MORE TOP STORIES

City Living, Soho

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , August 22, 2019

Rendering courtesy of Museum of Ice Cream

After a celebrity-sprinkled Meatpacking District pop-up three-years ago drew raves and Instagram likes from Beyonce and Kim Kardashian, The Museum of Ice Cream (MOIC) will open a 25,000-square-foot “flagship” location at 558 Broadway in Soho. The three-story permanent paean to frozen dessert will feature 13 installations devoted to creating “IRL experiences” in New York; the museum calls it “the future of retail” in a press release–and given the number of vacant storefronts in the neighborhood, they could well be right.

MMore MOIC this way

Williamsburg

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , August 22, 2019

Images courtesy of NYCEDC

City officials have announced that a major renovation is coming to East Williamsburg’s Moore Street Market, one of Brooklyn’s oldest public markets. $2.7 million will go toward improving the 15,000- square-foot facilities at 110 Moore Street. The market, which opened in 1941 and is also known as La Marqueta de Williamsburg, currently houses 15 vendors—fresh produce, seafood, groceries, specialty foods, and even a barbershop—and offers year-round events including cooking classes and small business seminars.

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City Living, Events

Help plant 500,000 daffodils around NYC to remember 9/11

By Alexandra Alexa, Wed, August 21, 2019

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , August 21, 2019

Image via Flickr cc

The annual Daffodil Project–launched by New Yorkers for Parks and NYC Parks in 2001 as a living memorial to September 11th–is now open for bulb requests. Each year, the initiative gives out approximately 500,000 free daffodil bulbs to individuals and groups to plant throughout New York City’s public spaces—in parks, schoolyards, community gardens, and street tree pits. More than 7.5 million bulbs have been planted since the project started. If you’re interested in participating, all you have to do is submit a request before September 5.

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affordable housing, housing lotteries, Policy, Top Stories

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 21, 2019

Via Creative Commons

New Yorkers applying for affordable housing no longer need to provide credit scores or social security numbers, making it easier for low-income and undocumented immigrant households to qualify, the city announced Wednesday. The Department of Housing Preservation and Development expanded the guidelines of its affordable housing lottery policy to allow applicants to show 12 months of positive rental history instead of a credit check run by a landlord. This erases the need for adult household members to provide a social security number or an individual tax identification number.

Get the details

New Developments, Prospect-Lefferts Gardens, Rentals

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , August 21, 2019

Renderings courtesy of the Moinian Group

The Moinian Group and Bushburg Properties have released interior renderings of the new 26-story tower with 467 rental residences at 123 Linden Boulevard in Brooklyn’s Prospect Lefferts Gardens. The new rental tower, known as PLG, was designed by Hill West Architects and Whitehall Interiors and will offer more than 50,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor amenity space including indoor and rooftop pools, a lounge, a fitness center with a sauna and steam room, a dog run, a game room, a co-working lounge and a golf simulator. The new building also boasts Downtown Brooklyn, Manhattan and Verrazano Bridge views. Studios start at $2,300/month; one-bedrooms at $2,475/month; two-bedrooms at $3,600/month; and three-bedrooms from $4,500/month; 30 percent of the building’s units will be below-market-rate housing.

Fancy amenities, this way

Long Island City, More Top Stories

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 21, 2019

Photo courtesy of sarahtarno on Flickr

The iconic red Pepsi-Cola sign in Long Island City got a new look on Tuesday. In partnership with the soda company, JetBlue began installing this week an illuminated logo, a blue arrow, and a picture of an airplane on the sign that overlooks the East River, as first reported by the Wall Street Journal. The signage, which will only be up until Oct. 1, advertises the airline’s switch from serving Coca-Cola to PepsiCo products earlier this summer.

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Midwood, Restaurants

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , August 21, 2019

Image via Flickr cc

When news broke yesterday that legendary Midwood pizzeria Di Fara was seized by authorities for failure to pay $167,506 in state taxes, many New Yorkers lamented the loss of what is widely considered to be the city’s best pizza—including Mayor Bill de Blasio. “Di Fara is THE best pizza place in New York City,” de Blasio tweeted early this morning. “I’m ready to do anything I can to get them reopened—as are thousands of New York City pizza-lovers.”

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Connecticut, Cool Listings, Quirky Homes

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , August 21, 2019

Just in case panoramic water views from one of the East Coast’s most sought-after spots isn’t enough, this meticulously renovated traditional home at 16 Marlow Court at the mouth of Cos Cob harbor on Long Island Sound in Fairfield County, CT, comes with its own .15 acre private island. Consider it an extension of your back porch, just another part of your $6.25 million private estate on 200 feet of direct water frontage with views of the harbor and the Riverside Yacht Club.

Get an eyeful of those views

Featured Story

Features, NYC Guides, Top Stories

Where to find New York City’s secret waterfalls

By Alexandra Alexa, Tue, August 20, 2019

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , August 20, 2019

New York state is home to many spectacular waterfalls that are worthy of any bucket list, but if you know where to look, there are a surprising amount of waterfalls to discover right here in the concrete jungle of New York City. They’re not all “secrets,” but they do tend to exist well off the beaten path, tucked into the more remote parts of Central Park or in small Midtown plazas. Once you’ve found one you’ll likely have a new favorite spot perfect for escaping the city’s unrelenting noise—if only for a short while.

Drown out the city at one of these 6 spots

Events, Restaurants

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 20, 2019

Via Flickr

It’s officially the dog days of summer. This week, New Yorkers can dine out with their four-legged friends at a number of restaurants during the city’s first-ever Dog Restaurant Week. Hosted by Petminded, an organization that helps owners travel with pets, the weeklong event includes special promotions at more than a dozen dog-friendly restaurants across the city.

More this way

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Lior Barak and Christine Blackburn PRESENT A THREE-PART SERIES

The Italian side of Williamsburg: History, famous joints, and today’s culture

  • By Michelle Cohen

Photo via Flickr cc

A bustling Brooklyn enclave that is today an impossibly trendy and diverse mix of glassy condos, hip new restaurants and storefronts, and unassuming multi-family homes in the northeast section of Williamsburg was one of New York City’s notable Italian-American neighborhoods for much of the 20th century. While it may not have the tourist cachet of Manhattan’s Little Italy–or the old-fashioned village-y coziness of Carroll Gardens–this swath of the ‘burg, bounded roughly by Montrose, Union, Richardson, and Humboldt Streets, was a little bit of Italy in its own right from the 1800s until as late as the 1990s. The north end of Graham Avenue was even christened Via Vespucci to commemorate the historic Italian-American community.

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