All posts by Emily Nonko

Emily is a Brooklyn-based writer who has covered New York City real estate, architecture and design for Brownstoner, The Wall Street Journal, Dwell and other publications. You can follow her on Twitter @EmilyNonko.

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Cool Listings, Gramercy Park, Interiors

224 east 18th street, duplex, sotheby's, gramercy park

Tin ceilings aren’t uncommon in prewar New York apartments, but they’re usually painted over white. This prewar garden duplex, at the Gramercy Park cooperative 224 East 18th Street, is featuring bold, silver ceilings on its main floor–an original design element of the 1920s townhouse. A more recent renovation transformed the apartment from a two bedroom into a one bedroom with a den/media room downstairs. There’s also access to a private backyard garden. The ask comes in at $1.55 million.

Check out both floors

Design, Interiors, Williamsburg

BFDO, Barker Freeman, East Williamsburg rowhouse

Yes, you heard that right–the architects characterized this East Williamsburg townhouse renovation as having “a mullet strategy” of a “business/historically correct approach in the front and a party/modern attitude toward the back.” The architects, BFDO, were tasked with restoring the facade of a historic wood frame house, while also modernizing and expanding it. The result? A pleasing blend of older historic details with a brightness and openness not often on display in a Brooklyn townhouse.

Check it out

Cool Listings, East Village, Interiors

175 east 2nd street, east village, rental, douglas elliman

Looking for a huge, dramatic living space right in the heart of the East Village? It’s right here, at 175 East 2nd Street, but it’ll cost a cool $10,000 a month. This one-bedroom condo now up for rent spans 1,450 square feet and comes with a 1,247-square-foot roof deck. That’s a ton of space, and all of it is dripping in unique, super trendy details: 11-foot ceilings with the original wooden ceiling beams, exposed brick, a fireplace and a long skylight over a renovated kitchen. Chic furniture and artwork fills all the open living space, and the apartment comes with the option to move into it furnished.

You’ll be tempted to move in

affordable housing, maps

New Yorkers know that taking on a mortgage in the city is no easy feat. But a recent map shows that, compared to the rest of the country, we’ll spend many more years than most everyone else (except San Franciscans) in our attempts to pay it off. This map, which measures “mortgage magnitude,” looked at the median local income and median local home value to show the relative affordability of property in each US county. The value of the average property was then expressed in the number of years salary it costs. In some counties, a house will only set you back a total of one year’s pay. But as you move out toward costal cities like New York, that number gets dramatically higher.

Here’s how many years New Yorkers should expect

Cool Listings, Interiors, Queens

3 Point Crescent, malba, nest seekers international, malba mansion

You’ll have to go all the way to the northernmost part of New York City to find a 12,000-square-foot mansion on a 16,000-square-foot lot. But here it is, at 3 Point Crescent in Malba, Queens. The sprawling seven-bedroom, nine-bathroom home has all sorts of interior flourishes–including plenty of mahogany–and the property comes with direct views of the Whitestone Bridge. There are lots of other perks too, like a seven car driveway, temperature controlled wine room, 40-foot pool and a wood-fired oven in the basement. The entire package is up for grabs at an ask of $8.795 million.

Take the very grand tour

Cool Listings, Design, Interiors, Park Slope

If there was a contest for most popular apartments in New York City, this one would be in the running as the winner. Apartment #3L at the Park Slope co-op 749 Union Street has been profiled in Lonny and Architectural Digest. It has its own Instagram account. And it was designed by Dan Mazzarini, the former director of store design at Ralph Lauren who went on to open his own design firm, BHDM. Envisioned as a black-and-white bachelor pad with a sleek, modern kitchen, the apartment is now looking for its next owner at an ask of $995,000.

Read more about the reno

Carroll Gardens, Design, Interiors

The Manhattan-based firm Loci Architecture took plenty of care in the renovation of this historic Carroll Gardens townhouse, which dates back to 1878. (According to the firm, the home was once occupied by the last queen of Sikkim, a northeastern state of India.) In a complete renovation and rear extension, Loci completely decked the interior out with wood–everything from salvaged pine, to Douglass Fir, to reclaimed barn timbers. Wood floors, ceiling beams, built ins, and storage space make for a warm, textural interior.

Now go see the finishes

Cool Listings, Getting Away, Historic Homes, More Top Stories, Upstate

Armour–Stiner House, Carmer Octagon House, westchester, irvington, sotheby's, Joseph Pell Lombardi,

The listing goes right ahead and calls this “one of the most visually unique homes in the world,” and it’d be hard to argue with that. This is known as the Armour–Stiner House, or the Carmer Octagon House, a unique octagon-shaped and domed Victorian style home located in Irvington, a town of Westchester County. It was built in 1860 by financier Paul J. Armour, enlarged between 1872 and 1876, and is now the only known residence constructed in the eight-sided, domed colonnaded shape of a classic Roman Temple. The current owner, Joseph Pell Lombardi, a preservation architect with his own firm, has listed it for rent asking a hefty $40,000 a month.

See the breathtaking interior

Cool Listings, Interiors, Tribeca

60 thomas street, tribeca, loft, tribeca loft, town residential

This Tribeca apartment will remind you of the artist lofts that once proliferated New York, but will also serve a jolt back to reality when it comes to the city’s ever-growing real estate prices. The full-floor pad at 60 Thomas Street sold in 2004 for $1.255 million, in 2007 for $1.795 million, and is now on the market asking $2.995 million. A keyed elevator entrance opens up to details like tin ceilings, a steel fire door, and exposed brick. The massive space also manages to fit four bedrooms, two full bathrooms, a media room, office, and full-sized laundry room.

Walk through the space

Bronx, History

Häagen-Dazs’ store in the Bronx, via Yelp

Despite its European-sounding name, Häagen-Dazs is actually born and bred right here in New York. In fact, there’s a fascinating history behind how the brand reached national success under a seemingly random title, picked by two immigrants from Poland. It all started in 1921, when the Polish Jewish couple Reuben and Rose Mattus emigrated to New York, according to Atlas Obscura. They worked for the family’s ice cream business, selling fruit ice and ice cream pops from a horse-drawn wagon in the busy streets of the Bronx. In the 1960s, Reuben and Rose struck out on their own, starting an ice cream company with three flavors: vanilla, chocolate, and coffee.

Here’s why they named it Häagen-Dazs

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