affordable housing

affordable housing, Bronx, New Developments

1520 Story Avenue, 1530 Story Avenue, Bronx, Soundview, Affordable Housing, L+M Development Partners

Photo courtesy of L+M Development Partners

Following a ribbon-cutting ceremony yesterday, L+M Development Partners and Nelson Management Group opened the doors to their new mixed-use affordable housing developments in Soundview, the Bronx. The two buildings at 1520 and 1530 Story Avenue will bring 435 units of affordable housing and a 15,000-square-foot facility for Easterseals New York that will offer early childhood education. Roughly half of the units were up for grabs through a lottery held earlier this year.

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affordable housing, East Village, housing lotteries

Street View of 433 East 13th Street in June 2019; Map Data © 2019 Google

It’s your chance to snag an affordable apartment in a prime section of the East Village. A lottery launched this week for 30 mixed-income units at a newly constructed building called EVE NYC, located at 433 East 13th Street between 1st Avenue and Avenue A. Not only is the building within walking distance of an abundance of restaurants and bars, but it also offers one of the best perks inside of it: a Trader Joe’s will open on the ground floor of its 14th Street side. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 40, 60, and 130 percent of the area median income can apply for the units, which range from $674/month studios to $2,991/month two-bedrooms.

Do you qualify?

affordable housing, Bronx, Major Developments

Renderings courtesy of ArX Solutions

Last fall, Brookfield Properties bought two sites in Mott Haven for $165 million—the most expensive transaction on record for development in the Bronx—from Somerset Partners and Chetrit Group. On Thursday, the developers revealed a $950 million plan for a 4.3-acre mixed-use development that will bring more than 1,350 apartments to the South Bronx neighborhood, of which 30 percent will be affordable. Branded as Bankside, the project will also include a public waterfront park and promenade, as well as ground-floor retail and community facility spaces.

See it here

affordable housing, Noho, Policy, real estate trends, Soho

storefront vacancy, DCP, storefront vacancy study

Image: Steven Pisano via Flickr.

The Department of City Planning (DCP), along with Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer and Council Member Margaret Chin, released on Wednesday the Envision Soho/Noho report, a comprehensive summary of findings and recommendations that address issues and guide future plans for downtown Manhattan’s Soho and Noho neighborhoods. The report represents the result of a six-month-long community engagement series on the two historic neighborhoods, aimed at addressing their unique challenges in the 21st century. Contained in the report is a detailed summary of the engagement process that presents the perspectives of participants, as well as recommendations for guiding future plans for improving quality of life, addressing housing concerns, and supporting the unique mixed-use character of these neighborhoods.

More from the report, this way

affordable housing, Policy

NYC skyline

Image by Nick Normal via Flickr

In 2017, the de Blasio administration announced a five-year “Turning the Tide on Homelessness” plan to convert hundreds of cluster apartments, occupied by homeless families across the city, into permanently affordable units. Earlier this year, the City was able to complete the first phase of that plan by financing not-for-profit developers to acquire 17 buildings, rehabilitate them, and turn them into permanent affordable housing. Now the administration is moving forward with a second phase that will convert 14 more “cluster site” buildings. The first phase created housing for roughly 450 homeless families and the second phase is expected to aid another 200 families.

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affordable housing, Architecture, New Developments, Rockaway

Edgemere Commons, Edgemere Queens, Aufgang Architects, Arker Companies

All renderings by Aufgang Architects

The City Council voted yesterday to give the go-ahead to the Arker Companies’ massive redevelopment of the former Peninsula Hospital site in Far Rockaway. Named Edgemere Commons, the 11-building project in the Edgemere neighborhood will include 2,050 units of affordable housing, the largest such project by a private developer under the de Blasio administration. It will also have commercial, community facility, and retail space, including a new supermarket, as well as a playground and a public plaza (rendering also show, of course, a food hall). After 104 years, the hospital closed in 2012 due mainly to financial troubles. The Edgemere Commons project hopes to “reactivate the site” and “spur economic growth in Far Rockaway,” according to a press release.

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affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

Google Street View of the houses across the street from 735 Cauldwell Avenue, Map data © 2019 Google

In the Melrose section of the South Bronx, a new building is now accepting applications for 161 affordable apartments. Located at 735 Cauldwell Avenue, just a couple blocks from the 2 and 5 trains at Jackson Avenue, the building has a part-time attended lobby, roof deck, fitness center, party room, and laundry. The units are available to households earning 30, 50, or 100 percent of the area median income and range from $331/month studios to $1,910/month three-bedrooms.

See if you qualify

affordable housing, Bronx

Rendering by Peter L. Woll Architect, P.C; Courtesy of Community Access

An affordable housing complex with health and wellness perks officially opened in the South Bronx on Tuesday, after breaking ground more than two years ago. The $52 million building at 111 East 172nd Street in the neighborhood of Mount Eden contains 126 apartments, with 60 of them set aside for those living with mental illness. The units are affordable for households earning 60 percent of the area median income.

More here

affordable housing, Chelsea, Policy

NYCHA, airbnb

Queensbridge Houses. Photo credit: Metro Centric via Wikimedia Commons

The New York Times recently told of a pair of visitors from Boston who signed up for a sweet Airbnb deal on a Chelsea pad for $90 a night–and were surprised to have it turn out to be a seventh-floor unit in the neighborhood’s 11-building NYCHA Fulton Houses complex. The would-be guests noticed that “something seemed off,” starting with the roach trap next to the bed. The travelers tipped off the company, who refunded their money, and their story quickly became internet history as yet another way homestay platforms are being taken advantage of and another log on the fire of the debate that rages over what to do about it.

Airb-n-beware?

affordable housing, hudson yards, Lower East Side, Major Developments

Is Essex Crossing the ‘anti-Hudson Yards’?

By Michelle Cohen, Thu, November 7, 2019

Rendering of Essex Crossing via Moso Studio

The New York Times recently suggested that the boxy, ordinary-looking Essex Crossing, with its Trader Joe’s, Target, movieplex, historic Essex Street Market and subsidized affordable housing was the “anti-Hudson Yards,” a convincing foil to the buzzy midtown tourist magnet. The obvious contrast between the glittering far-west-side megaproject that in the right light resembles Dubai on the Hudson and the six-acre $1.9 billion development abutting the Williamsburg Bridge speaks to each one’s intended audience, of course. But a diversity of options for both locals and visitors and a broad offering of affordable housing could make Essex Crossing more than just Liverpool on the Lower East Side.

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