affordable housing

affordable housing, Hell's Kitchen

midtown, affordable housing, 806 9th Avenue, 705 10th Avenue.

Rendering of the new development at 705 10th Avenue. Image credit: CetraRuddy

The New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) announced Wednesday that it will build approximately 260 units of affordable housing on two vacant city-owned sites in the Clinton/Hell’s Kitchen section of Midtown Manhattan, one at 806 9th Avenue and another located at 705 10th Avenue. According to a press release, HPD has selected two development teams who will partner with nonprofits to bring an array of services to the surrounding community.

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affordable housing, housing lotteries, yorkville

Rendering via Curtis + Ginsberg

At the corner of Second Avenue and 92nd Street, just a few short blocks from the Second Avenue Subway, Extell Development has completed their first all-affordable housing project. Located at 1768 Second Avenue and designed by Curtis + Ginsberg, the development is comprised of two separate buildings, one 11 stories and the other six stories, for a combined 28 units of below-market-rate housing. These units are reserved for households earning 70 or 80 percent of the area median income, ranging from $1,018/month studios to $1,740/month three-bedrooms.

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affordable housing, New Jersey, Policy

homeless nyc, nyc homeless shelters

Photo via Wikimedia

In a statement this week, Newark Mayor Ras J. Baraka asked that New York City’s Special One-Time Assistance (SOTA) Program providing homeless shelter residents with free rent for a year if they are willing to leave NYC be re-evaluated due to “serious defects.” A recent investigation by WNYC confirmed that some families ended up in “illegal and uninhabitable” apartments in Newark. As CBS New York reports, Baraka cited the fact that participants were coming to Newark under the program–which pays landlords a year’s worth of rent upfront–and ending up in the aforementioned conditions, then being abandoned to become homeless again when the year was up.

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affordable housing, Flatbush, housing lotteries

Photo via CityRealty

The next culprit in a long list of the city’s non-affordable “affordable” housing lotteries is an opportunity for “middle-income” New Yorkers to apply for 28 units at East Flatbush’s new rental Ensemble. It’s available to New Yorkers earning 130 percent of the median income, which begs the question: Is a single person earning $95,000 a year really in need of subsidized housing? But the most questionable part of this lottery is that it’s offering “six months free rent on the last six months of one and two-year leases.” Rental concessions like this are typically reserved for market-rate buildings that are having trouble leasing or need to attract tenants in a slow market. But since these affordable rents are minimally lower than the market-rate, maybe it’s operating as such.

Is $2,600/month affordable?

affordable housing, gentrification, maps, Policy

City sees an unprecedented 37 percent drop in evictions

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, February 5, 2019

The mayor’s office announced this week that New York City’s residential evictions by marshals had declined by 37 percent since 2013, with approximately 18,000 evictions in 2018 compared to almost 29,000 evictions in 2013. In Manhattan, evictions are down 47 percent since 2013. What that means: Since 2013, more than 100,000 New Yorkers who might otherwise have faced evictions have been able to stay in their homes. And evictions decreased 14 percent in 2018 alone. Maps from the New York City Council show data on where the most evictions happen and allow you to search for a specific address in any borough to find out more.

Universal Access to legal aid, maps and more

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

A rendering of 988 East 180th Street, courtesy of the office of Ritchie Torres

It’s been over two years since work got underway to demolish 14 building at the Bronx’s 1970s-era Lambert Houses and replace them with taller towers that will hold 1,665 affordable apartments. In addition to doubling the site’s number of affordable units, the $600 million project will have a public school and three times the amount of retail space. Though the entire overhaul won’t be complete for another 11-12 years, applications are now being accepted for the first new residential building (h/t Welcome2TheBronx). The 49 below-market-rate residences are reserved for those earning 60 or 100 percent of the area median income and range from $761/month studios to $1,600/month two-bedrooms.

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affordable housing, Design

830 Freeman Street, Big Ideas for Small Lots, NYC HPD

The city hopes to develop affordable housing on this lot at 829 Freeman Street in the Bronx; via Google Street View

The city is calling on architects to help design innovative affordable housing on irregularly-shaped lots, the New York Times reported Monday. The Department of Housing Preservation and Development will launch a design competition, along with the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, seeking ideas for housing on 23 unusually small or narrow lots across the city. The program, called Big Ideas for Small Lots NYC, was first announced by the city last year and falls under Mayor Bill de Blasio’s ambitious Housing New York 2.0 plan.

More details this way

affordable housing, Policy

Federal government increases oversight of NYCHA

By Devin Gannon, Thu, January 31, 2019

queensbridge houses, nycha, public housing nyc

Via Wikimedia

President Donald Trump’s administration announced on Thursday it will seize some control over the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), calling for an independent federal monitor to oversee the troubled agency. According to the New York Times, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), NYCHA, and the city reached a deal that includes an investment of $2.2 billion over 10 years by the city in NYCHA, but does not place the agency under receivership. The monitor will be responsible for oversight of the agency’s 176,000 apartments, part of the largest public housing authority in the country.

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affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

The Parkchester Oval, via Wiki Commons

Last week, it was announced that the Parkchester section of the Bronx, served only by the 6 train, would be receiving a new Metro-North station, connecting it to Penn Station. And for those New Yorkers who qualify for the city’s newest affordable housing lottery–earning 40, 60, or 100 percent of the area median income–there’s a chance to get into the neighborhood on the heels of this news. There are 174 mixed-income apartments up for grabs at the new, two-building development Westchester Mews, and they range from $462/month studios to $1,888/month three-bedrooms.

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affordable housing, Brooklyn Heights, housing lotteries

Rendering courtesy of The Pierrepont

When it comes to the city’s affordable housing lotteries, many of the same neighborhoods seem to pop up over and over again, so it’s always refreshing to see a new area come online, like this opportunity for 23 units in Brooklyn Heights. Available to New Yorkers earning 40, 60, or 130 percent of the area median income, the apartments are located at The Pierrepont, a recently completed luxury rental designed by local favorite Marvel Architects. The affordable units range from $596/month studios to $2,993/month two-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

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