MORE TOP STORIES

Events, Financial District, History, Restaurants

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 18, 2018

A ladies luncheon at Delmonico’s in 1902; photo via MCNY

Nearly five decades before women were granted the right to vote in New York State, a group of fed-up ladies decided to protest a symbolic law that prohibited them from dining in restaurants without men present. After journalist Jane Cunningham Croly was barred from entering a dinner held at the New York Press Club, she and a group of women founded Sorosis, the first professional women’s club in the United States. On April 20, 1868, Croly and her crew held a luncheon at the historic Delmonico’s Restaurant in the Financial District, which became the first to serve women independently of men. Following the groundbreaking meal, clubs for only women formed all over the country.

The full history ahead

Connecticut, New Jersey, Policy, Transportation, Upstate

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , April 18, 2018

A map showing T-REX’s new crosstown connections, via RPA

When NYC’s three commuter railroads–the Long Island Railroad, New Jersey Transit, and Metro-North–were built more than a century ago when the metropolitan area was less than half its current size. Today, the systems are crumbling, both in their physical infrastructure and politics. The latest suggestion for how to fix the issues comes from a new Regional Plan Association report that wants to take advantage of the fact that these railroads “share an amalgamation of rail lines” and thereby create one integrated regional rail network. Dubbed T-REX, short for Trans-Regional Express, the 30-year, $71.4 billion proposal would add 60 new train stations and more than 200 miles of new tracks.

We break it down

Bed Stuy, Cool Listings, Interiors

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , April 18, 2018

We’re sensing a tiny-townhouse-as-condo-alternative trend here; and why not? Low taxes, backyard space, and basement storage are hard to pass up. This particular version is a stylishly renovated three-bedroom home at 264 Bainbridge Street in pretty Stuyvesant Heights, with an even tinier–but no less adorable–backyard shed in the covetable backyard. It’s asking a diminutive-seeming $950,000.

Take a look around

Featured Story

Boerum Hill, Features, Interiors, My SQFT House Tours, Top Stories

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , April 18, 2018

6sqft’s series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to the Boerum Hill home of Ample Hills founders Jackie and Brian. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

If you’ve ever indulged in an Ample Hills ice cream cone, you know that their fanciful flavors (Ooey Gooey Butter Cake, the Munchies, and Snap Mallow Pop, just to name a few!) are perfectly matched by the Brooklyn company’s whimsical shops. But founders Jackie Cuscuna and Brian Smith definitely didn’t grow in seven years from their first storefront in Prospect Heights to nine locations, including one in Disney World, and a forthcoming Red Hook factory where they’ll produce 1 million gallons a year, without a lot of hard work and business smarts.

And it’s this combination of playfulness and attention to detail that they’ve carried over to their adorable Boerum Hill home, which they moved into two years ago with their eight-year-old son and 11-year-old daughter. A triplex in a quintessential Brooklyn brownstone, their home has cheery pops of color, mid-century-modern furnishings, and an eclectic mix of decor and family mementos. 6sqft recently visited the couple to tour their space, hear why they love Brooklyn, and learn about Ample Hills’ plans.

Tour this sweet home and hear from Brian and Jackie

Events, Lower East Side, Urban Design

  • By Michelle Colman
  • , April 18, 2018

Squash is often considered the sport of prep schools and Ivy League colleges, but four squash enthusiasts are changing that, one court at a time. The NYC Parks Commissioner Mitchell J. Silver officially opened the first-of-its-kind in the world outdoor squash court at Hamilton Fish Park on the Lower East Side. This amazingly cool court looks more like an Apple Store glass cube than a fitness facility. Even cooler, it’s funded by the nonprofit Public Squash and is free to the public and will offer free clinics throughout the summer.

Get all the details!

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Williamsburg

Live in the heart of hip Williamsburg, from $865/month

By Devin Gannon, Wed, April 18, 2018

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 18, 2018

Via Dattner Architects

Although rental prices are dropping in Williamsburg due to the impending L-train shutdown, a recently launched lottery is offering up a can’t-miss deal. A brand new building located at 105 South Fifth Street has 38 affordable units up for grabs. In addition to the housing units, the Datter Architects-designed mixed-use project features roughly 4,000 square feet of retail and a 1,000-square-foot medical facility. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 60 percent of the area median income can apply for apartments ranging from an $865/month studio to a $1,121/month two-bedroom.

Find out if you qualify

City Living, maps, Policy

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , April 18, 2018

It’s time to think about gardening–a seasonal rite that’s something of a challenge for most city-dwellers. Living Lots NYC is a clearinghouse of information that New Yorkers can use to turn vacant land into community spaces. Begun as a pilot project that ran from 2011 to 2015, which led to the to the official transformation of 32 vacant lots, Living Lots NYC was created by community organization 596 Acres as a database that New Yorkers can use to find, unlock, and protect the shared resource of the city’s vacant lots. According to the map, at this particular moment, there are 877 sites throughout 626 acres of vacant public land, 18 sites on 8 acres of private land opportunities, and 559 sites on 211 acres to which people have access.

Check out the city’s green opportunities

Daily Link Fix

Photo via The Gutter (L); Trump Tower via Krystal T’s Flickr (R)

  • Vintage-themed bowling alley the Gutter, which has locations in Williamsburg and LIC, will open at Essex Crossing. This outpost will have a mid-century-modern aesthetic. [The Lo-Down]
  • The fatal fire earlier this month at Trump Tower was caused by too many electronic devices hooked into power strips. [NYDN]
  • NYC has not opened an entirely new subway line since 1940. Here’s why. [City Lab]
  • The City Council wants to add $2M to a task force targeting illegal Airbnbs. [Crain’s]
  • An event at Federal Hall will recreate George Washington’s 1789 inaugural ball. [Untapped Cities]
  • Though subway delays are usually blamed on the antiquated system, recent issues were due to technology installed in 2006. [amNY]

 

Architecture, Greenwich Village, New Developments

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 17, 2018

Current side via Wikimedia; 799 Broadway Rendering via Perkins+Will

Plans for the office development proposed on the site of the former St. Denis Hotel in the East Village progressed last week, after Normandy Real Estate Partners filed new permit applications. Located at 799 Broadway, the 165-year-old hotel will be demolished and later replaced with a 12-story office building. New permits reveal a change in architects, from CetraRuddy to Perkins+Will as well as a slight shrinkage of space, from 190,000 to 183,000 square feet (h/t The Real Deal).

Find out more

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Prospect-Lefferts Gardens

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , April 17, 2018

Photo via CityRealty

Here’s your chance to live in pretty Prospect-Lefferts Gardens for, perhaps, less than the neighborhood’s market-rate rents. An affordable housing lottery is opening for seven units in a new, eight-story building at 212 Linden Boulevard. As 6sqft recently uncovered, many middle-income apartments throughout the city serve more to subsidize the truly affordable units, and therefore, don’t come in that much cheaper. Here, the homes are available to those earning 130 percent of the median income and range from $1,800/month studios to $2,714/month two-bedrooms. By comparison, the market-rate rentals range from $1,850/one bedrooms to $3,000/month two-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

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