MORE TOP STORIES

Celebrities, More Top Stories, Recent Sales, Upper West Side 

  • By Annie Doge
  • , December 11, 2017

Bob Weinstein, founder of Dimension Films and co-founder of Miramax Films, which he started with his brother, disgraced producer Harvey Weinstein, has all but broken even on the sale of his Upper West Side townhouse. He bought the huge home at 39 West 70th Street for $15 million back in 2009 with ex-wife Annie Clayton. They listed it for $19 million last February and then dropped the price to $17.9 million earlier this month, but city records published today show that it was sold again for $15 million. Not only did the buyer get a bargain, but they’ll get to enjoy the home’s period details, rear garden, terraces, roof deck, and a gym with a half-sized basketball court.

See inside

Featured Story

Features, Green Design, photography, Sunset Park, The urban lens

  • By Hannah Frishberg
  • , December 11, 2017

All photographs © James and Karla Murray for 6sqft

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, we take a look at the inner workings of Sunset Park’s Sims Municipal Recycling Facility, from trash heaps to machinery to a learning center. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

The beauty of trash is not often lauded, but out on the Brooklyn waterfront, at Sunset Park’s Sims Municipal Recycling Facility, the process is oddly mesmerizing. En masse, the glass and plastic shards processed in the building’s bowels become a disposable rainbow, the sharp shapes of residential recyclables a testament to the mesmerizing aesthetic of large-scale sustainability.

Sims is located on the 11-acre 30th Street Pier, which also contains the city’s first commercial-scale wind turbine. On Sims’ second story is a recycling education center; surrounding its exterior are a number of nature-harboring reefs, moorings, and native plants; and on the roof is an observation deck. The plant sorts 800 tons of recyclables on 2.5 miles worth of conveyor belts and machines daily, the majority of NYC’s “commingled curbside material,” its site proudly purports. In total, the plant processes 200,000 tons of plastic, glass, and metal a year. Ahead, take a look at the Sims world, where trash is heaped so high it really does look like treasure if you squint.

Take a tour

City Living, holidays, More Top Stories

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , December 11, 2017

A Christmas tree stand at 6th Avenue and 14th Street. Image: 6sqft

Each year in December, scores of Christmas tree vendors descend on New York City from as far as Quebec to turn the city’s sidewalks into a virtual pop-up forest. What makes this seasonal opportunity so appealing? The “coniferous tree” exception, a City Council law dating from 1938, says vendors can sell and display Christmas trees on a sidewalk in December without a permit as long as they get an ok from adjacent building owners and they don’t block the sidewalk. Sellers lobby adjacent storefronts for permission, sometimes paying a fee and often in competition with other sellers. This year, as the New York Times reports, competition from chain stores–and other vendors jockeying for prime spots in parks and other public locations that come with high fees–are chopping into the profits for the army of tree sellers that descends on the city at holiday time. Costs get passed to consumers–and prices are soaring.

Why trees are demanding more green this year

Major Developments, Policy, Upper West Side 

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , December 11, 2017

Architecture firm Snøhetta revealed last month their design for a 775-foot condominium tower at 50 West 66th Street, slated to be the tallest building on the Upper West Side. Developed by Extell, the condo will rise 69 stories and contain 127 units, featuring series of “sculptural excavations” that are “evocative of the chiseled stone of Manhattan’s geologic legacy,” according to the architects. As the New York Times reported, critics of the project from the UWS community say the tower would violate zoning restrictions in the area. Local advocate groups, joined by Council Member Helen Rosenthal and Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, are pushing back against the construction of Extell’s ultra-luxury tower. In a statement, Rosenthal said, “We will fight this project with every tool at our disposal.”

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Historic Homes, Recent Sales, Upper East Side

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , December 11, 2017

Google Streetview of 12 East 69th Street

A 20,000-square-foot Upper East Side mansion–complete with its own red velvet movie theater, panic room, and double-height library, has entered contract priced at $80 million. And according to the Wall Street Journal, if it closes at that price the property will become the most expensive townhouse ever sold in New York City. The sale would beat out a record set just this year, when the 25,000-square-foot, 41-foot-wide townhouse at 19 East 64th Street belonging to art heir David Wildenstein closed for $79.5 million. This home, located at 12 East 69th Street, came on the market in 2013 for roughly $114 million but was delisted after a price cut to $98 million in 2014.

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Celebrities, Recent Sales, Upper West Side 

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , December 11, 2017

Comedian Joy Behar‘s three-bedroom Astor Court co-op at 205 West 89th street has entered contract a mere two months after it was listed for $3.5 million. “The View” co-host has been doing her share of real estate restructuring recently: 6sqft reported last month that Behar and husband Steve Janowitz dropped $2.4 million on a three-bedroom Lincoln Square condo at 62 West 62nd Street about 20 blocks south. Behar had traded up to the larger Astor Court unit in 2013, having previously lived in a smaller apartment in the building. In 2016 she sold her Hamptons vacation home; a month later she dropped nearly $5 million on a gorgeous property in Sag Harbor.

Get a final glance

From Our Partners

  • By Metro New York
  • , December 8, 2017

Photo courtesy of the Brooklyn Ballet

George Balanchine staged his first iconic performance of The Nutcracker in New York City back in 1954. His choreography rightly became the gold standard, but the city has changed since then.

Enter the Brooklyn Ballet, which has reinterpreted the holiday story to reflect its home into The Brooklyn Nutcracker, mixing the borough’s history as an old Dutch colony with contemporary Flatbush Avenue. “This production is very much attached to Brooklyn and its ethnic diversity,” says Brooklyn Ballet director and choreographer Lynn Parkerson.

READ MORE AT METRO NEW YORK…

affordable housing, Architecture, Landscape Architecture, New Developments, Nolita

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , December 8, 2017

Rendering courtesy of Curtis + Ginsberg Architects

After years of public battles between open space advocates and public officials, the city announced on Friday that it will create an affordable senior housing development at the site of the Elizabeth Street Garden in Nolita. Dubbed Haven Green, the project will be an energy-efficient passive house, with units reserved for seniors earning between $20,040 and $40,080, as well as formerly homeless seniors. According to the Daily News, the project calls for 121 deeply affordable units with 7,600 square feet of public open space in a new garden. Developed by Pennrose Properties, Habitat for Humanity New York City, and RiseBoro Community Partnerships, Haven Green will use 60 to 70 percent less energy than a standard building of its kind and will be designed to manage and reuse stormwater through permeable surfaces.

More this way

Featured Story

apartment living 101, Features

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , December 8, 2017

“Vintage” furniture and decor is no stranger to young, urban professionals, with the proliferation of markets like Brooklyn Flea and do-good stores like Housing Works. But rarely do fine antiques enter the equation, often being tossed aside for their higher price points. But the antiques market has undergone a major shift in recent years, and no one has been more privy to it than Ben Macklowe, the second-generation president of the Macklowe Gallery who describes collecting as “the intersection of passion, taste and happenstance.”

After standing as a fixture on Madison Avenue for nearly 50 years, gaining international recognition for its collection of French Art Nouveau furniture and objects, Tiffany lamps and glassware, and antique and estate jewelry, the gallery recently relocated to a 6,000-square-foot space on 57th Street and Park Avenue, which, according to Ben is “thanks to our existing clients and a new generation of passionate collectors.” For this new generation, Ben believes the time is ripe to start collecting. Antiques are sustainable by nature, they lend themselves to cultural exploration, and, because of a generational shift, are more affordable than ever.

Ahead, we break down the top-three reasons to start an antique collection.

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Policy, Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , December 8, 2017

Photo of the Brooklyn Bridge via pixabay

Dubbed the “Times Square in the Sky,” the Brooklyn Bridge promenade remains the borough’s most popular attraction, experiencing an increase in pedestrian volume by 275 percent between 2008 and 2015. The New York City Department of Transportation released a report on Friday that details ways to reduce the growing congestion of cyclists, pedestrians and vendors on the promenade. After hiring the consulting term AECOM over a year ago to conduct an engineering study aimed at improving safety, DOT has finally outlined steps to be taken in order to limit crowds. As the New York Times reported, the city is exploring ideas like building a separate bike-only entrance to the Manhattan side of the bridge, possibly expanding the width of the promenade and reducing the number of vendors allowed to sell goods, while restricting where they can sell them.

More this way

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