All posts by Aaron Ginsburg

Brooklyn, City Living, Queens, Transportation

Image courtesy of Gov. Kathy Hochul’s Office

A public transportation project that could ease the lives of thousands of New Yorkers is gaining momentum. Gov. Kathy Hochul on Thursday announced the completion of a feasibility study for the Interborough Express, moving the project into its next phase of development. The feasibility study yielded promising results, revealing that the new line could serve anywhere between 74,000 and 88,000 riders a day while connecting to 17 subway stops and the Long Island Rail Road. From its start in Bay Ridge to its final stop in Jackson Heights, the route would take 40 minutes.

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City Living, Transportation

Image courtesy of the Trust for Governors Island

The city’s Economic Development and the Trust For Governors Island on Thursday announced that daily, year-round ferry service to Governors Island will begin on Monday, January 24. The NYC Ferry will add a stop at Yankee Pier on its South Brooklyn Route between Red Hook and Sunset Park, connecting New Yorkers to the island from the Lower East Side and Brooklyn. The new service’s hours will coincide with the Island’s new winter hours, open 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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affordable housing, housing lotteries, Long Island City, Queens

Rendering courtesy of the NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development

A housing lottery opened this week for 31 middle-income units in a brand new luxury building in Long Island City. Designed by Fogarty Finger Architects, Rise LIC is a 10-story residential building offering its residents spacious units with extensive amenities. New Yorkers earning 80 and 130 percent of the area median income can apply for the apartments, which range from $1,486/month studios to $3,200/month three bedrooms.

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Greenpoint, History, Museums

Image courtesy of Gregg Richards

The first-ever Lenape-curated exhibition in New York is coming to Brooklyn. Presented by the Brooklyn Public Library and The Lenape Center, Lenapehoking features a collection of masterworks by Lenape artists and educational programs that teach visitors the story of the Lenape community. The collection is curated by Joe Baker, the co-founder and executive director of the Lenape Center and enrolled member of the Delaware Tribe of Indians. The exhibition opens on Thursday, January 20 at the Greenpoint Library and Environmental Education Center and runs through April 30.

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affordable housing, Brooklyn, Downtown Brooklyn, Fort Greene, housing lotteries

Rendering courtesy of RXR

A housing lottery launched this week for 143 middle-income units in a new building in Downtown Brooklyn. Designed by Perkins Eastman, The Willoughby is a 34-story mixed-use residential tower offering prospective tenants the opportunity to save money in the long term with rent-stabilized units. New Yorkers earning 130 percent of the area median income are eligible to apply for the apartments, which range from $2,523/month studios to $3,235/month for two bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

Bronx, Policy

Image courtesy of Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office on Flickr

After the fire that claimed 17 lives at a Bronx apartment building last week, elected officials are brainstorming strategies to prevent future tragedies. Rep. Ritchie Torres and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand on Monday announced new legislation requiring the installation of heat sensors at federally-owned housing developments. Supported by Mayor Eric Adams, sensors monitor the heat levels within buildings, alerting authorities when they reach unsafe conditions. The monitors can also keep track of when temperatures drop lower than the legal limit.

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History, Museums

Left: Carte-de-visite of Frederick Douglass, late 19th century. Patricia D. Klingenstein Library, New-York Historical Society. Right: Douglass scrapbook, Beinecke Library, New-York Historical Society

The work of one of America’s most influential advocates for liberty and equality will be on view in New York City this Black History Month. On February 11, the New-York Historical Society will open Our Composite Nation: Frederick Douglass’ America, a special installation that honors the legacy of one of America’s most prolific freedom fighters. Named after one of Frederick Douglass’ most iconic speeches written at the end of the Civil War, the installation aims to paint a picture of Douglass’ optimistic vision of a new America during the era of Reconstruction.

Details here

Cool Listings, Upper East Side

All images courtesy of DBOX

Here’s an opportunity to live in a new residential building designed by famed architect Robert A.M. Stern. Located on the Upper East Side, 200 East 83rd Street is a 35-story tower with a jaw-dropping amenity package (like a 17th-floor pool room with Central Park views). A spacious one-bedroom apartment at the building is up for sale, priced at $2,050,000. Developed by Naftali Group and the Rockefeller Group, the condo building made headlines last November when a six-room penthouse sold for a record-breaking $27 million.

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Featured Story

City Living, Features

10 places to volunteer in New York City this winter

By Aaron Ginsburg, Fri, January 14, 2022

Photo by Joel Muniz on Unsplash

As the pandemic rages on, New Yorkers have maintained their resilience. However, many who were already struggling have had an even rougher time, with thousands of New Yorkers facing hunger, homelessness, and unemployment. As the federal holiday celebrating Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., approaches, consider taking action and assisting the less fortunate in your community. Ahead, find a number of New York City organizations seeking volunteers this winter. Note, many of the organizations listed have put safety protocols in place to prevent the spread of the virus, including masks and social distancing.

Full list here

Policy

Image courtesy of Billie Grace Ward on Flickr

Temporary sidewalk sheds are legally required to be installed at any construction site to protect pedestrians from falling debris. While they are seen as a safety necessity, the structures are eyesores that block sunlight and slow foot traffic. In New York City, the total number of sidewalk sheds has tripled over the past two decades, a new report released this week by the Independent Budget Office found. Looking at data from the Department of Buildings, the report found Manhattan was home to the most sidewalk sheds but noted the outer boroughs are starting to catch up.

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