All posts by Michelle Cohen

Michelle is a New York-based writer and content strategist who has worked extensively with lifestyle brands like Seventeen, Country Living, Harper’s Bazaar and iVillage. In addition to being a copywriter for a digital media agency she writes about culture, New York City neighborhoods, real estate, style, design and technology among other topics. She has lived in a number of major US cities on both coasts and in between and loves all things relating to urbanism and culture.


Coney Island, Landmarks Preservation Commission

Coney Island boardwalk likely to be landmarked

By Michelle Cohen, Fri, March 16, 2018

coney island, boardwalk

Image:  Shinya Suzuki via Flickr

After repeatedly declining to protect the celebrated walkway–even as its wooden planks become increasingly replaced with concrete and plastic as a result of Superstorm Sandy repairs–the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) has agreed to add the historic Coney Island Boardwalk to the agency’s list of properties to consider for protected status, according to remarks made at a LPC hearing Thursday, Crain’s reports. LPC chair Meenakshi Srinivasan said the boardwalk–its official name is the Riegelmann Boardwalk–could be protected as early as this spring or summer.

It could happen in time for summer

Architecture, Chelsea, condos, More Top Stories, New Developments, Starchitecture

Photo: © Hufton+Crow

6sqft last brought you photos of the amazing amenity spaces at Zaha Hadid‘s first New York City project, 520 West 28th Street. Now, Archinect reports that Zaha Hadid Architects have released new Hufton + Crow exterior facade images of the late starchitect’s recently-completed High Line-adjacent condominium development.
More photos, this way

condos, Midtown West, New Developments

Penthouse rendering courtesy of Aman Resorts

Another Billionaire’s Row sky mansion–this one with a piano lounge, two kitchens, a wraparound terrace, and two swimming pools spread out over five stories at 730 Fifth Avenue–is on its way to record-smashing glory, according to The Real Deal. Sources say an unknown buyer has spoken for the 12,536-square-foot residence in the actual crown of the Crown Building, to the tune of $180 million. If the sale closes, it will be the New York City’s most expensive sale ever at $14,358 per foot (also a record), surpassing Michael Dell’s $100.5 million penthouse atop Extell Development’s One57.

Check this place out

Cobble Hill, Cool Listings, Interiors

29 Tiffany Place, cool listings, columbia street waterfront,

Fitting right in with the refined/quirky feel of Brooklyn’s Columbia Street Waterfront, this two-bedroom corner condominium has been outfitted with pretty custom details that highlight the basics of the warehouse conversion at 29 Tiffany Place. Rustic bones and creative renovations make this spacious two-bedroom home appear anything but square.

Take a closer look

Art, Meatpacking District

A post shared by Banksy (@banksy) on

Elusive graffiti artist Banksy has graced the streets of New York City once again with a new bewhiskered art offering, this time a rat scurrying inside a clock on the side of a former bank at 101 West 14th Street; the building is slated for demolition in a few months. Banksy posted news of his newest addition via his Instagram account yesterday.

More to come?


G train, Court Square, NYC subway

Image: Wikipedia.

New Yorkers love to complain about the slowness of the subway, but what sometimes seems like a snail’s pace is as likely due to speed limits imposed to keep the system safe as it is to crumbling infrastructure and antiquated signals, according to new info released by the MTA. The New York Post reports that after a series of tragic accidents in the 1990s and 2000s, speed limits were lowered throughout the system. Now, a new initiative is investigating ways of keeping subways safe as well as picking up speed.

Find out more

Bed Stuy, Cool Listings, Interiors

863 Greene Avenue, cool listings, Bed-Stuy

Located in one of Brooklyn’s most diverse, bustling and rapidly growing areas, this restored condo at 863 Greene Avenue lies on a tree-lined block between buzzed-about Bed-Stuy and booming Bushwick. It’s a narrow slice of a floor-through, but it’s filled with pre-war character, plus one bedroom and a bath and a half–all for $575,000.

Take a peek

Policy, Transportation

Elevator at the Lincoln Center subway station, via Wiki Commons

The MTA has found itself on the wrong end of a lawsuit by the feds for failing to make its subway stations wheelchair-accessible. On Tuesday, U.S. Attorney  Geoffrey Berman joined a lawsuit accusing the agency of not adding assistance for disabled riders when renovating stations, the New York Post reports. The suit began in 2016 when a civic agency in the Bronx accused the MTA of violating the Americans with Disabilities Act by not creating wheelchair access at the Middletown Road station. The suit should come as no surprise; as 6sqft previously reported, fewer than 1/4 of New York City’s subway stations are fully wheelchair-accessible–only 117 out of 472. In fact, NYC ranks the least accessible out of the country’s ten largest metro systems–all of LA’s 93 stations and DC’s 91, for example, are fully accessible.

Find out more

Architecture, New Developments, Nomad

Nomad’s current tallest tower tops out: See new photos

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, March 13, 2018

277 fifth avenue, nomad, rafael vinoly

We’ve watched the tower-to-be at 277 Fifth Avenue rising skyward over the past year on its way to a heady– though brief–moment as the tallest spire in Nomad, and now, CityRealty reports, the 55-story building is now topped out at 663 feet. Designed by Rafael Viñoly, the building’s understated façade consists of striped masonry bands with four open-air clerestories offering some of the loftiest private outdoor spaces in Manhattan. Though the new tower may only be the 79th tallest in the city, its central Fifth Avenue location will grant its residents singular wide-angle views across the Manhattan skyline and beyond. Photoblogger Field Condition helped to celebrate the topping-out by capturing these impressive views from within the tower’s frame.

See new photos and find out what’s to come

maps, Policy

596 Acres, one dollar maps,

Image via

If you live in New York City, and you’re hoping to own–or trying to buy–property, you might not want to hear about vacant lots being given away for $1. But this is really a thing: An interesting little map courtesy of the One Dollar Lots project by 596 acres shows us where in New York City, according to Untapped Cities, city-owned lots of land have been sold to developers for $1 since the current mayor took office in January 2014. These $1 deals often happen as token transactions as part of a development incentive for prospective buyers, who will eventually need to prove they possess plans and the means to carry out their vision.

Investigate the map, this way


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