affordable housing

affordable housing, Manhattan, Policy

One world trade center, skyscrapers, tall towers, supertalls

Via Flickr

In June, the state’s Court of Appeals found that apartments at two Lower Manhattan buildings had been unlawfully deregulated by landlords who had collected millions of dollars in benefits under a 1995 tax program. Now, as The City reports, thousands of former or current tenants in the area may be owed up to six years in back rent from landlords who received the tax breaks for years.

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affordable housing, Harlem, New Developments

East Harlem redevelopment, HPD, east harlem housing plan, east harlem, new developments, affordable housing

Park Avenue between East 118th and East 119th Streets (top); image via East Harlem Neighborhood Plan.

The city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) on Thursday issued a request for proposals to develop two city-owned East Harlem sites. The new developments are to include 350 units of affordable housing as well as retail and cultural and community space. The RFPs are part of the East Harlem Housing Plan, which was created with community input received through the East Harlem Neighborhood Planning Process.

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affordable housing, Manhattan, Policy

The River Crossing building in Harlem; Photo by CTC Creative

A group of real estate investors is buying 2,800 New York City rental apartments for $1.2 billion. But instead of keeping with the industry’s custom of converting affordable units into market-rate homes, L+M Development Partners and its partner Invesco Real Estate plan on returning a chunk of those units to long-term regulation. The venture involves the purchase of five former Mitchell-Lama buildings in Manhattan, with four in Harlem and one on Roosevelt Island.

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affordable housing, Chelsea, Green Design, housing lotteries, Uncategorized

211 West 29th Street, affordable housing, lotteries, chelsea

Rendering via ZH Architects

As Cityrealty reported, construction topped out at Flow Chelsea at 211 West 29th Street last fall; the 24-story building’s distinguished stone facade and framed windows are all the way up, and as work winds down, an affordable lottery has been announced for 17 of the building’s 55 units. Individuals and households earning 70 to 130 percent of the area median income are eligible to apply for studio through three-bedroom apartments with rents that range from $1,169/month for studios to $3,051/month for a two-bedroom. As Chelsea‘s median rent ranges from $3,112/month for studios to $7,295/month for two-bedrooms (figures per CityRealty listings), this is quite a deal.

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affordable housing, Policy

Via Creative Commons

New York City added a record number of supportive housing units and affordable homes for homeless New Yorkers and seniors this fiscal year, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Tuesday. While the total number of affordable units preserved or created is down to 25,299 this fiscal year from last year’s 32,444, the city said it still expects to meet the mayor’s goal of creating 300,000 affordable homes by 2026.

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affordable housing, Harlem, Museums, New Developments

Rendering courtesy of Empire State Development

New York’s first civil rights museum will soon land in Harlem, as the city pushes forward with a new $260 million development near the Adam Clayton Powell office building on 125th Street. Empire State Development is planning a 17-story mixed-use building that, in addition to the museum, will house the headquarters of civil rights nonprofit National Urban League (which was founded in the neighborhood in 1910 and currently has offices downtown), office space (including below-market-rate for Harlem-based nonprofits), retail, and 170 affordable apartments targeted to New Yorkers making 30-80 percent of the area median income.

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affordable housing, Bronx, Major Developments, New Developments

the peninsula, bronx affordable housing, gilbane development company, spofford juvenile center, hunts point,

Rendering courtesy of WXY Architecture + Urban Design and Body Lawson Associates

The first phase of a project that will bring more than 700 units of affordable housing to the Bronx neighborhood of Hunts Point will get underway in the coming weeks, developers announced Tuesday. Dubbed the Peninsula, the mixed-use complex will rise on the site of the former Spofford Juvenile Detention Center, which closed in 2011 after the city recognized its awful conditions and treatment of children. The first phase, costing about $121.5 million, includes the construction of 183 affordable units by 2021.

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affordable housing, Policy

queensbridge houses, nycha, public housing nyc

Via Wikimedia

Independent federal monitoring of the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) began this year, and the first resulting quarterly analysis is expected to be released as early as Monday, POLITICO reports. The quarterly analysis will provide a summary of progress made to date in addressing issues that have long plagued the public housing authority such as lead paint, mold, broken heating systems and shabby kitchens and bathrooms. According to sources familiar with its content, the report also contains the unexpected suggestion of using drones to inspect building rooftops and facades.

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affordable housing, Policy

Via Creative Commons

A group of real estate groups and individual property owners filed a lawsuit Monday, challenging newly passed laws that strengthen rent and tenant protections in New York City. Last month, Democratic officials in Albany passed a landmark package of bills that close loopholes that have allowed landlords to increase rents and deregulate stabilized apartments. The lawsuit, filed by the Rent Stabilization Association (RSA), the Community Housing Improvement Program (CHIP), and seven individual property owners, claims that the laws, as well as the entire rent regulation system, violate the 14th and Fifth Amendments of the U.S. Constitution, as reported by The Real Deal.

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affordable housing, City Living, Policy

NYC affordable housing

Image via Wiki Commons

Following years of efforts to keep a report about segregation in the city’s affordable housing lottery system under wraps, a federal court ruling finally led to the report’s release on Monday. As the New York Times first reported, the findings, written by Queens College sociology professor Andrew A. Beveridge, found unequivocal racial disparities at every stage of the process and in every community district where a majority of residents are of one race or ethnicity.

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