MORE TOP STORIES

History, Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 20, 2017

Peter Samson, standing in the center, and his teammates during the failed 1966 run. From the New York Herald-Tribune, via the Queens Borough Public Library

In May of 1940, electric railroad enthusiast Herman Rinke became the first person to tour the entire New York City subway system on a single token, putting in 25 some hours underground all for fun. After reading about Rinke’s journey, Peter Samson, a computer software engineer who later invented the world’s first video game Spacewar, decided to take a stab at making his own record. As the Times recounts, he formed the Amateur New York Subway Riding Committee (ANYSRC) to develop rules for the challenge. After one failed attempt in 1966, Samson, with the help of 15 volunteers and a computer program that tracked the fastest route, completed the trip in 25 hours, 50 minutes and 30 seconds on April 21, 1967. Since then, the subway challenge has taken off for puzzle and transit lovers worldwide.

Find out more

Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

  • By Lori Zimmer
  • , April 20, 2017

In a city where hundreds of interesting events occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top picks for 6sqft readers!

Photography lovers are in for a treat this week: New York legend Martha Cooper opens a new exhibition of her photographs of graffiti in the 1970s and 80s; historic works from India by iconic street photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson are on show at the Rubin Museum; and touching portraits of West Africa by young photographer Anne Barlinckhoff are being showcased at The Quin. If you need a break from real life, take in the immersive and contemplative installation of Doug Wheeler, or float away on Pinaree Sanpitak’s meditative piece at Brookfield Place. Finally, join in on an Earth Day conversation in Times Square, or take in the work of “forgotten “ New York street artist Richard Hambelton in an event happening one night only.

More on all the best events this way

affordable housing, Greenpoint, housing lotteries

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , April 20, 2017

The waitlist is open for $2,611/month two-bedroom apartments at Greenpoint‘s super-trendy rental Eleven33, which goes out of its way to check all the boxes in terms of “Brooklyn living” — from a cyber café with an espresso bar to a landscaped rooftop terrace to a fitness center complete with CrossFit equipment. The affordable housing lottery is open to middle-income households of two, three, and four people earning between $106,080 and $158,550 annually.

Find out if you qualify here

Midtown East

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , April 20, 2017

Boston Properties, who owns the former General Motors Building at 767 Fifth Avenue that has the Apple flagship located on its lower level, was issued a permit by the Department of Buildings to remove the iconic glass cube outside the store’s entrance. The Post reports that it’ll cost a staggering $2 million to take the structure down while Apple expands the Midtown location from 32,000 to 77,000 square feet.

Read more

Cool Listings, Park Slope

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , April 20, 2017

You don’t hear much about the “townhouse alternative,” as homeowners are more focused on the space and freedom of having a house, even if it’s a small “condo alternative.” But this high-floor, graciously arranged and elegantly detailed pre-war condominium at the park’s edge in prime Park Slope asking $1.895 million has as much living space as a small house, without the stairs and expensive repairs. The three-bedroom home at 163 Prospect Park West also boasts a collection of subtle, sophisticated renovations–like concrete sinks in the master bath and dark, elegant walls in the den.

Tour this most satisfying apartment

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Starchitecture, Upstate

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 19, 2017

As any modern architecture aficionado knows, the Glass House is Philip Johnson‘s best-known residence. However, it’s not his first. That title goes to the Booth House, built in 1946 (three years prior to the New Canaan beauty) in rural Bedford, New York. Like the Glass House, it boasts Johnson’s iconic floor-to-ceiling glazing, location atop a grass podium, and internal organization around a central fireplace. But unlike the Glass House, now a historic house museum, the Booth House is not protected, and moreover, its title is in litigation which means it could very well face the wrecking ball. Therefore, Archpaper tells us that the long-time owners have listed the home for $1 million in hopes that a preservation-minded buyer will step up.

Find out more

Green Design, Products, Technology

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 19, 2017

Thanks to Growkit, a farming kit for beginners developed by Portugal-based startup Noocity, city dwellers short on time and space can still take a stab at gardening and harvest their own organic food (h/t Gearminded). The kit includes an entire gardening system–a Growbag irrigated planter, a Growpack with seasonal plants, potting soil, fertilizer, and step-by-step audio instructions–all delivered right to your doorstep.

Find out more

Cobble Hill, Cool Listings, Interiors

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , April 19, 2017

This may be a traditional Brooklyn brownstone on the outside, but the duplex rental occupying its parlor and garden floors looks as modern as it gets. The home, located at 284 Warren Street in Cobble Hill, underwent a gut renovation in 2007 and has been occupied by the same owner ever since. They’re now renting out the bottom two floors for $8,500 a month, and any new renter is going to like one thing in particular, especially with summer coming up–a double-height wall of glass that frames the private, stone-paved backyard.

This way for a tour

From Our Partners

  • By Metro New York
  • , April 19, 2017

He’s going to spell it out for you: art feeds young minds.

Pierre Francillon has a dream to fill the outer walls of Prospect Lefferts Gardens with building-sized flashcards to catch the eyes of the area’s fastest growing population: kids under 10. And with the help of a team of emerging and established artists, he hopes to have all 26 letters of the alphabet, each linked to a landmark or idea associated with the surroundings, glinting in the sunlight by mid-summer.

FIND OUT MORE AT METRO NY…

Architecture, Starchitecture, Technology

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 19, 2017

As part of its relaunch, Google Earth, a program that allows users to explore the planet virtually, now features guided tours of projects by various architects, like Frank Gehry and the late Zaha Hadid. As ArchDaily learned, the relaunch allows users to orbit the entire globe in 3D, instead of simply exploring isolated cities. It also enhanced the web application’s accessibility, with searches within the app providing snapshots of information about the places. Plus, using the app is free of charge and users do not have to pay or install any software.

Explore the Google Earth relaunch

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Williamsburg

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , April 19, 2017

This rental building at 66 Ainslie Street may look like your quintessential warehouse conversion, but it was actually built from the ground up last year, designed by Aufgang Architects to blend in with East Williamsburg‘s trendy industrial vibe. Of its 50 apartments, 10 are reserved for those earning 60 percent of the area median income. These units include two $833/month studios and eight $895/month one-bedrooms and, as of tomorrow, are up for grabs through the city’s affordable housing lottery.

Find out if you qualify

Cool Listings, Williamsburg

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , April 19, 2017

The 1,800-square-foot pre-war loft in the Northside Arts Industries Condominium is as classic as it gets, with impossibly high ceilings, exposed brick, wood beams and pipes and a flexible layout. The New York Times tells us that the building was developed back in 1983, when the neighborhood’s north side was a burned-out jumble of factories, ethnic enclaves and a smattering of artists. The latter had come to escape Soho rents, taking over abandoned factories and warehouses and paying rents that averaged around $550 a month for a one-bedroom apartment. In 1986, a loft space in the building could be rented for $5 a square foot. Today, a sprawling home at 119 North 11th Street asks $8,500 a month ($57 a foot) and the trendy and amenity-packed neighborhood’s artists have (mostly) escaped eastward once again.

Find out more about this totally 21st century loft

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Nomad

  • By Annie Doge
  • , April 18, 2017

There’s no “debating” that NBC Nightly News and Dateline NBC anchor Lester Holt has good taste in real estate, as evidenced by the listing photos for his classy Nomad apartment. The fact that his wife, Carol Hagen-Holt, is one of the listing brokers probably doesn’t hurt either. The Observer first noticed that the couple put the three-bedroom spread at 225 Fifth Avenue on the market for $6.6 million, a far cry from the $3.3 million they bought it for in 2007. It boasts views of Madison Square Park and the Flatiron Building, a private terrace, and a sumptuous mix of furnishings and decor.

Take a look around

City Living

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 18, 2017

While loud noise has been found to be harmful, new research shows residents who live in the loudest NYC neighborhoods may be healthier than residents living in quieter nabes. According to a study by NYU Langone Medical Center, neighborhoods that called in the most noise complaints to 311 had residents with a lower body mass index and blood pressure (h/t Metro NY). While researchers do not believe the actual noise is behind the healthier numbers, the study points to an area’s walkability to be a contributing factor to the health of residents.

Find out more

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Upstate

  • By Annie Doge
  • , April 18, 2017

Allan Houston, a former Knicks basketball player and current assistant general manager of the team, is selling his massive, almost 20,000-square-foot French revival home in Westchester County for just under $20 million. As the New York Post learned, the home located in Conyers Farm, a private gated community that borders Greenwich, Connecticut and Armonk, New York, has seven bedrooms and 10 marble bathrooms. Although it’s been on and off the market, sources told the Post that Houston wants to move his wife Tamara and their seven children to Manhattan in order to be closer to work. Facing Converse Lake, the expansive residence features a custom-designed basketball court, movie theater, trophy room, heated outdoor pool and, golf putting green.

See the Westchester estate

Featured Story

Features, Interiors, More Top Stories, MY SQFT HOUSE TOURS

  • By Diane Pham
  • , April 18, 2017

6sqft’s ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to the West Village apartment of podcasting pioneer and DJ Suzy Chase. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

Years ago, when Suzy Chase was presented with the opportunity to bring every piece of furniture from her childhood Kansas home to NYC, there was no question of what she’d take, but rather how she’d take it all with her. Steeped in a bounty of antiques and heirlooms, Suzy knew she could never part with the items that she loved so much growing up. So, rather than putting it all into storage, she made the decision to clear out her family’s 900-square-foot West Village apartment and fill it with as much of her Kansas furniture as possible.

While many of you are probably asking why she didn’t consider selling or donating these items, there is, of course, a twist to this story, and her situation is one that is quite unique: She’s a descendant of the Chase family, one of the United States’ most important political families.

Ahead, have a look inside Suzy’s home, a modestly sized two-bedroom filled with relics from the Revolutionary and Civil wars, centuries-old paintings, rare books and photographs, and countless other objects that were on American soil well before the Mayflower even touched Plymouth Rock.

see more inside here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Interiors, Interviews

  • By Michelle Colman
  • , April 18, 2017

The Brooklyn Home Company (THBCo) is a family-run cooperative of artists and builders that develop unique residential spaces in booming Brooklyn. Best described as white and wood but never cookie cutter, their work is always light and airy, and blend modern style with historic elements. It’s this signature style that’s made THBCo a favorite amongst both renovators and Pinterest enthusiasts alike.

But what inspires their designs and how do they decide where to develop projects? Ahead, 6sqft speaks to THBCo’s co-founder and Head of Operations, Bill Caleo, about the business. Find out how this family-run establishment firmly roots itself in working with local makers, how they’ve grown their business model to include sustainability, and why they always add a custom piece of art to all their homes.

our interview with bill here

Art, hudson yards, Urban Design

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 18, 2017

First Piece of Vessel Installed 04.18.2017 – courtesy of Related-Oxford

The standard for public art spaces has officially reached new heights. Today, the installation has begun on Vessel, an innovative landmark designed by Heatherwick Studio at Hudson Yards. As 6sqft previously wrote, the project’s idea stems from Related Companies‘ chairman Stephen Ross, who chose Heatherwick to design the $200 million (up as of today from the original $150 million estimate) large-scale piece of art. After being fabricated and constructed in Monfalcone, Italy, the first ten pieces of the 150-foot-tall steel structure arrived in January at the Port of Newark via ship and then traveled across the Hudson River. And as of this morning, Ross was on site to mark the first of these massive components (they each weigh close to 100,000 pounds) being put into place by crane.

See photos from Vessel’s installation and watch a video of Stephen Ross’ remarks

affordable housing, Chelsea, housing lotteries

  • By Diane Pham
  • , April 18, 2017

TF Cornerstone is once again accepting applications for affordable studio, one- and two-bedroom units at their very well located Chelsea Centro rental at 200-220 West 26th Street. The full-time doorman building was erected in 2001 and boasts an 80/20 mix of low-income and market-rate units. As noted by the NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development, TF will be accepting applications from qualifying individuals and families until all the building’s affordable vacancies have been filled and its waiting list replenished. The current units up for grabs range from $1,215 per month for a studio up to $1,574 per month for a comfortable two-bedroom spread.

find out if you qualify here

City Living, Policy

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , April 18, 2017

Image: Jazz Guy via flickr

Though it’s not too hard to understand the logic behind a mansion tax, a bagel tax…oy vey! Next time you hit your local bagel shop, know that if you get your breakfast sliced–or heaven forbid, with schmear–you’ll get smacked with an 8.875 percent sales tax. If you eat it in the store, (even if it’s still whole), boom, more tax.

The folks at Turbotax explain that, “the state adds an eight-cent tax to any altered bagels,” which includes, “bagel sandwiches (served buttered or with spreads, or otherwise as a sandwich)” or even just sliced for you. According to the New York state Department of Taxation and Finance, “Generally, food and food products sold by food stores are exempt from sales tax.” That bagel loses its exemption when it is “sold heated; it is sold for consumption on the premises; or it has been prepared by the seller and is ready to be eaten, whether for on premises or off premises consumption.”

In honor of Tax Day, we ask: What’s with this bagel tax?

Cool Listings, Interiors, Tribeca

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , April 18, 2017

Inside this massive Tribeca penthouse you’ve got custom marble, bronze and mahogany details, not to mention light fixtures crafted by a Steampunk designer. The spectacular pad spans two floors over 5,100 square feet and holds four bedrooms and six bathrooms. Outside, over 2,500 square feet, there’s a fully irrigated and planted terrace, as well as a roof deck complete with an outdoor kitchen and heated infinity pool. Simply put: anywhere you go at this penthouse apartment, now asking $21 million at the Tribeca condo 169 Hudson Street, you will be impressed.

So see the rest of the space

Cool Listings, Interiors, Park Slope

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 17, 2017

Located just one block from Park Slope’s 5th Avenue hub, a beautiful, Miles Redd-designed townhouse is listed for $3,495,000. The South Slope home at 258 11th Street has been totally renovated and rebuilt, with custom wall coverings and custom-mixed Farrow & Ball paint, but it still boasts that Brooklyn brownstone charm. Plus, the 3,334-square-foot beauty has four bedrooms, a moody home theater, and a magical private garden.

See the Park Slope townhome

Hotels, Policy

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 17, 2017

With its value nearing $30 billion dollars, it’s hard to deny Airbnb’s influence and disruption in the American hotel industry. Since its founding in 2008, the short-term lodging company has serviced about 150 million travelers, in three million listings in more than 191 countries. And as the New York Times reported, the hotel industry has launched a plan to take action against the company’s growing market share. The plan includes a national campaign at the local, state and federal levels to counter Airbnb by lobbying politicians and attorneys general to reduce the number of Airbnb hosts and fund studies that show they do not collect hotel taxes and are not required to follow the same safety and security regulations that hotels must follow.

Find out more

City Living, Top Stories, Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , April 17, 2017

To celebrate the ahead-of-schedule launch of the Citywide Ferry service, Mayor de Blasio rode the first ferry (named “Lunchbox” by second graders from Bay Ridge) this morning into Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Pier 1 as part of an official dedication ceremony. Beginning May 1st, all New Yorkers can join in the revelry when the new Rockaway Route and the existing East River Route kick off. Service to South Brooklyn starts in June, and the Astoria route will be launched sometime in August. In all, there will be 21 stops added throughout the city as part of the expanded service. On top of today’s festivities, the city also released the official new ferry schedules.

See the NYC Ferry routes

From Our Partners

City’s PoetweetNYC poetry contest begins today

By Metro New York, Mon, April 17, 2017

  • By Metro New York
  • , April 17, 2017

This one is for the subway writers. The city’s annual PoetweetNYC Twitter poetry contest, celebrating National Poetry Month, is open for submissions today at 9 a.m. through April 27 at 5 p.m. Contest winners and their poems, selected by mayoral first lady Chirlane McCray and a panel of four other judges, will appear here in Metro New York on Poem in Your Pocket Day—April 27.

FIND OUT MORE AT METRO NY…

Featured Story

Design, Features, Green Design, Toolbox Tutorials

Toolbox Tutorials: Learn to make a simple macramé plant hanger

By Igor Josifovic and Judith de Graaff, Mon, April 17, 2017

  • By Igor Josifovic and Judith de Graaff
  • , April 17, 2017

6sqft’s new series Toolbox Tutorials shares step-by-step guides for simple, affordable DIY projects. This week, Igor Josifovic and Judith de Graaff, founders of Urban Jungle Bloggers and authors of the new book “Urban Jungle: Living and Styling With Plants,” teach us how to make an easy macramé plant hanger. Have a project you’d like to share? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

In small apartments, the valuable real estate on shelves and windowsills gets used up fast, but don’t let this deter you from bringing in some greenery. Even if your flat surfaces aren’t available, there’s always room for a hanging plant, which can be suspended from the ceiling, a wall or window, or a doorknob that’s not used on a daily basis. To do this, we’re showing you how to make macramé hangers for anything from regular terracotta pots to colorful salad bowls that have rounded bottoms.

The illustrated, step-by-step guide ahead

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Upper East Side

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , April 17, 2017

The price is right, but the location may not be the most desirable for this new affordable housing building, as it’s situated directly alongside the off-ramp to the Queensboro Bridge. Traffic views aside (we’re hoping they installed sound-proof windows), these 20 apartments at 321 East 60th Street include $1,254/month one-bedrooms and $1,511/month two-bedrooms for those earning 80 percent of the area median income.

More on the project here

Cool Listings, Interiors, Upper East Side

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , April 17, 2017

This is a prime Upper East Side location if we’ve ever seen one: the three-bedroom co-op at 1016 Fifth Avenue is located directly across from the Metropolitan Museum of Art with unobstructed views. After a full renovation the apartment has hit the market for $5.495 million. (It last sold in 2011 for $3.35 million.) It’s undeniably luxurious, and not just because of the location. The apartment is only one of two when you exit the elevator, and the interior is flanked with columns, built-in bookcases, a fireplace and much more.

Take a look

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Lower East Side

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , April 17, 2017

At the beginning of last month, the first affordable housing lottery opened for Essex Crossing at Beyer Blinder Belle‘s huge mixed-use building 145 Clinton Street, where 104 below-market rate units were up for grabs. As of today, the second lottery is open, this time at Dattner Architects175 Delancey Street, a 14-story, 100-unit building at the megadevelopment’s site 6 that will also offer ground-floor retail, medical offices for NYU Langone, and a senior center and job training facility from the Grand Street Settlement. These 99 one-bedroom apartments are set aside for one- and two-person households that have at least one resident who is 55 years of age or older. They’re also earmarked for those earning 0, 30, 40, 60, and 90 percent of the area median income and range from $396/month to $1,254/month.

Find out if you qualify

Boerum Hill, Cool Listings, Interiors

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , April 16, 2017

If you love the historic aesthetic of the Brooklyn brownstone, this Boerum Hill duplex will charm you. It’s located on the top two floors of 433 Pacific Street, a 19th century rowhouse that’s well intact. Any renter willing to pay $6,100 a month will have the benefit of living alongside two working fireplaces with marble mantlepieces, refinsihed original wide-plank floors and the original moldings. The listing says the space boasts “wonderful character,” and we can’t disagree.

Take the interior tour

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