MORE TOP STORIES

Cool Listings, Hamptons

$10M Montauk home has a rooftop pool overlooking the ocean

By Dana Schulz, Fri, September 11, 2020

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , September 11, 2020

Photos courtesy of Compass

With views like this, why wouldn’t you put the pool on the roof? Set on a full acre on a high bluff on the shores of Montauk, this three-level contemporary home is party-ready inside and out. Asking $9,995,000, the house has 6,000 square feet of interior space, five bedrooms, and 4,000 square feet of outdoor space including the rooftop and another level of outdoor lounges.

See inside

City Living, Events

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , September 11, 2020

Salt-N-Pepa’s “Push It” leather jackets; Photo courtesy of Sotheby’s

Next week, Sotheby’s will host its first-ever hip hop auction with iconic memorabilia from the music movement that got its start in New York City. One of the biggest items of the auction, which will be held live on September 15, is the crown worn by Brooklyn-born Biggie Smalls during the 1997 “King of New York” photo shoot, the last portrait of the rapper before he was killed just days later. Another amazing item at the auction includes over 20 love letters penned by a 16-year-old Tupac Shakur to his high school sweetheart.

Find out more

History, maps, Meatpacking District

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , September 11, 2020

1885 map showing 13th Avenue, via the New York Public Library

You may be scratching your head at the mention of the 13th Avenue in Manhattan, but it does exist–and it’s the shortest avenue in the whole city with a fascinating history behind it. The minuscule stretch covers prime Meatpacking District real estate, just west of 11th Avenue and between Little West 12th Street and Gansevoort Street. The single block across the West Side Highway is unmarked, but officially known as Gansevoort Peninsula. The avenue was created by the city in 1837, and in no way was intended to be so short. In fact, by the mid-1800s 13th Avenue encompassed nearly 15 blocks and was planned to stretch all the way up to 135th Street. But the block never left Chelsea and was mostly destroyed by the city at the turn of the century.

Read all about the life and death of the Avenue

Central Park South, condos, Cool Listings, New Developments

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , September 11, 2020

Penthouse 72 Loggia, courtesy of 111 West 57th Street

Two new impressive units just hit the market at New York City’s most slender supertall. At 111 West 57th Street, a three-level, four-bedroom penthouse with over 7,000 square feet of interior space and an additional 1,367 square feet in private outdoor space with picture-perfect views over Central Park has hit the market for $66 million. And a duplex with three bedrooms and unobstructed park views is now asking $39.5 million. The latest multi-million dollar listings at the Billionaires’ Row tower come after two $30 million units sold earlier this summer during the coronavirus shut down, giving a boost to the city’s nearly stagnant luxury market.

Learn more

Cool Listings, Greenwood, Park Slope

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , September 11, 2020

Photos courtesy of The Corcoran Group

Just north of Green-Wood Cemetery, on the border of Greenwood Heights and Park Slope, this two-bedroom condo is asking $899,000. The apartment is located at 259 21st Street, a 1905 schoolhouse converted into lofts. The transformation left this unit with original oversized arched windows and 12.5-foot-high beamed ceilings, and the owner’s creative touch added a cool wall of built-in bookshelves that frames both of the sleeping areas.

See some more

Events, Lower East Side, Museums

Tenement Museum restarts outdoor walking tours

By Dana Schulz, Thu, September 10, 2020

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , September 10, 2020

A young Tenement Museum member was treated to an advance tour after starting her own fundraising for the museum and raising $1,000. Photo by Gemma Solomons

The pandemic has taken its toll on almost every New York City museum, but the Lower East Side’s Tenement Museum has had it especially hard. Because of the cramped quarters of the historic tenement houses that make up the museum, they’ve been unable to reopen indoors. As NY1 reported in late July, the museum laid off 76 part-time employees, 71 of whom were tour guides. But there’s now a glimmer of hope for the museum that educates people on the history of immigration to New York in the 19th and 20th centuries. They will be restarting their outdoor walking tours for single household groups beginning this weekend.  Read more

More Top Stories, Policy, Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , September 10, 2020

Photo: Marc A. Hermann / MTA New York City Transit on Flickr

Riders on public transit in New York who refuse to wear a face mask will now be fined $50, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority announced Thursday. Starting Monday, riders of the city’s subway and buses, the Long Island Rail Road, and Metro-North will be subject to the new penalty for not complying with the mandatory face-covering rule, put in place by executive order in April.

More here

Featured Story

Cool Listings, Features, real estate trends

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , September 10, 2020

With New York City’s listing inventory hitting its highest level in 14 years and net effective rents still falling, according to a new report by real estate appraisers at Miller Samuel, this may be the best time for renters to snag a good deal on an apartment. This week, we’re taking a look at the best rentals currently on the market for under $3,000/month. From a Brooklyn studio with outdoor space and on-site laundry to a bright corner one-bedroom on the Lower East Side, find out just how far $3,000 will get you in NYC right now.

Find your next place

Events, Greenwich Village

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , September 10, 2020

Photo by Steven Pisano via Flickr cc

Though the Village Halloween Parade was just a small neighborhood gathering in 1973, it has taken place and grown every year since then except after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. This year, however, the beloved event is being cancelled for the second time ever due to COVID-19. Jeanne Fleming, who has been the director of the parade since 1985, broke the news yesterday to the Post, but promised New Yorkers a special “trick” in its place, though she’s remaining mum on those details for now.

Read more

CityRealty, real estate trends

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , September 10, 2020

Photo by Loozrboy on Flickr

While some of Donald Trump’s family businesses have managed to profit from his presidency, his condo buildings in New York City continue to see significant price drops. According to a new report from CityRealty, owners of apartments at Trump-branded buildings in the city are “eager to get out,” even willing to take a significant loss on their properties. From 2016 to 2020, overall closing sales prices at nine Trump-branded condos dropped by 25 percent, according to CityRealty’s index tracking prices at Manhattan buildings owned by the Trump Organization.

Find out more

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Archtober2020