All posts by Emily Nonko

Emily is a Brooklyn-based writer who has covered New York City real estate, architecture and design for Brownstoner, The Wall Street Journal, Dwell and other publications. You can follow her on Twitter @EmilyNonko.

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Featured Story

Features, History, Hotels, Upper West Side 

The Ansonia, Upper West Side history

The Ansonia in 1904, via Wiki Commons

With the 2018 World Series kicking off today, it’s amazing to think that one of the most iconic landmarks of the Upper West Side played a crucial role in shaping the outcome of the World Series back in 1919. Back then, the Ansonia was a brand new, luxury residential hotel in Manhattan–it opened in 1904 with a grand total of 1,400 rooms and 320 suites. The lavish locale quickly became popular amongst athletes; even Babe Ruth would stay there and come to treat the entire hotel like an extension of his apartment. But in 1919, baseball players and the mafia found a match in the hotel. A small group of players, and one very powerful, moneyed mafioso, came up with a deal that would throw the results of the game pitting the Chicago White Sox against the Cincinnati Reds.

Keep reading about the illicit deal

Cool Listings, Interiors, Nolita

40 great jones street, condo, nolita

This Nolita loft is open, airy, and spans an impressive 1,800 square feet. The design is spot-on, too, complementing the lofty bones of the apartment that include vaulted, barrel ceilings and exposed brick. The building, 40 Great Jones Street, is believed to be built in the late 1800s. But everything here is thoroughly modern, from the flexible great room to the glass-panelled master bedroom.

Take a look inside

Brooklyn, real estate trends

According to Douglas Elliman’s latest market report, home prices in Brooklyn are higher than ever. The median and average sales prices for the borough both broke records, crossing the $800,000 and $1 million thresholds for the first time in the third quarter of this year. “As the Brooklyn market continues to reinvent itself over the past five years,” says the report, “There is no standard of comparison with historical trends.” It means Brooklyn, and also Queens, boast some of the fastest residential price growth in the country, with new developments cropping up and demand skyrocketing as buyers stream into outer boroughs.

Keep reading for stats

Featured Story

Features, Interviews, Museums, Transportation

Concetta Bencivenga, new york transit museum

Photo by Marc Hermann, courtesy of the New York Transit Museum

Concetta Anne Bencivenga wants you to visit the New York Transit Museum. After coming on as the museum’s director early last year — following Gabrielle Shubert’s impressive 24-year run — she’s become “cheerleader in chief,” in her own words, excited to promote the museum’s exhibits and programming to a wide range of New Yorkers.

With 6sqft she discusses how her diverse background brought her to the Transit Museum and what the past of New York’s public transportation can teach us about moving forward. She also talks about the revamp of an existing exhibit, the introduction of new ones, and her goals moving forward as director. Do you know why the MTA subway system is featured so prominently in early comic books? Keep reading, as Concetta shares the reasons why public transit is so crucial to New Yorkers lives — in both the obvious and more surprising ways.

Meet Concetta

Design, Gowanus

Courtesy of LIVWRK; Photo of Ingels via Wikimedia

Bjarke Ingels‘ architectural dominance of New York City is growing — the Danish starchitect has got his first commission in Brooklyn, reports Crain’s. Developer Aby Rosen tapped Ingels’ firm Bjarke Ingels Group to draft plans for a large new apartment project on the banks of the Gowanus Canal. The site in question — at 175-225 3rd Street, pictured in the aerial shot above — is currently a parking lot.

Read more details

Architecture, Construction Update, Major Developments, New Developments, Starchitecture, Upper West Side , Video

Via Field Condition

Construction is wrapping up on a trio of glassy residential towers known as Waterline Square, located on the five-acre waterfront site between West 59th and 61st Streets. Three Waterline Square, designed by Rafael Viñoly, got its multi-faceted crystal-planed exterior earlier this month. Richard Meier, on a leave of absence from his firm after accusations of sexual harassment, designed One Waterline Square, the 37-story building that also recently reached its pinnacle. Finally Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates‘ Two Waterline Square culminates at 38 stories. After the jump, check out a video showing the entire project rise in under 90 seconds.

Check it out

Featured Story

Features, History, holidays, Manhattan

labor day, first labor day, labor day parade, new york city

An illustration of the first Labor Day parade, via Wiki Commons

Though Labor Day has been embraced as a national holiday–albeit one many Americans don’t know the history of–it originated right here in New York City. The holiday is a result of the city’s labor unions fighting for worker’s rights throughout the 1800’s. The event was first observed, unofficially, on Tuesday, September 5th, 1882, with thousands marching from City Hall up to Union Square. At the time, the New York Times considered the event to be unremarkable. But 135 years later, we celebrate Labor Day on the first Monday of every September as a tribute to all American workers. It’s also a good opportunity to recognize the hard-won accomplishments of New York unions to secure a better workplace for us today.

Keep reading for the full history

Architecture, Events, Financial District

Dream Ship DestiNY, cunard building, 25 broadway, financial district, cunard ticketing hall

Photo courtesy of D.S. DestiNY

One of Lower Manhattan’s most stunning interiors is getting a moment in the spotlight, thanks to a Montreal-based multimedia company. The building in question is 25 Broadway, also known as the Cunard Building or Standard & Poors Building. The 1920s office was designed with an extravagant great hall for Cunard Line and Anchor Lines. The nautical-themed space, where cruise-goers would purchase tickets, became an interior landmark in 1995.

Moment Factory, a multimedia company known for creating immersive environments, felt the hall would be the perfect place to debut its work in New York City. The design team studied just about every inch of the elaborate room, boasting murals, domed ceilings and marble work, to transform it for visitors while remaining true to the original architecture. The result, as the company puts it, is a “massive 360-degree digital canvas, enveloping its audience in light, color and sound.” 6sqft got a sneak peek of this unique show, which brings you aboard a classic ocean liner and reveals the hall in all its glory by the end of the show.

Check out the incredible space

Featured Story

Brooklyn, Features, History

Battle of Long Island, 1858 by Alonzo Chappel

242 years ago on August 27th, less than two months after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, the largest battle of the Revolutionary War played out across Brooklyn. What was first known as the Battle of Long Island (Brooklyn was still just a small town at the time of the attack) was later dubbed the Battle of Brooklyn. On this summer day in 1776, The British took their troops from Staten Island to stealthily attack George Washington and his Continental Army at their Brooklyn camp. Greatly outnumbered in size and skill, Washington sent many of his soldiers on an escape route through Brooklyn Heights and across the foggy East River to Manhattan. To distract the British and buy the rest of the troops time, Washington also sent the entire 1st Maryland Regiment, known as the Maryland 400, on a suicide mission. All 400 soldiers from the regiment were killed in battle with the British, but the Continental Army made its escape and went on to win the war.

Not surprising since these harrowing events played out across a good portion of the borough, there are monuments, a museum, and plaques to commemorate it. And then there are popular Brooklyn locales—from Prospect Park to Green-Wood Cemetery—that you might not realize were former battlefields. After the jump, 6sqft rounds up the modern-day locations once crucial to the Battle of Brooklyn, with some tips on how to commemorate the event this weekend.

Keep reading

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Upstate

116 Premium Point, All View, Westchester, Halstead, waterfront mansion,

Prepare to be stunned by this waterfront mansion that’s just hit the market within commuting distance of New York City. The 35-room Westchester estate, appropriately named “All View” by its original 19th-century owner, sits grandly atop a three-acre peninsula jutting out into the Long Island Sound. The grounds (conceived of by Central Park and Prospect Park designer Frederick Law Olmsted) do not disappoint; neither does the house, which is full of historic details but has also received modern — and a few whimsical — renovations. It now boasts 13 bedrooms, nine wood-burning fireplaces, three kitchens, and a new geothermal heat and air conditioning system. The best part? Every single room offers a view of the water.

You have to see inside

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