MORE TOP STORIES

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Upper West Side 

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , November 26, 2019

Photo credit: Denis Vlasov for Sotheby’s International Realty

This duplex at The Beresford at 211 Central Park West possesses one of Manhattan’s finest Central Park-facing terraces. The sprawling Upper West Side co-op in the celebrity-studded classic Emery Roth-designed pre-war building was home to Broadway and screen talent Adolph Green (he wrote “Singin’ In The Rain”) and Tony Award-winning actor Phyllis Newman. In addition to the sprawling duplex and 600-square-foot terrace, $24 million will assure you dazzling panoramic views of the Park, Central Park South, and the city skyline. And next door, you’ll find Jerry Seinfeld’s place.

Take the tour

Policy, Transportation

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , November 25, 2019

Photo by Joe Mabel on Flickr

After the U.S. Coast Guard halted service on nearly two dozen New York Waterway ferries for safety issues over the weekend, commuters on Monday faced extensive delays and modified routes. On Sunday, the Coast Guard said it suspended 23 of 32 ferries operated by the company after multiple inspections found them to be “operationally unfit.” As of Monday afternoon, 15 ferries remained out of service.

Get the details

Brooklyn Heights

  • By Dana Schulz
  • , November 25, 2019

All photos by Will Femia

Last month, Columbia Heights Associates unveiled renderings for a new “Welcome” sign that would replace the iconic “Watchtower” sign atop the building at 25-30 Columbia Heights in Downtown Brooklyn. The Jehovah’s Witnesses had operated their world headquarters here since 1969 but sold the building complex for $340 million in 2016. The new owners are transforming the site into Panorama, a five-building office complex that will also have retail and outdoor space. Their new sign is reminiscent of its predecessor, with 15-foot-tall bright red letters. This Wednesday, it will be officially lit on the 50th anniversary of the first lighting of the “Watchtower” sign.

But it might not be there for long

Events, holidays, maps

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , November 25, 2019

Map via Google Maps/Macy’s

It’s almost time for the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, and with 2.5 miles of public viewing areas along the route this year, anyone eager to claim a good spot should be able to with a little planning. This interactive map put together by the parade organizers outlines the stretches that have the best views as well as all the areas that will be restricted to the public. The map also notes where you can find essentials like restrooms, coffee, and food.

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Art, Flatiron, holidays

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , November 25, 2019

Photo by Cameron Blaylock

A bright and colorful public art installation has opened in front of the Flatiron Building just in time for the holiday season. Ziggy from New York-based firm Hou de Sousa was selected last week as the winner of the annual Flatiron Public Plaza Holiday Design Competition by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership and the Van Alen Institute. The structure is made up of painted rebar and 27,000 feet of iridescent cord and allows visitors to walk through, sit down, and peek through its vibrant openings. “Hou de Sousa’s spectacular installation invites us to rethink how we interact with public space, and with one another, “Deborah Marton, Van Alen’s executive director, said. “Their design creates delightful and unexpected ways to connect with others.”

See it here

condos, New Developments, Soho, Starchitecture

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , November 25, 2019

Photo by Adrian Gaut/Edge Reps (L); Photo by Joshua McHugh (R)

Known for his work on The New York Times Building, the Whitney Museum, and the Morgan Library expansion, Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano has completed his first residential building in NYC at 565 Broome Street. The Soho tower has 115 residences, ranging from studios to four-bedroom condos. Uber’s Travis Kalanick and tennis star Novak Djokovic have already scooped up units in the building, where sales launched last September.

More details

Midtown East, Urban Design

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , November 25, 2019

Rendering courtesy of Stantec

The creation of the East Midtown Greenway (EMG), a 1.5-acre public space stretching from East 53rd to 61st Streets along the waterfront, got underway Friday. The project, to be completed by 2022, is part of the Manhattan Waterfront Greenway initiative to wrap the entire perimeter of Manhattan with accessible public spaces and safe bicycle paths. The midtown space will close one of the largest remaining gaps in the $250 million city initiative, announced by Mayor de Blasio in 2018, to connect 32 miles of Manhattan waterfront esplanade.

Find out more

Featured Story

apartment living 101, Features, holidays, Shop

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , November 22, 2019

Photo by Kelsey Chance on Unsplash

Don’t let apartment life stop you from hosting! Forget the turkey and tradition, or start one of your own with a November (or December) dinner to remember. You can even tackle the classic Thanksgiving, or have a low-key, festive “Friendsgiving.” The key is to find your own collection of small-space, less-fuss entertaining ideas and go-to goods. Below, a few suggestions to get you started.

Ideas for a holiday feast, apartment-style, this way

Featured Story

Features, History

  • By Emily Nonko
  • , November 22, 2019

United Neighborhood Houses’ Rally for the Bury the Slums Campaign in 1936

Look back to early 1900s New York and you’ll find a city not only transformed by an influx of immigrants from around the world, but a movement to improve their living conditions. As newcomers to the city increasingly faced poverty, hunger, disease, crime and unsafe housing, community hubs like churches and synagogues began advocating for better living conditions. Settlement houses also played an important role in this movement for social justice. Their initial purpose of bringing more privileged, outside “settlers” into immigrant communities could be controversial, but it also forged bonds between different classes of New Yorkers who fought for issues like housing protections, stronger labor laws, and city sanitation efforts.

Exactly 100 years ago, an organization emerged to better coordinate the efforts of settlement houses and ensure their advocacy into the future. United Neighborhood Houses was the city’s first umbrella organization for settlement homes with the goal to fight for equality and social change. Today the organization exists as one of the largest human service systems in New York City, holding up the city’s still-robust collection of settlement houses. The history of United Neighborhood Houses tells a larger story of the evolving role of settlement houses in New York: why they were introduced, how they integrated — with some bumps — into impoverished communities, and how they’ve grown into community hubs still servicing New Yorkers today.

The full history ahead

affordable housing, Bronx, New Developments

  • By Alexandra Alexa
  • , November 22, 2019

Photo courtesy of L+M Development Partners

Following a ribbon-cutting ceremony yesterday, L+M Development Partners and Nelson Management Group opened the doors to their new mixed-use affordable housing developments in Soundview, the Bronx. The two buildings at 1520 and 1530 Story Avenue will bring 435 units of affordable housing and a 15,000-square-foot facility for Easterseals New York that will offer early childhood education. Roughly half of the units were up for grabs through a lottery held earlier this year.

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