Features

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , April 24, 2017

6sqft’s ongoing series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. This week, we’ve put together a list of tips for hiring movers and making sure the big day runs smoothly.

With universities about to let out and warmer weather leading us out of hibernation, moving season in NYC is upon us. And if you’re not one of the brave souls who plans to enlist family and friends to help with the dreaded schlep, you don’t want to blindly hire the first man with a van you come across. From big corporations to small family-run operations, movers in NYC run the gamut in terms of services, pricing, and proximity, but regardless of which route you take, there are several things to consider before deciding. Ahead, 6sqft has rounded up 12 tips for hiring movers, including performing background checks, making sure you’ve accurately counted your boxes (no one wants to be that person), and negotiating the estimate.

All the tips ahead

affordable housing, housing lotteries, More Top Stories, West Village 

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 24, 2017

Photo via Field Condition

Beginning today, qualifying New Yorkers can apply to buy seven affordable condominiums at 100 Barrow Street in the West Village. The luxury residential building, developed by Toll Brothers City Living and designed by Barry Rice Architects, has 26 units total and sits at the corner of Barrow and Greenwich Streets. Market-rate apartments start at $4 million, but those available through the lottery range from a $90,000 studio to $170,000 two-bedrooms for individuals earning no more than 125 percent of the area median income.

Find out if you qualify

Cool Listings, West Village 

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , April 24, 2017

On the kind of West Village street that makes you curse Google for taking the photos on such a sunny day, this quintessential historic brick townhouse is surrounded by others like it on a block we can’t see ever wanting to leave. The one-bedroom rental apartment on the second floor of 191 West 10th Street has the usual charms of a Village aerie: exposed brick, high ceilings, big windows–but the unexpected win is that rare and coveted city haven, private outdoor space in the form of a large and lovely terrace (which likely helps to sell the prospect of $5,050 a month rent.)

Get a closer look

Cool Listings, Gramercy Park

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , April 23, 2017

This two-floor two-bedroom garden apartment in an elegant Gramercy townhouse at 134 East 16th Street makes great use of subterranean space for more than just laundry, adding a cedar wine cellar, screening room and more for $3.15 million. The main garden floor is even more impressive with a gorgeous hinged glass wall that opens onto 1,000 square feet of pretty city garden.

See more of this amazing maisonette

Cool Listings, Getting Away, Places to Stay, Upstate

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , April 22, 2017

ESCAPE Homes, who build “travel-ready” tiny RVs, have put their latest offering in the Hudson Valley up on Airbnb for $145/night. Known as “The Glass House,” the super-compact, 180-square-foot getaway shares the rectangular footprint and oversized windows of Philip Johnson’s masterpiece, but other than that, this rental is one-of-a-kind. Solar powered and off-grid, it sits on 30 acres of rolling hills just 90 minutes from Manhattan and can fit a queen-size bed, fully functional kitchen, dining area, and full bath with a tub/shower in its itsy footprint.

Read more

Weekly Highlights

Weekly highlights: Top picks from the 6sqft staff

By Dana Schulz, Sat, April 22, 2017

 

This Week’s Features

 

Follow 6sqft on Twitter and like us on Facebook. You can also get the top stories mailed to you—sign up here.

Images: Lester Holt’s apartment at 225 Fifth Avenue via TOWN (L); “Mr. Perkins Pierce Arrow” 1946 copyright the Todd Webb Archive (R)

 

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, New Jersey, Top Stories

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 21, 2017

One of the most expensive residential listings in New Jersey recently hit the market at an asking price of $48 million. The 100-year-old, nearly 50,000-square-foot mansion sits on 12.5 acres in Mahwah with views of the Ramapo Mountains (h/t Wall Street Journal). The enormous house, originally built in 1907 by George Crocker, son of railroad tycoon Charles Crocker, was modeled after a Jacobean-style English castle and today boasts a 45-foot-tall organ, 29 bathrooms, 21 bedrooms, and two full kitchens, one equipped to serve an impressive 250 meals at a time.

See photos of the incredible mansion

Brooklyn, History

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , April 21, 2017

A row of Quonset huts in Canarsie, via Brooklyn Public Library

When veterans returned to NYC from WWII, they were met with a Depression-era housing shortage that resulted from a nearly 15-year lack of new development. To immediately address the issue, “master builder” Robert Moses (who by this time was reigning over the city’s public housing projects) proposed erecting Quonset huts on vacant land in Brooklyn and Queens. These curved, corrugated steel “shacks” were used in the Pacific as barracks and offices, as they were lightweight and quick and easy to assemble. As the Brownstone Detectives tell us, after much debate, the city agreed to use more than 500 Federal surplus huts as temporary public housing on land along the Belt Parkway in the South Brooklyn neighborhoods of Canarsie and Jamaica Bay, as well as in Jackson Heights, Middle Village, and Corona in Queens.

Get the whole history

Brooklyn, CityRealty, Manhattan, New Jersey, Queens, Rentals

  • By Ondel Hylton
  • , April 21, 2017

Images (L to R): 153 Remsen Street, Hubb, Trump Bay Street and Orient Park

  • The Lincoln Apartments at Prospect Park Debut with 2 Months Free; Units Start from $2,186/Month [link]
  • Trump Bay Street, Luxury Rentals in Jersey City, Now Leasing with 2 Months Free [link]
  • Lower East Side Rental ‘Rivington House’ Offering 1 Month Free on Renovated Apartments [link]
  • $500 Security Deposits at 180 Montague Street in Brooklyn Heights [link]
  • Grand Opening of Brooklyn Heights’ 153 Remsen Street, Family Sized Rentals Launch with 1 Month Free [link]
  • Downtown Brooklyn’s Soaring New Rental 33 Bond Street Launches Leasing for Summer Grand Opening [link]
  • Jersey City’s ‘Ellipse’ Launches Leasing – New Waterfront Rentals Are All About the Views [link]
  • Orient Park Apartments in East Williamsburg Leasing with 1 Month Free; 1 Bedrooms from $2,644/Month [link]
  • Long Island Waterfront High-Rise Offers Discounted Security Deposits [link]
  • Brooklyn’s Newly-Minted Tallest is a Slice of “Urburbia” with Views for Days [link]

 

SEE MORE RENTAL NEWS AND OFFERS HERE >>

Cool Listings, Gowanus, Park Slope

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , April 21, 2017

At a mere 15 feet wide and two stories high, this compact townhouse at 629 President Street is priced to compete with–and beat–many a smaller condo at $1.825 million. Hiding in plain sight on a street of similarly cute and compact brick townhomes at the spot where Park Slope meets Gowanus (making it also home to just about every amazing amenity in Brooklyn) this otherwise nondescript 1900s home becomes a surprise of a sweet, spacious and bright farmhouse once you step inside. It’s a pretty neat trick.

Have a look

Major Developments, Midtown West, Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 21, 2017

This spring, the 650,000 commuters who travel through Penn Station daily may finally start to witness Governor Cuomo’s $1.6 billion plan to revamp what he called the “overcrowded, decrepit and claustrophobic” station into a more spacious and high-tech transit hub. As the Daily News reports, the first phase of the overall Moynihan Station Development Project will begin soon, extending Penn Station’s West End Concourse to reduce congestion. The second phase will transform the James A. Farley Post Office into the new Moynihan Train Hall, which will hold more than 112,000 square feet of retail and 588,000 square feet of office space, in addition to new ticketing and waiting areas for Amtrak and Long Island Railroad passengers.

More details right this way

Uncategorized

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , April 21, 2017

After Donald Trump put in place his strict and controversial travel restrictions, foreign travelers unsurprisingly became wary or coming to the U.S., notably student and youth groups and those from Mexico. In New York City, international visitors make up just 20 percent of tourists, but they account for more than 50 percent of spending, dropping an average of $2,000 each during their stays, which also include more stays in the outer boroughs. However, NYC & Company, the city’s tourism agency, expects the number of foreign tourists to drop by 300,000 fewer than 2016, when 12.7 million international visitors came to NYC, the first drop in seven years. According to the Daily News, this will result in $120 million less in tax revenue for the city and state and $600 million less spending in the city.

More details ahead

Featured Story

Features, History, The urban lens

  • By Diane Pham
  • , April 21, 2017

“I instantly fell in love with Webb’s work,” says former LIFE editor-in-chief Bill Shapiro, “with the beauty he captures, with his sense of the life of the street; with the way he frames both the sweeping, iconic skyline and those small, fleeting moments that define the city that New Yorkers love.”

These sentiments seem to be shared by just about everyone who encounters the work of Todd Webb for the first time. Webb, most fittingly described by Shapiro as “the best NYC photographer you’ve never heard of,” worked and laughed alongside photography’s upper echelon, including Georgia O’Keeffe, Walker Evan, Gordon Parks and Ansel Adams, but unlike his well-known friends, Webb was never interested fame. Instead, he quietly took to documenting life in America, particularly post-war New York between 1946 and 1960.

more on the work of todd webb here

New Jersey, Staten Island, Transportation, Urban Design

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 21, 2017

While the city continues to develop ways to quicken commutes between Manhattan and the outer boroughs (like the soon-to-be-launched NYC Ferry), the Staten Island Economic Development Corporation (SIEDC) has taken matters into their own hands and created an idea for an aerial gondola. Similar to the East River Skyway proposal, which would transport passengers across the East River to ease the inconvenience of the impending L train shutdown, the gondola would take commuters in the sky from the borough to Bayonne, NJ where they’d connect to the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail and ultimately the PATH. As WYNC learned, starting this week and for seven days only, the gondola will be touring Staten Island on the back of a flatbed truck to boost support from officials to fund the project.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Interiors, yorkville

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , April 21, 2017

Yorkville has long been considered one of Manhattan’s more affordable uptown neighborhoods–although that’s been changing in recent years–but here’s a neighborhood pad that’s not priced too high. For $695,000 you’ll get a one-bedroom duplex within the historic brownstone at 421 East 84th Street. The upper floor boasts two large windows and a wood burning fireplace, while the lower level has enough space to fit a king-sized bed and other furniture. Plus, it’s located just a few blocks away from the new Second Avenue subway station at 86th Street.

More photos this way

Celebrities, Recent Sales, Upper West Side 

  • By Annie Doge
  • , April 20, 2017

It’s been exactly two years since Demi Moore first listed her incredible San Remo penthouse for $75 million. But after sitting idly on the market for 14 months, she reduced the price way down to $59 million, and The Real Deal now got wind that she’s finally sold the 17-room triplex for an even more reduced $45 million. Despite the major price chop, this is still the biggest sale ever at the iconic Central Park West co-op.

Read more

Architecture, Major Developments, Midtown East

  • By Diane Pham
  • , April 20, 2017

One of the city’s most pivotal new office towers is approaching its latest milestone. This afternoon, developer SL Green announced that One Vanderbilt, the supertall currently under construction directly adjacent to Grand Central Terminal, will begin its vertical ascent in early May. According to a press release, the 1,401-foot skyscraper’s construction manager, AECOM Tishman, has secured the procurement of more than 25,000 tons of domestically-fabricated structural steel, in addition to a New Building Permit from the New York City Department of Buildings.

more details here

Landscape Architecture, More Top Stories, New Developments, Williamsburg

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , April 20, 2017

With building construction well under way at the Domino Sugar Factory site, Two Trees Management has now released details about the 11-acre park that will anchor the three-million-square-foot Williamsburg mega-development. To be known as Domino Park and designed by James Corner Field Operations, the quarter-mile open space will boast a new waterfront esplanade, six acres of parkland, a plethora of preserved artifacts, and easier waterfront access. In addition to sharing several new renderings, Two Trees also announced that the park will open in the summer of 2018.

All the details and renderings ahead

affordable housing, Brooklyn, Policy

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 20, 2017

In every state and major city in the country, extremely low-income renters face a shortage of affordable housing. Although low-income applicants in New York City display a higher need for affordable housing, policies created by Mayor de Blasio and his administration continue to set aside more units for middle-income applicants. In a detailed report, City Limits analyzed affordable housing in Brooklyn and compared the need for affordable housing to the actual number of allotted low-income and middle-income units. For just one building, the tower at 535 Carlton, nearly 95,000 households entered the lottery for its “100 percent affordable” units. However, only 2,203 applicants were eligible for the 148 middle-income units, and over 67,000 households applied for the 90 low-income units. The data shows low-income households in search of affordable housing face much tougher odds than middle-income applicants.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Financial District, Interiors

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , April 20, 2017

This FiDi duplex was designed to impress. Location within a historic brick townhouse at 150 Beekman Street, the interior of the apartment has been completely modernized. You might say the apartment offers the best of both worlds: cobblestone streets and a historic facade, as well as a modern, open layout with luxury finishes throughout the interior. For five bedrooms, four bathrooms and 3,232 square feet, it is now asking $5.795 million.

Take a deeper look

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