MORE TOP STORIES

Bronx, Policy

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , October 10, 2019

Photo via Wiki Commons

The Vernon C. Bain Center, an 800-capacity floating jail in the East River, costs $24 million a year to operate and was supposed to be permanently shut down decades ago. Opened in 1992 to help with an overcrowded prison system due in part to the crack epidemic, the 625-foot-long motorless barge has been docked along New York City’s shoreline since then, the New York Times reports. And as the city plans to shut down Rikers Island, overhaul the criminal justice system, and create more humane jails with fewer inmates, advocates say the barge has to go. The city has pledged to close the facility once the City Council votes on the prison reform plan; both Rikers and Bain would close by 2026.

What happened to ‘temporary?’

Art

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , October 10, 2019

Projection at Rockefeller Center. For The City © 2005 Jenny Holzer, courtesy of Artists Rights Society (ARS)

Artist Jenny Holzer—known for her practice of displaying text in the public sphere—is partnering with Creative Time for the third time on a new public art project at Rockefeller Center. VIGIL is a series of light projections addressing gun violence in America through first-hand accounts, poems, and responses by Americans who have had to reckon with the everyday reality of gun violence. The words will be beamed across the iconic Midtown destination each night from October 10 to 12 beginning at 8 p.m.

More details

Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , October 10, 2019

Image courtesy of Douglas Elliman.

Bleecker Court at 77 Bleecker Street in the Village/Noho is mid-20th-century modernist in appearance, but it’s a neighborhood classic. This “loft” apartment has benefitted from a recent gut renovation and, asking $650,000, is 21st-century-ready. The home’s designer/owner created a magazine-worthy interior within the open, airy space, making the best of high ceilings and a wall of windows overlooking Mercer Street.

Look both ways

Featured Story

Features, History, yorkville

The hopping history of German breweries in Yorkville

By Lucie Levine, Thu, October 10, 2019

  • By Lucie Levine
  • , October 10, 2019

Jacob Ruppert’s Knickerbocker Beer, 1912, via Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division

If you spent the first weekend of October hoisting lager and Oomph-ing it up for Oktoberfest, then you joined a long and proud tradition of German beer production and consumption in New York City. In fact, New York’s German-owned breweries were once the largest beer-making operations in the country, and the brewers themselves grew into regional and national power-players, transforming Major League Baseball, holding elected office, and, perhaps most importantly, sponsoring goat beauty pageants in Central Park. While brewing flourished in both Manhattan and Brooklyn throughout the 19th century, the city’s largest breweries were clustered in Yorkville. In fact, much of the neighborhood’s storied German cultural history can be traced to the rise of brewing in the area, and the German-language shops, cultural institutions and social halls that sprang up to cater to the brewery workers.

Get more Hopping History Here!

Cool Listings, Tribeca

$1.75M Tribeca loft was once the Engine 29 firehouse

By Michelle Cohen, Wed, October 9, 2019

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , October 9, 2019

Images courtesy of Douglas Elliman

This 1,500-square-foot classic loft co-op, asking $1.75 million, is in a neighborhood filled with lofts. What makes this Tribeca home at 160 Chambers Street a bit different is its former life as the Engine 29 firehouse. Loft lovers will be happy to note that though it has been recently renovated, 12-foot tin ceilings, exposed brick walls, hardwood floors and oversized windows remain. Currently a walk-up, the coop plans to install an elevator.

Get an inside view of this historic space

Policy

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , October 9, 2019

Photo via Pexels

The names of some wealthy property owners in New York City will soon be made public under a new state law signed last month by Gov. Andrew Cuomo. In response to reports of illegal home conversions in Rockland County, state lawmakers drafted a bill to prevent buyers from purchasing homes through limited-liability companies. The new law requires the name and address of each member of the LLC for both buyers and sellers in New York State. According to the Wall Street Journal, the change in law may affect buyers of Manhattan real estate who wish to remain undisclosed.

Find out more

Restaurants, Williamsburg

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , October 9, 2019

Photo via Leonard J. DeFrancisci/Wiki Commons

The world-famous steakhouse in the shadows of the Williamsburg Bridge will finally start accepting online reservations, amNY reports. Opened 132 years ago, Peter Luger is the third oldest steakhouse in New York City, best known for its dry-aged steaks. After installing a new phone system, the restaurant learned first-hand that many diners were experiencing hours-long wait times trying to get a reservation. In fact, they were receiving up to 6,000 calls each day.

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Featured Story

Events, Features, holidays, More Top Stories

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , October 9, 2019

Image courtesy of the Central Park Conservancy.

Some say Halloween is New York City’s favorite holiday. And while those who indulge in its fright-fraught fun may celebrate in different ways, there’s a scare out there for everyone. We’re all under the spell of the fabulous Village Halloween Parade, from its history to its most avid participants; if that doesn’t satisfy your craving for fright-week fun, peruse our list of Halloween happenings from family-friendly to extra freaky.

Find something to BOO

Policy, Transportation

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , October 9, 2019

Photo by Ed Schipul / Flickr cc

In June, Governor Cuomo advocated for an MTA task force that would specifically address issues related to subway speeds. After an initial analysis, the Speed and Safety Task Force found that subways in 2019 were running slower than they did 20 years ago due in large part to a flawed signal system and deficient posting of speed limits. Using that information, the Task Force released this week its preliminary findings, which note that “train speeds could be increased by as much as 50 percent” if these issues are fixed.

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Construction Update, Hudson Square

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , October 9, 2019

Rendering of 550 Washington Street via COOKFOX

Construction has officially kicked off at Google’s massive new campus in Hudson Square. The tech company plans to open office space across three properties 315 Hudson Street, 345 Hudson Street, and 550 Washington Street, which formerly served as a freight terminal. The project involves a gut renovation of the terminal building and an addition of eight new floors. As CityRealty reported Tuesday, the northern sections of the St. John’s Terminal building are now demolished.

Get the details

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