MORE TOP STORIES

Policy, Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 9, 2019

Via Flickr

A Brooklyn council member wants straphangers to ride the city’s transit system for free on a handful of major holidays. Council Member Justin Brannan, who represents the 43rd District, will introduce next week a non-binding resolution that requests the Metropolitan Transportation Authority offer free subway and bus rides during six holidays, as the New York Post first reported.

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Events, Midtown, Museums

  • By Nicole Mondrus
  • , August 9, 2019

Photo via Marion Curtis/Starpix for the Paley Center for Media

This Saturday, step back in time to 1950s New York City. The Emmy Award-winning comedy “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” is coming to life at the Paley Center for Media’s newest exhibit, “Making Mrs. Maisel.” From August 10th to September 6th, visitors can see the iconic costumes featured on the show, watch episodes from season two on the big screen, and even try their hand at stand-up comedy.

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hudson yards, Major Developments

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 9, 2019

Photo of Hudson Yards via Flickr

As Related Companies CEO Stephen Ross continues to face backlash for throwing a fundraiser on Friday for President Donald Trump, his company is dealing with some drama of its own. Plans submitted a year ago to the Long Island Rail Road for the second phase of the Hudson Yards development have still not been approved by the agency, the New York Post reported.

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affordable housing, Harlem, New Developments

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , August 9, 2019

Park Avenue between East 118th and East 119th Streets (top); image via East Harlem Neighborhood Plan.

The city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) on Thursday issued a request for proposals to develop two city-owned East Harlem sites. The new developments are to include 350 units of affordable housing as well as retail and cultural and community space. The RFPs are part of the East Harlem Housing Plan, which was created with community input received through the East Harlem Neighborhood Planning Process.

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Cool Listings, Murray Hill, New Developments

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , August 9, 2019

One of the city’s most architecturally significant projects to rise in recent years are the two copper-clad towers at 626 First Avenue in Murray Hill known as the American Copper Buildings. Designed by SHoP Architects and developed by JDS, the twisted towers boast a rare and distinctive feature: an amenity-filled sky bridge linking the two buildings more than 300 feet in the air. According to JDS, the three-story steel truss structure is Manhattan’s first new sky bridge in 80 years. There are only a handful of residences that boast private outdoor space right on the eye-catching sky bridge—and one of them is now on the rental market seeking $12,000 per month.

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Events, Transportation

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , August 9, 2019

Image via Flickr

The 37th annual Dominican Day Parade is set to hit Midtown this Sunday, August 11. Described as a “joyful celebration of all things Dominican” on the event website, the tradition started in 1982 as a small event series in Washington Heights but has since become a full-fledged citywide affair, with turnout reaching as high as half of a million people. The event takes place on the second Sunday of August every year, to commemorate the start of the Dominican Restoration War, or La Guerra de la Restauración, which began in 1863 and ended in 1865 with their victory over Spain.

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Architecture, Construction Update, Meatpacking District, New Developments, Starchitecture

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 8, 2019

Photo © Timothy Schenck

The Meatpacking District gained a new architectural landmark this week. Construction of Studio Gang’s 40 Tenth Avenue is officially complete, making it Jeanne Gang and her firm’s first New York City building. Nicknamed the Solar Carve Tower because the way its facade seems to have been “sculpted by the angles of the sun,” the 10-story, High Line-facing office tower is designed to allow for lots of sunlight without casting shadows on the neighboring green space.

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Featured Story

East Village, Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History, Lower East Side

Uncovering the stories behind downtown’s overlooked synagogues

By Andrew Berman of Village Preservation, Thu, August 8, 2019

  • By Andrew Berman of Village Preservation
  • , August 8, 2019

On August 8, 2008, Village Preservation and the East Village Community Coalition (EVCC) submitted a request to the LPC to landmark a little-known but remarkable survivor– Congregation Mezritch Synagogue at 515 East 6th Street between 1st Avenue and Avenue A.  The building was the last operating “tenement synagogue” in the East Village. A young, little-known developer named Jared Kushner was planning to tear it down and replace it with condos and a new space for the tiny congregation, which had operated out of the building since 1910.

The story has a (relatively) happy ending – the synagogue and much of its surroundings were landmarked in 2012, and the demolition plan was dropped. But unlike the deservedly beloved and celebrated Eldridge Street Synagogue, now a National Historic Landmark, Mezritch is one of several unique but in many cases overlooked historic synagogues still standing in and around Greenwich Village, the East Village, and the Lower East Side, which in the early 20th century contained what was by many accounts the largest Jewish community in the world. Ahead, we take a look at the history of seven of them and what makes them so unique.

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Celebrities, Nolita, Recent Sales

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , August 8, 2019

Supermodel Karlie Kloss and hubby Josh Kushner, investor and brother to Trump advisor/son-in-law Jared Kushner, have sold their downtown Manhattan newlywed nest at 211 Elizabeth Street for $6.6 million, the New York Post reports. The pair, who tied the knot last year, listed the 2,000-square-foot home with interiors by Roman and Williams and a 1,120-square-foot landscaped terrace, last February for $6.9 million.

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Policy, Transportation

NYC extends cap on Uber, Lyft for another year

By Devin Gannon, Thu, August 8, 2019

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , August 8, 2019

Via Flickr

The city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission voted on Wednesday to extend the cap on for-hire vehicle licenses for one year and reduce the time drivers can travel without passengers, the Wall Street Journal reported. The cap on licenses, the first of its kind in the country, was first introduced last year as part of a pilot program aimed at regulating the growing for-hire vehicle industry as well as reducing traffic and pollution.

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Lior Barak and Christine Blackburn PRESENT A THREE-PART SERIES

The Italian side of Williamsburg: History, famous joints, and today’s culture

  • By Michelle Cohen

Photo via Flickr cc

A bustling Brooklyn enclave that is today an impossibly trendy and diverse mix of glassy condos, hip new restaurants and storefronts, and unassuming multi-family homes in the northeast section of Williamsburg was one of New York City’s notable Italian-American neighborhoods for much of the 20th century. While it may not have the tourist cachet of Manhattan’s Little Italy–or the old-fashioned village-y coziness of Carroll Gardens–this swath of the ‘burg, bounded roughly by Montrose, Union, Richardson, and Humboldt Streets, was a little bit of Italy in its own right from the 1800s until as late as the 1990s. The north end of Graham Avenue was even christened Via Vespucci to commemorate the historic Italian-American community.

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