All posts by Emily Nonko

Emily is a Brooklyn-based writer who has covered New York City real estate, architecture and design for Brownstoner, The Wall Street Journal, Dwell and other publications. You can follow her on Twitter @EmilyNonko.

Featured Story

building of the year, Features, Top Stories

VOTE for 6sqft’s 2019 Building of the Year

By Emily Nonko, Thu, December 5, 2019

If you had to boil it down, 2019 has been an important year for advancing the city’s most noteworthy residential projects. Perhaps no news was more important than the official opening of Hudson Yards, which introduced a collection of sleek towers to the Manhattan skyline. (Two Hudson Yards buildings, 15 and 35 Hudson Yards, have made this list.) But that still didn’t overshadow other glittering towers now transforming the skyline: the world’s tallest residential tower at Central Park Tower, the most expensive residential sale in the country at 220 Central Park South, and the highest infinity pool in the Western Hemisphere at Brooklyn Point. It’s been a year of construction progress, eye-popping sales prices, and exceptionally luxurious apartments and amenities behind unique facades.

Our picks are down to 12 of the most notable residential structures this year. Which do you think deserves 6sqft’s title of 2019 Building of the Year? To have your say, polls for our fifth annual competition will be open up until midnight on Friday, December 13th and we will announce the winner on Monday, December 16th.

Cast your vote!

Featured Story

Features, History

united neighborhood council, bury the slums, settlement house, settlement house history, settlement house rally

United Neighborhood Houses’ Rally for the Bury the Slums Campaign in 1936

Look back to early 1900s New York and you’ll find a city not only transformed by an influx of immigrants from around the world, but a movement to improve their living conditions. As newcomers to the city increasingly faced poverty, hunger, disease, crime and unsafe housing, community hubs like churches and synagogues began advocating for better living conditions. Settlement houses also played an important role in this movement for social justice. Their initial purpose of bringing more privileged, outside “settlers” into immigrant communities could be controversial, but it also forged bonds between different classes of New Yorkers who fought for issues like housing protections, stronger labor laws, and city sanitation efforts.

Exactly 100 years ago, an organization emerged to better coordinate the efforts of settlement houses and ensure their advocacy into the future. United Neighborhood Houses was the city’s first umbrella organization for settlement homes with the goal to fight for equality and social change. Today the organization exists as one of the largest human service systems in New York City, holding up the city’s still-robust collection of settlement houses. The history of United Neighborhood Houses tells a larger story of the evolving role of settlement houses in New York: why they were introduced, how they integrated — with some bumps — into impoverished communities, and how they’ve grown into community hubs still servicing New Yorkers today.

The full history ahead

Featured Story

Features, History, holidays, Manhattan

labor day, first labor day, labor day parade, new york city

An illustration of the first Labor Day parade, via Wiki Commons

Though Labor Day has been embraced as a national holiday–albeit one many Americans don’t know the history of–it originated right here in New York City. The holiday is a result of the city’s labor unions fighting for worker’s rights throughout the 1800s. The event was first observed, unofficially, on Tuesday, September 5th, 1882, with thousands marching from City Hall up to Union Square. At the time, the New York Times considered the event to be unremarkable. But 137 years later, we celebrate Labor Day on the first Monday of every September as a tribute to all American workers. It’s also a good opportunity to recognize the hard-won accomplishments of New York unions to secure a better workplace for us today.

Keep reading for the full history

Featured Story

City Living, Features, Interviews

Jake Dobkin was born in Park Slope 42 years ago, and over those years he’s never left New York City for longer than 10 weeks. In 2003, he co-founded the website Gothamist with Jen Chung, which emerged as a popular culture and entertainment blog about all things New York. In the summer of 2013, Dobkin decided to channel his native knowledge and newsroom snark with the column Ask a Native New Yorker. The first installment addressed a question to make any New Yorker shudder, “Is It Normal For Roaches To Crawl Through My Hair At Night?” Since then, he’s tackled everything from amusing annoyances of city life to more serious issues like homelessness, gentrification, and who deserves a seat on the subway.

Dobkin ultimately adapted “Ask A Native New Yorker” into a book, which was just released a few weeks ago. Titled Ask A Native New Yorker: Hard-Earned Advice on Surviving and Thriving in the Big City, it contains answers to 48 new questions on New Yorker’s minds including if public transit will be messed up forever and why we complain so much. 6sqft spoke with Dobkin on why he started writing the column, how it’s changed over the years, and what’s ahead with a new book and Gothamist under the new ownership of WNYC. He also shares the best place to find a peaceful spot in the middle of the city.

Read more

Featured Story

Behind the Scenes, Design, Features, Historic Homes, holidays, Interiors, yorkville

gracie mansion, gracie mansion holidays, Bryan Rafanelli

Photos courtesy of Roey Yohai Studio

Gracie Mansion, the residence of Mayor Bill de Blasio, is officially in full holiday spirit. The historic home, which dates back to 1799, is showing off decorations that promote some of the mayor’s top initiatives, plus the overall theme of togetherness. It’s all the work of New York City’s First Lady Chirlane McCray and renowned event planner Bryan Rafanelli, who have been refining the vision since this summer. This is Rafanelli’s second year working with McCray to decorate the people’s home of New York. For 2018, they selected jewel-toned colors, lots of ribbon, and even worked in some participation from New Yorkers.

Keep reading to figure out how the pair made it happen, an effort that includes bringing a 17-foot-tall tree through a narrow French door into the mansion’s ballroom. The images are sure to put you in a New York holiday spirit.

Read more

Featured Story

Book Reviews, Features, History, photography

“Bird’s-eye View of the Southern End of New York and Brooklyn, Showing the Projected Suspension–bridge over the East River from the Western Terminus in Printing-House Square,” drawn by Theodore Russell Davis (1870)

If you want to go on a visual journey that begins with Manhattan’s first European settlement, way back in the seventeenth century, up through the skyscrapers and urban planning of the late twentieth century, look no further than New York Rising: An Illustrated History from the Durst Collection. The book, set to come out on November 13th, originates from the sprawling Durst Collection at Columbia University’s Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library. Incredible photography captures the most definitive parts of New York history, accompanied by the thoughts of ten scholars who were asked to reflect on the images. Their writing ranges from the emergence of public transit to the “race for height” to affordable housing.

6sqft spoke with Thomas Mellins, who edited the book with Kate Ascher, on their efforts delving into the Durst Collection — which has its own unique history — to come up with this comprehensive visual history. See a selection of photos from the book, along with thoughts from Mellins, after the jump.

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maps, Urban Design

Domino Park, Two Trees

View from Domino Park, photo by Daniel Levin

Fresh off the news that the city will invest over $250 million to connect and green 32 miles of Manhattan waterfront, it’s become easier for New Yorkers to access the existing waterfront spaces open to the public. The Department of City Planning has just released the Waterfront Access Map, a tool to help you find one of the 200 open spaces situated along the city’s 520 miles of shoreline. It was released to mark the 25th anniversary of a 1993 zoning change that mandated public access to the city’s shoreline whenever a waterfront property is redeveloped.

Check out the map

Boerum Hill, Cool Listings

384 warren street, boerum hill, keller williams

This duplex condo up for sale at 384 Warren Street, in Boerum Hill, easily stands out with its beautiful living room fireplace. It’s a still-working, wood-burning brick fireplace that’s going to be perfectly cozy as winter approaches. Other than that, the apartment has a host of other perks. High ceilings make the pad feel spacious, a small deck offers a nice hang-out spot in warmer months, and a skylight brightens the space. It just sold last year for $830,000, and now it’s back on the market with a price bump to $900,000.

Take a tour

Long Island City

Yesterday the de Blasio Administration released the Long Island City Investment Strategy, an effort by the city to support sustainable growth in the waterfront neighborhood. Following an upzoning in 2001, the area has seen incredible transformation in the form of thousands of new apartments and waterfront towers. The city admits that the reason behind its strategy is such rapid development, which has strained neighborhood resources and the quality of life of residents.

$180 million is designated for the area, which is on top of $2.2 billion the city says its already invested over the years. “We are investing $180 million in Long Island City to address the needs of today while preparing for a more sustainable future.” Mayor de Blasio stated in a press release.

Where will the money go?

Featured Story

Features, History, Hotels, Upper West Side 

The Ansonia, Upper West Side history

The Ansonia in 1904, via Wiki Commons

With the 2018 World Series kicking off today, it’s amazing to think that one of the most iconic landmarks of the Upper West Side played a crucial role in shaping the outcome of the World Series back in 1919. Back then, the Ansonia was a brand new, luxury residential hotel in Manhattan–it opened in 1904 with a grand total of 1,400 rooms and 320 suites. The lavish locale quickly became popular amongst athletes; even Babe Ruth would stay there and come to treat the entire hotel like an extension of his apartment. But in 1919, baseball players and the mafia found a match in the hotel. A small group of players, and one very powerful, moneyed mafioso, came up with a deal that would throw the results of the game pitting the Chicago White Sox against the Cincinnati Reds.

Keep reading about the illicit deal

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