All posts by Michelle Cohen

Michelle is a New York-based writer and content strategist who has worked extensively with lifestyle brands like Seventeen, Country Living, Harper’s Bazaar and iVillage. In addition to being a copywriter for a digital media agency she writes about culture, New York City neighborhoods, real estate, style, design and technology among other topics. She has lived in a number of major US cities on both coasts and in between and loves all things relating to urbanism and culture.

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Events, History, Upper West Side 

Lou reed, new york public library, nypl

Image courtesy of NYPL.

The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, located in Lincoln Center, has just announced that the Lou Reed Archive is open to the public. The archive documents the life and history of the musician, composer, poet, writer, photographer and tai-chi student through his own extensive collection of papers, photographs, recordings and other materials that span Reed’s creative life starting with his 1958 Freeport High School band, the Shades, right up to his last performances in 2013. In addition, the archive’s opening is being celebrated with a special edition library card as well as a display of items in the collection and more events.

Find out more

History, Landmarks Preservation Commission, New Developments, Tribeca

new york life insurance building, 346 broadway, clocktower building, 108 leonard

Image: Wikimedia Commons.

Developers had big plans for the luxury condominiums they were creating at the block-long former site of the New York Life Insurance Company at 346 Broadway (also known as 108 Leonard Street) since purchasing it from the city in 2014. The new residential project would hold 140 units starting at $1.5 million, capped by a stunning penthouse that would be priced at over $20 million. The one snag in this golden opportunity: The building’s iconic Clock Tower–sometimes called New York’s ‘Big Ben,’ which sits atop the building and was designated an interior landmark in 1987: The clock must be wound by hand, a process which requires access through, as the New York Times reports, the future penthouse. A case against the developers’ plan and a subsequent appeal were both won by the opponents, saying the LPC couldn’t unwind the clock’s landmark status–but an appeal in the state’s highest court, the Court of Appeals, is still pending.

Find out more

Chelsea, Technology

food labs, wework, the we company, food

A rendering of the WeWork Food Labs space. Image courtesy of WeWork.

Coworking, office space leasing (and everything else) company WeWork has launched its second “innovation lab.” WeWork Food Labs intends to nurture early-stage startups focused on the future of food. Food Labs will offer dedicated space, community, and programming to entrepreneurs who are tackling challenges in food-related industries from hospitality, consumer goods and kitchen appliances to supply chain management, agricultural technology, distribution software, robotics and more, all of which are apparently very much in need of innovation. A flagship New York City location will open in late 2019 at 511 West 25th Street adjacent to the High Line in West Chelsea.

Find out more

Art, Events, More Top Stories

stephen mallon, sea train, artificial reef, events, photography

Air Break, 2008. Photo by Stephen Mallon.

By now you may have seen Stephen Mallon’s mind-bending photo series showing thousands of decommissioned NYC subway cars being tossed into the Atlantic Ocean. The MTA initiative was undertaken more than 10 years ago with the goal of creating artificial reefs that would support sea life along the eastern seabed. The amazing photo series, briefly on view at NYU’s Kimmel Galleries, documented the train cars being heaved into the briny deep from Delaware to South Carolina over three years. Now, a new exhibit, “Sea Train: Subway Reef Photos by Stephen Mallon,” opening March 20th at the New York Transit Museum’s Grand Central Gallery, features 19 large-format photographs that capture the iconic subway cars, dropped like toy trains from hulking barges as they’re being deployed as sea-life-sustaining artificial reefs,

More amazing photos and their story, this way

Cool Listings, Interiors, Upper East Side

205 East 69th Street, co-ops, cool listings, David Wolkowsky, penthouses

This two-bedroom penthouse at 205 East 69th Street in the Upper East Side certainly has no dark side: The apartment’s walls are lined with pre-war Deco-style casement windows and doors, just outside which you’ll find spacious wrap-around terraces in every direction. Asking $3,295,000, this uptown oasis has cultural bragging rights as well: It was the New York City home of developer, preservationist and visionary David Wolkowsky, who is considered to be the most important transformational influence in modern-day Key West, Fla., and credited with creating the island’s reputation as a quirky bohemian oasis and tourist destination. Wolkowsky, who was known as “Mr. Key West,” passed away last year at the age of 99.

See what’s outside all those fabulous windows

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

1530 Story Avenue, Soundview, affordable housing

Rendering via L+M Development

A housing lottery has just launched for 223 mixed-income apartments in the new South Bronx building located at 1520 Story Avenue, known as Story Avenue West. The rental building is one of two new structures at the site, part of the Lafayette-Boynton residential complex in the Soundview neighborhood, developed by Nelson Management Group and L+M Development Partners. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 30, 50, 60, 90 and 110 percent of the area median income can apply for the units, which range from $389/month studios to $2,066/month three-bedrooms.

Find out how to apply

Celebrities, Recent Sales, West Village 

Listing photos by Chris Riccio, courtesy of the Corcoran Group

The carriage house at 23 Cornelia Street in the West Village that Taylor Swift called home while her sprawling Franklin Street property was being renovated has sold for $11.5 million after several years on the market and a price chop of half its original ask of $24.5M, the New York Post reports. The pop star’s hefty $39,500 monthly rent sounds a little more understandable when you’ve seen the private pool, garage and rooftop terrace with city views.

Take a last look

Art, Bronx, Events

It's the bronx, ITB, Union Crossing, the bronx, festivals, round seven, events

The creators of The Bronx Night Market will soon be launching a grand festival dedicated to “celebrating Bronx hustle.” The It’s the Bronx (@itsthebronx) festival will take place on March 22-24 at the Union Crossing building in Port Morris, featuring up-and-coming musicians, visual artists, discussion panels, video screening, a gallery exhibit and street performances plus plenty to eat and drink.

Find out more

hudson yards, Major Developments, New Developments

Rendering of the observation deck at 30 Hudson Yards, via Related Companies

The soon-to-open Hudson Yards, the 28-acre development that’s being called the largest private development in the U.S, is not only situated on the Hudson River, but what could pass for a small city could easily be seen as a target for terrorists with its million-square-foot retail center and dining district, the 1,296-foot-tall 30 Hudson Yards, the city’s most expensive office building (50 Hudson Yards) and thousands of pricey apartments. The Wall Street Journal reports that the $25 billion project from Related Companies and Oxford Properties Group claims to be fortress-like in its protection against the wrath of both nature and humankind.

What’s the plan, then?

History, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Nomad

Tin Pan alley, lpc, historic district, Nomad

Via LPC

The Landmarks Preservation Commission voted on Tuesday in favor of calendaring five buildings on West 28th Street in Manhattan’s “Tin Pan Alley,” in the neighborhood now called Nomad. The buildings at 47-55 West 28th Street were an integral part of the area known for having New York City’s most significant concentration of sheet music publishers at the turn of the 20th century, and as the birthplace of iconic American songs like “God Bless America.” It’s also where popular music icons like Irving Berlin and George Gershwin wrote songs. Calendaring is the first formal step in the historic status designation process.

Sounds like a good idea

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