All posts by Michelle Cohen

Michelle is a New York-based writer and content strategist who has worked extensively with lifestyle brands like Seventeen, Country Living, Harper’s Bazaar and iVillage. In addition to being a copywriter for a digital media agency she writes about culture, New York City neighborhoods, real estate, style, design and technology among other topics. She has lived in a number of major US cities on both coasts and in between and loves all things relating to urbanism and culture.

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Policy, Transportation, Urban Design

Corey Johnson, NYC subway, City Council Speaker

Via City Council Speaker Corey Johnson

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson’s comprehensive “complete streets” bill arrives just three months after he proposed a five-year plan to make New Yorkers who take mass transit, walk and bike a priority over motor vehicle drivers. Johnson plans to introduce legislation next week that would require city officials to build 150 miles of dedicated bus lanes and 250 miles of protected bike lanes within a five year period, Streetsblog reports. Johnson said, “I want to completely revolutionize how we share our street space, and that’s what this bill does. This is a roadmap to breaking the car culture in a thoughtful, comprehensive way.”

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Celebrities, Cool Listings, Tribeca

260 West Broadway, lofts, tribeca, cool listings

This massive six-bedroom loft in the American Thread Building at 260 West Broadway spans 3,800 square feet with 45 feet of frontage facing Tribeca Park; the converted and designer-renovated condominium’s $7 million price reflects not only its massive size, rare arched windows and covetable loft bones, but likely also its culturally significant famous past: Built in 1894, the space was once home to Duplex Sound, the studio where world-renowned musicians including Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Aretha Franklin, Earth, Wind & Fire and jazz saxophonist Paul Desmond once recorded tracks.

Tour the loft

Featured Story

Events, Features, holidays, Top Stories

The best things to do this Memorial Day weekend in NYC

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, May 21, 2019

Coney Island. Image via Wiki Commons

The weather has finally gotten the memo, the city’s beaches, parks, and urban islands are open for the season and you’ve got a day off. There’s no need to get complicated; just head for the nearest beach with a picnic for two, attend an outdoor concert, find a BBQ bash or a rooftop rave–or celebrate the day with a parade. What you do with the long weekend is up to you, of course, but you’ll find some ideas below to get you started.

a bounty of events, this way

Celebrities, City Living, Policy

new york public library, nypl, top books of 2018

Image via publicdomainpictures.net

A majority of New Yorkers–95 percent–said in an online survey that Mayor Bill de Blasio‘s proposed $11 million funding cut to public libraries would hurt the city’s communities, according to the Daily News; scaled-back hours and reduced programs like free after-school options for teens would curtail staffing and hiring across all five boroughs. Now, actress Sarah Jessica Parker is adding her celebrity firepower to help rescue the city’s libraries with an online campaign, the New York Post reports.

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Cool Listings, Park Slope

60 Montgomery Street, cool listings, park slope

Just around the corner from Prospect Park at 60 Montgomery Place, this historic two-family  head-turner of a townhouse is in good company, but four stories of preserved and perfectly renovated interiors and a few surprises set it apart from its elegant Park Slope neighbors. In addition to a finished basement, plaster walls, central air and a private garden, this distinctive home, asking $5.995 million, is crowned by a green roof with park views.

Tour the many floors of this gorgeous home

Architecture, Midtown West, More Top Stories, Transportation

Penn Station, LIRR, Governor Cuomo

On Thursday Governor Andrew M. Cuomo unveiled the final design for the new main entrance to Penn Station. The new 33rd Street and 7th Avenue entrance will provide much-needed direct access to the Long Island Rail Road main concourse and the subway, eliminate congestion by doubling capacity for riders entering and leaving the LIRR level and enhance safety and security. Construction begins next month and will wrap up in December of 2020. The new design is the first we’ve seen of the $600 million Penn Station revamp since last September when Gov. Cuomo revealed a new LIRR entrance and public plaza.

More of the new designs this way

City Living, East Village

Trader Joe's

Via Wiki Commons

The latest grocery store news always gets New Yorkers’ attention, and it’s been two years since Trader Joe’s announced its plans to open a new store in a 23,000-square-foot space at 432 East 14th Street across from Stuyvesant Town, just three avenues east of their original 14th Street store. Since that news, there was some doubt that the store would follow through–including a denial of the East Village plans by the company’s media rep. But CityRealty noted last August that Trader Joe’s would be the retail anchor tenant in the newly-constructed residential building called EVE that replaced the former Stuyvesant Post Office at that address. And EV Grieve now reports that the new store’s impending arrival is confirmed on the company’s website–though “TBD” is all we get as far as an opening date.

14th Street, street of groceries

affordable housing, Architecture

Big ideas for small lots, architecture, AIA, HPD, affordable housing

“More with Less,” a winning entry by Palette Architecture

The New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) and the American Institute of Architects New York (AIANY) announced on Tuesday the selection of five New York City-based firms as finalists in the Big Ideas for Small Lots NYC design competition for small-scale, urban infill housing. As 6sqft previously reported, the program was organized by HPD and AIANY as a way to address the challenges associated with the design and construction of affordable housing on 23 lots of underutilized city-owned land. First announced by the city last year, the program falls under Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Housing New York 2.0 plan. The winning proposals were selected by a panel of nine jurors and evaluated on their design, replicability, and construction feasibility. The finalists will advance to the final stage of the program.

See more of the finalists’ designs

Chelsea, History, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Staten Island, Upper West Side , West Village 

Top, left to right: GAA Firehouse, James Baldwin Residence, LGBT Community Center; Bottom, left to right: Audre Lorde Residence, Women’s Liberation Center, Caffe Cino; All photos courtesy of NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project

The city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission voted on Tuesday to calendar six individual sites related to the history of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community in New York City. The proposed landmarks highlight both groups and individuals who have advanced the LGBT rights movement by providing structure for community and political support, as well as raising public awareness. The commission’s decision to calendar the sites comes ahead of next month’s 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising and NYC’s annual Pride celebration. LPC Chair Sarah Carroll said on Tuesday a public hearing to discuss the sites will be held June 4.

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Bay Ridge, Landmarks Preservation Commission

LPC, Bay ridge, historic districts,landmarks, Landmarks Preservation Commission

Image courtesy of Landmarks Preservation Commission

Bay Ridge residents and elected officials voiced their support for the neighborhood’s first historic district during a Landmarks Preservation Commission hearing Tuesday. The commission voted in March to calendar the proposed Brooklyn district, known as the Bay Ridge Parkway Doctors’ Row Historic District. Comprised of 54 architecturally consistent row houses along Bay Ridge Parkway between 4th and 5th Avenues, the district includes a row of limestone-fronted houses–referred to as Doctors’ Row based on both its historic and current residential demographics. This block reflects the neighborhood’s growth from a suburban resort community to an urban neighborhood ahead of the opening of the 4th Avenue Subway line in the early 20th century.

Making the case for historic Bay Ridge, this way

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