real estate trends

Policy, real estate trends

Photo via Creative Commons

New homebuyers in New York City could be charged property tax based on actual market prices, the New York Post reported on Wednesday. A group of city lawmakers is pressing Albany to change state laws to close a loophole that offers tax breaks to homebuyers in gentrifying neighborhoods. The “gentrification tax,” as the Post called it, would have homebuyers pay market rate taxes, rather than the assessed value, as a way to make the system fairer.

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real estate trends

Photo by Photo by Susan Sermoneta on Flickr

The number of chain stores in New York City dropped for the second consecutive year, down 3.7 percent in 2019, according to a new report. Despite this decline in retailers, two stores continue to grow across the five boroughs: Dunkin’ and Metro by T-Mobile. The Center for an Urban Future’s annual “State of the Chains” report found that the coffee chain is the city’s largest national retailer with 636 total stores, adding 12 locations since 2018, followed by the cell phone store, formerly called MetroPCS, which operates 468 stores citywide.

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Central Park South, real estate trends, Recent Sales

220 Central Park SOuth, Vornado, Robert A.M., Stern

Via Vornado Realty Trust and Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Despite some trepidation about the luxury sales market, the year is finishing strong, at least near Billionaires’ Row, which was just named the most expensive street in the entire world. As the NY Post first reported, property records filed today show a $92.7 million penthouse sale at 220 Central Park South, making it the third-most-expensive NYC sale ever, behind billionaire Ken Griffith’s $238 million purchase also at 220 CPS in early 2019 and Michael Dell’s $100 million buy at One57 in 2015. Though it was purchased by an anonymous LLC, the Wall Street Journal uncovered that billionaire hedge-funder Daniel Och is the buyer.

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Central Park South, Manhattan, Midtown, real estate trends

Looking north towards Billionaires’ Row in early October © 6sqft 

A new study of the top “ultra-prime” locations in the world dispels any doubt that Billionaire’s Row is living up to its name. London-based property consultancy Knight Frank, along with Douglas Elliman, looked at the number of homes sold for over $25 million since 2015 and found the greatest concentration along Midtown’s 57th Street, where 41 transactions have been closed in the last five years at an average price of $38.5 million. Manhattan cracked the top ten three more times, with Central Park South coming in third, followed by Park Avenue and Fifth Avenue in fourth and seventh place.

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Featured Story

Features, real estate trends

NYC real estate experts offer their 2020 predictions

By Emily Nonko, Mon, December 16, 2019

NYC skyline, Central Park skyline, Billionaires' Row

Photo by Leonhard Niederwimmer via Pixabay

In some ways, 2019 was a continuation of the past few years: political and global uncertainty loomed over the New York real estate market, development continued at a steady pace, and prices were as high as ever. (Oh wait — they were actually higher.) But the year also brought notable changes, from a total overhaul of rent and tenant protections, increased urgency in regards to climate change, an increasingly buyer’s market, and dry-up of the once pervasive rental concessions.

So what’s in store for the year ahead? Real estate experts believe sustained political uncertainty — particularly around an election year — could mean buyers proceed cautiously. The new rent laws will undoubtedly shape New York, as both the rental and condo markets tighten. Pre-war design will make a comeback in defiance of glassy modern architecture, while the focus on sustainability will increase and amenities will become more flexible.

Keep reading for the 6sqft’s full roundup of 2020 predictions.

Central Park South, real estate trends

220 Central Park SOuth, Vornado, Robert A.M., Stern

Image courtesy of Vornado Realty Trust and Robert A.M. Stern Architects

A penthouse at 220 Central Park South has sold for $100 million to an undisclosed buyer, the Wall Street Journal reports. The Billionaire’s Row transaction is only the third nine-figure deal to close in New York City, following hedge-fund executive Ken Griffin’s whopping $240 million purchase in the same building earlier this year (the most expensive home ever sold in the U.S.) and tech mogul Michael Dell’s $100.47 million penthouse at nearby One57, which closed in 2014.

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Midtown West, real estate trends

Penn-Farley Complex, Moynihan Station, Farley Post Office, Moynihan Train Hall

Rendering courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill via Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office

Facebook is looking to expand its New York City footprint once again. The social media company is in talks to lease about 700,000 square feet at the former James A. Farley Post Office, a city landmark in Midtown currently being converted into a mixed-use building. If the deal is inked, Facebook would become one of the largest corporate tenants in the city with 3 million square feet of office space leased, as first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

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real estate trends, Soho

Lord & Taylor is returning to NYC as a Soho pop-up

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, December 3, 2019

Photo courtesy of Lord & Taylor

After closing its iconic Fifth Avenue flagship at the start of 2019, department store Lord & Taylor will be popping up again as a Manhattan shopping address, sources told Bloomberg. The department store brand, which was sold by former owner Hudson’s Bay to clothing rental company Le Tote for $100 million in cash in August, is reportedly opening a 2,400-square-foot shop for just two weeks in mid-December. The pop-up shop will be located on Wooster Street in Soho–a neighborhood whose current streetscape boasts as many empty storefronts and seasonal pop-ups as high-end designer fashion shops.

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affordable housing, Noho, Policy, real estate trends, Soho

storefront vacancy, DCP, storefront vacancy study

Image: Steven Pisano via Flickr.

The Department of City Planning (DCP), along with Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer and Council Member Margaret Chin, released on Wednesday the Envision Soho/Noho report, a comprehensive summary of findings and recommendations that address issues and guide future plans for downtown Manhattan’s Soho and Noho neighborhoods. The report represents the result of a six-month-long community engagement series on the two historic neighborhoods, aimed at addressing their unique challenges in the 21st century. Contained in the report is a detailed summary of the engagement process that presents the perspectives of participants, as well as recommendations for guiding future plans for improving quality of life, addressing housing concerns, and supporting the unique mixed-use character of these neighborhoods.

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hudson yards, real estate trends

Image by Timothy Schenck; courtesy of Related-Oxford

Facebook this week has signed a lease for 1.5 million square feet of office space across three buildings at Hudson Yards. Starting next year, the tech company will expand to 30 Hudson Yards, 55 Hudson Yards, and 50 Hudson Yards, the latter which will not be open until 2022 and will consist of the bulk of the lease at 1.2 million square feet.

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