MORE TOP STORIES

Landscape Architecture, Upper West Side 

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , November 12, 2020

All photos courtesy of Elizabeth Felicella

New photos of the public park at the Waterline Square development were released this week, showing off the nearly three acres of green space designed by MNLA. Positioned in the middle of the three glassy Upper West Side towers, Waterline Square Park offers a tucked-away oasis for the community, along with a huge playground and unique water features. When it officially opened this summer, the park hosted a number of socially-distanced events including live music performances and yoga classes. See it here

Policy

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , November 11, 2020

Photo by Eden, Janine and Jim via Flickr cc

With the COVID positivity rate rising across the state, and with neighboring states of Connecticut and New Jersey seeing major spikes, Governor Cuomo today put in place new restrictions to curb the spread. Restaurants and bars will have to close at 10pm; after that time they can offer curbside takeout and delivery for food only. Gyms will also have to close at 1opm. And both indoor and outdoor gatherings at private residences will be limited to no more than 10 people. These are the three main spreaders that were identified by state contact-tracers. The rules go into effect at 1opm this Friday, November 13th.

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Featured Story

Features, Harlem, History

  • By Lucie Levine
  • , November 11, 2020

New York’s famous 369th (Old 15th) Infantry Regiment arrives home from France. From the National Archives via Wikimedia Commons

By the end of World War II, the Croix de Guerre, France’s highest military honor, would be awarded to the 369th Infantry Regiment. Better known as the Harlem Hellfighters, the regiment was an all-black American unit serving under French command in World War I, and they spent a stunning 191 days at the Front, more than any other American unit. In that time, they never lost a trench to the enemy or a man to capture. Instead, they earned the respect of both allies and enemies, helped introduce Jazz to France, and returned home to a grateful city where hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers turned out to welcome home 3,000 Hellfighter heroes in a victory parade that stretched from 23rd Street and 5th Avenue to 145th Street and Lenox.

The whole history

Events, More Top Stories

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , November 11, 2020

Photo courtesy of Macy’s, Inc.

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade has been a New York City tradition since 1924. In modern times, the event draws a live crowd of roughly 3.5 million and is made up of 8,000 participants, including performers, marching bands, dancers, and more. But those large numbers of people mean that this year’s pandemic-era parade will look a bit different. Macy’s announced in September that its 94th annual parade will be a television-only presentation with participant capacity reduced by 75 percent, a two-day staging, and balloons being flown by vehicles instead of the usual 80- to 100-person teams that corral each balloon. A New York Times feature today shared the happy news that actors from four shuttered Broadway shows will be performing.

Find out more

Featured Story

Cool Listings, Features, real estate trends

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , November 11, 2020

Sharing space with roommates in a small New York City apartment has never been easy. But doing so during a pandemic while many are still working from home? Almost impossible. As winter approaches and takes safe outdoor activities with it, now may be a good time to look for your own apartment. And with average rents still down compared to the same period last year, you’re more likely to scoop up a decent deal. For those ready to ditch the roommates, we’ve found five studio apartments perfect for one, from a sunny Sutton Place rental for $1,538/month to a $2,479/month junior one-bedroom with amenities in Gramercy Park.

Details this way

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Upstate

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , November 11, 2020

Photo credit: Andrea B. Swenson for Ellis Sotheby’s International Realty

As a partner in the Beaux-Arts architectural firm McKim, Mead & White, Stanford White designed the Washington Square Arch, the Villard Houses, and the Gould Library, among so many others. He also designed the most private residences of the three men, including this late-19th century, shingly Colonial in Rockland County. Located in the Hudson River-front town of Piermont, the four-bedroom home has a striking semi-circular window, tons of original paneled woodwork and doors, and four beautiful fireplaces. After remaining in the same family for four generations, it’s now up for sale asking $1,275,000.

See inside

Cool Listings, Upstate

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , November 10, 2020

Photo credit: Courtesy Corcoran Country Living

In Germantown, a converted post and beam barn has hit the market for $3.6 million. Presently a three-story home with three bedrooms, the property at 114 Best Lane offers an eclectic take on the classic farmhouse, with high, wood-beamed ceilings and four massive fireplaces. Constructed in 1865, the Hudson Valley home has been restored as an artistic indoor-outdoor living oasis, which also includes an adjacent “guest barn” and nearly 15 acres of land.

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Midtown, Transportation, Urban Design

Can Times Square ever be completely car-free?

By Devin Gannon, Tue, November 10, 2020

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , November 10, 2020

Rendering courtesy of 3deluxe

It’s been over ten years since cars were first banned in some sections of Times Square. Is it time for additional street closures along bustling Broadway? In a new design study, the Germany-based architecture firm 3deluxe has reimagined Times Square to prioritize pedestrians and cyclists, trading vehicular traffic lanes for recreational activities, landscaped features, and public transportation. The concept comes as New York and other cities continue to reexamine the value of safe public space as the fight to control the coronavirus pandemic continues.

Get the details

City Living, Policy

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , November 10, 2020

Credit: Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office.

For the sixth straight day, New York City’s COVID positivity rate has been above 2 percent, today hitting 2.88 percent. Though this is lower than surrounding states (New Jersey has recently hit 8 percent), Mayor de Blasio’s education plan has set a threshold of 3 percent for keeping schools open. And according to the city’s data, the number of new daily infections has nearly doubled since August from roughly 300 to a whopping 976 last Wednesday. Yesterday, Mayor de Blasio said the city was “getting dangerously close” to a second wave, setting off an alarm among New Yorkers, and today he said, “this is our last chance to stop [it].”

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Harlem, New Developments, Rentals

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , November 10, 2020

Photo courtesy of NOISE

Living in a starchitect-designed apartment building is now slightly more attainable. The Smile, a new rental tower in East Harlem designed by BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group, has officially opened. The 11-story tower at 158 East 126th Street, named for its grin-like shape, contains 233 apartments, 70 of which are affordable. Leasing kicked off in September, with pricing for the market-rate rentals starting at roughly $2,056/month. New photos released this week take us inside the minimalist model residences and the impressive amenity package that is tailored to those working from home, including a co-working studio and a rooftop with a plunge pool, three whirlpools, and an outdoor movie theater.

Find out more

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