All posts by Dana Schulz

Dana is a writer and preservationist with a passion for all things New York.  After graduating from New York University with a BA in Urban Design & Architecture Studies, she worked at the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, where she planned the organization's public programs and wrote for their blog Off the Grid.  Currently, she writes for CIRCA, an online historic house marketplace, and leads walking tours about the cultural history of city neighborhoods. Follow her on Twitter @danaschulzNYC.

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affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

View of the development’s block

Praxis Housing Initiatives “is NYC’s largest provider of transitional housing to homeless people with HIV/AIDS and is one of city’s lowest cost/highest service housing providers.” As part of its 2012 strategic plan, the organization began a permanent supportive housing program, and in just two years time they opened their first development in the Bronx. In 2015, they closed on the second at 2264 Loring Place North in Kings Bridge Heights and built an eight-story, 66-unit building. Of these apartments, 14 are reserved for community-based affordable housing for those earning 60 percent of the area median income. They include $931/month one-bedrooms and $1,123/month two-bedrooms and have just come online through the city’s affordable housing lottery.

All the logistics ahead

Featured Story

Features, History, photography, The urban lens, Top Stories

The Urban Lens: A tourist’s take on NYC in 1979

By Dana Schulz, Fri, May 19, 2017

NYC 1979, vintage New York, old NYC photos, NYC 1970s

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, we share a set of vintage photos documenting NYC in 1979. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

In the spring of 1979, a 20-something Australian tourist came to NYC and was immediately struck by its fast pace and no-nonsense attitude (“there seemed to be an unwritten rule not to make eye contact or speak to strangers,” he told Gothamist), as well as how much in disrepair parts of the city were, especially Harlem. He documented his experience through a series of color slides, which were recently rediscovered and present a unique view of how exciting, frightening, and mysterious New York was to an outsider at this time.

See all the historic photos

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Williamsburg

781 Metropolitan Avenue, Williamsburg affordable housing, Issac & Stern Architects, Adam America

Back in late 2014, East Williamsburg‘s much-loved White Castle outpost shuttered suddenly after the site sold the year before to an investment group for $6.72 million. Burgeoning Brooklyn developer Adam America then stepped in to create, in his own words, “the next hottest development in the area” thanks to its location “just minutes away from an endless amount of cool hangouts.” Architects Issac & Stern designed his vision as a six-story brick and metal rental that makes a nod to the area’s industrial past. Now that the building at 781 Metropolitan Avenue is nearing completion, twenty percent of its 58 units have come online through the city’s affordable housing lottery. These 16 units are reserved for those earning 60 percent of the area median income and range from $867/month studios to $1,123/month two-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

Celebrities, Cool Listings, yorkville

130 East End Avenue, Irving Berlin apartment, Irving Berlin Upper East Side, Yorkville co-ops

Growing up at the turn of the century on the Lower East Side, which was then home to the Yiddish Rialto (the largest Yiddish theater in the world at the time), is how legendary Hollywood songwriter Irving Berlin was first exposed to music and theater. But later in life, he moved his family uptown, first to Sutton Place and then to 130 East End Avenue, an Emory Roth-designed co-op in Yorkville right across from Carl Schurz Park. He lived in the penthouse duplex, which biographer Laurence Bergreen described as “a formal, stately dwelling with impressive views of the East River,” from 1931 to 1944. Now, the still-stately and “One of a Kind” home has just hit the market for $7.9 million.

Read more

Coney Island, Restaurants

Kitchen 21, Childs Restaurant, Coney Island boardwalk, Coney Island restaurants

It’s been more than 60 years since Childs Restaurant left its historic home on the Coney Island boardwalk, but on Sunday the landmarked building will reopen as a massive new food and beverage concept called Kitchen 21 (h/t Eater). The formerly vacant and deteriorating space was redeveloped through a $60 million joint investment among the NYC Economic Development Corporation, Legends Hospitality (who run the dining programs at One World Trade Center and Yankee Stadium), and Cravable Hospitality Group (of David Burke Kitchen). It will hold five separate restaurants, all peddling “summer-friendly fare”: casual take-out spot Coney Island Café; beer and seafood spot Community Clam Bar; gastropub Parachute Bar; rooftop wine bar Boardwalk & Vine; and a more formal restaurant called Test Kitchen.

All the details ahead

Landscape Architecture, Queens, Urban Design

QueensWay, Trust for Public Land, Friends of the QueensWay, DLANDstudio, linear parks

For the past couple years, there have been no major updates on the QueensWay, the High Line-style elevated park and cultural greenway proposed for a 3.5-mile stretch of abandoned railway in central Queens. But today, the Trust for Public Land and Friends of the QueensWay said in a press release that they’ve finished the schematic design for the first half-mile, which could open as soon as 2020. Along with the announcement and details comes a new set of renderings from DLANDstudio Architecture + Landscape Architecture.

All the details and renderings ahead

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Historic Homes, Interiors

NYC’s 10 best historic house museums

By Dana Schulz, Wed, May 17, 2017

Did you know there are 23 house museums across the five boroughs? All of which are supported by the Historic House Trust, a nonprofit that works in conjunction with the Department of Parks & Recreation to preserve these sites of cultural and architectural significance. From farmer’s cottages to gilded mansions, these public museums span 350 years of city history and offer fun additions such as art collections, historic holiday-themed events, and specialized tours. Ahead, 6sqft has put together a list of 10 house museums that represent some of NYC’s most storied history.

Check out our favorite house museums

Flushing, Landmarks Preservation Commission

In a rare case, the RKO Keith’s Flushing Theater is an interior landmark, but the building it’s inside is not landmarked. Built in 1928 to the designs of noted theater architect Thomas Lamb, the elaborately ornamented Churrigueresque-style movie palace has sat decrepit for the past three decades, until Chinese firm Xinyuan Real Estate (they’re also behind Williamsburg’s Oosten condo and the forthcoming Hell’s Kitchen condo that will be anchored by a Target) bought the vacant theater for $66 million last year with plans to develop it into a 269-unit luxury condo. Moving ahead with this vision, they’ve tapped Pei Cobb Freed & Partners and preservation specialists Ayon Studio to erect a 16-story glass tower at the site, which includes plans to “enclose the interior landmark, and to disassemble, restore off-site, and reinstall salvaged ornamental plasterwork and woodwork and replicas” in a new residential lobby. Despite some opposition from the Historic Districts Council (HDC) regarding public accessibility, the Landmarks Preservation Commission voted in favor of the plan, congratulating the architects and expressing great admiration for their design.

More details ahead

Featured Story

Features, History, Meatpacking District, More Top Stories, photography, The urban lens

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation shares archival images of the gritty Meatpacking District from the 1980s to early 2000s. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

“Few parts of New York City have transformed as dramatically in the last decade or so as the Meatpacking District. Changes in the area are physical as well as spiritual. What was once a deserted ghost town by day, nightlife, sex club, and prostitution hub by night, and bustling workaday center of the Meatpacking industry from early morning to noon is now a glitzy, glamorized center of shopping, dining, tourism, strolling, and arts consumption,” says Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation. The organization recently released a collection of archival photos of the neighborhood’s post-industrial grit, “before the Whitney, before the High Line, before Apple and Diane von Furstenberg, even before Sex and the City discovered the neighborhood.” Ahead, 6sqft shares these images, from the 1980s to the mid-2000s, which document the major transformation that’s taken place in just the past decade.

See all the photos here

Transportation

A Barnes Dance crossing in Chicago, via Kevin Zolkiewicz/Flickr

At many intersections throughout the city, pedestrians who have the walk signal still have to contend with vehicles turning left or right. But at some of Manhattan’s busiest crossings, the city may bring back the “Barnes Dance” system, which stops traffic in all directions, allowing pedestrians to cross to any corner, including diagonally. As Gothamist reports, yesterday the City Council unanimously passed legislation that requires the Department of Transportation to conduct a feasibility study about implementing these systems at 25 of the most high-crash intersections.

Read more

affordable housing, Harlem, housing lotteries

1918 First Avenue, Metropolitan Hospital Center, Dattner Architects, Draper Hall Apartments, SKA Marin, East Harlem affordable housing

In March of 2015, East Harlem’s Metropolitan Hospital Center filed plans to horizontally expand and add a new facade to their former nurses’ dormitory known as Draper Hall. Located at 1918 First Avenue, the 14-story building had been vacant since Hurricane Sandy, and after Dattner Architects’ renovation, it’s been reborn as affordable senior housing, containing 203 subsidized units. Those age 62 and older who earn between $0 and $38,200 annually are now eligible to apply for 51 of these one-bedroom residences, for which they will pay 30 percent of their income.

Get all the info

Major Developments, Midtown West, New Developments, Top Stories

Hudson Yards food hall, Neiman Marcus Hudson Yards, Hudson Yards restaurants, Elkus Manfredi Architects

Yesterday, it was announced that celebrity chef José Andrés, credited with bringing the small-plate concept to the U.S., will be opening a massive Spanish food hall at Hudson Yards, closing a deal for the 35,000-square-foot space at 10 Hudson Yards that Shake Shack guru Danny Meyer had previously been in talks for. On the heels of the news, developers Related Companies and Oxford Properties Group released new renderings of the retail and restaurant spaces coming to the mega-development (h/t Curbed), most of which will be located in the “Shops and Restaurants at Hudson Yards,” a seven-story building that will hold the majority of the 25 restaurants and anchor tenant Neiman Marcus.

More renderings and details ahead

Featured Story

Features, People, photography, The urban lens

James Maher Photography, Luxury for Lease, Zombie City, NYC street photography, texting New Yorkers

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, fine art and portrait photographer James Maher exposes the changing face of NYC post 9/11. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

It all started at the University of Madison in Wisconsin with a surprisingly successful fake ID “business,” which was James Maher’s first introduction to portraiture and Photoshop. After moving back to his hometown of New York post-graduation, Maher studied at the International Center for Photography, assisted commercial photographers, and became a certified tour guide, exploring the architecture and streetscapes of the city. In 2006, he opened his own photography business, combining his varied interests, which also come through in his black-and-white series “Luxury for Lease,” where New Yorkers are captured candidly against the background of New York. In it, Maher exposes how quickly things changed in the years after 9/11; instead of coming for “acceptance and freedom” and “a culture of creativity,” wealthy persons from the suburbs and elsewhere began to move back “with an insatiable appetite.” By snapping photos of distracted New Yorkers, many of whom are zombie-fied staring at their phones, Maher examines the “disconnection, hyper-gentrification, conformity, and consumerism” that’s infiltrated our streets.

See the series here

affordable housing, Chelsea, housing lotteries

Rendering via GHWA (L); Construction topped off as of September 2016 via CityRealty (R)

That might not sound like the most enticing location, but with Chelsea’s galleries nearby, Nomad’s booming restaurant and fitness scene just a five- or 10-minute walk away, and Hudson Yards shaping up to the northwest, this newly constructed building at 221 West 29th Street might have more to offer than you’d think. And as of tomorrow, those earning 60 percent of the area median income can apply for 19 units here through the city’s affordable housing lottery, ranging from $833/month studios to $1,082/month two-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

History

Moving Day, May Day, May 1st

An 1859 Harper’s illustration of Moving Day

It’s hard enough moving these days, between finding movers who won’t charge for every piece of tape and scoping out a spot to double park while you unload. But imagine dealing with that headache along with every other New Yorker moving on the same day? Believe it or not, this is how it used to be.

From colonial times up until WWII, May 1st was Moving Day, the one day a year when people in New York City moved. It’s said that the tradition came from the Dutch, who set out for Manhattan on May 1st and therefore celebrated each year by swapping homes on this day. Later, landlords had to notify their tenants of rent increases on February 1st, which would take effect three months later at 9am. Tenants waited until May 1st to move, and the streets would be filled with “moving vans,” Long Island farmers’ wagons led by horses, clogging up the city streets and creating complete pandemonium.

More on this curious history here

Featured Story

Features, photography, The urban lens

Peter Massini, Big City Aerials, NYC aerial photography

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, aerial photographer Peter Massini shares a series of warm-weather shots. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

Last summer, multi-disciplinary photographer Peter Massini shared one of his aerial series with 6sqft that captures NYC’s hidden rooftop patios and gardens. In his latest collection, he’s taken a look down at the city’s more publicly accessible green spaces–parks, ballfields, lawns, and more. Though we’ve seen many of these locations, like Central Park and Arthur Ashe Tennis Center, more times than we can count, we’ve never experienced them like this before, from 1,500 feet in the air. By shooting from a helicopter, Peter is able to get a unique perspective on recreation in the city and just how vast some of these locales actually are.

Get a look at this amazing aerial views

Featured Story

Events, Features, Hamptons, Historic Homes, New Jersey, Upstate

16 spring house tours to check out in and around NYC

By Dana Schulz, Wed, April 26, 2017

It’s that time of year again—house tour season! Architecture buffs, historic home junkies, and garden lovers revel in the spring lineup of events, and to make planning a bit easier, 6sqft has rounded up 16 tours in and around New York City. From Harlem brownstones and Park Slope townhouses to Hamptons estates and Nyack mansions to Jersey shore beachfront homes and Hoboken’s secret gardens, there’s a little something for everyone.

The full event roster, right this way

Featured Story

Features, Interiors, MY SQFT HOUSE TOURS, Upper East Side

Michael Miarecki, Upper East Side studio, tiny apartment storage solutions, beachy interior

6sqft’s ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to the Upper East Side studio of real estate broker Michael Miarecki. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

When Michael Miarecki moved from a huge house in Miami Beach to a 360-square-foot studio on the Upper East Side he knew he needed to get creative. As a busy real estate agent with Sotheby’s International, he says his space “is a good example of taking a small space and creating a big story in it.” By combining a beachy vibe of neutral tones, light fabrics, and comfortable furniture with clever small-space fixes like his custom-built bed platform, hidden shelving, and a carefully curated selection of mementos, he’s created a calming oasis that feels twice its size. He’s even worked out how to host eight guests over for a movie, six for a dinner party, and four to sleep. 6sqft recently paid Michael a visit to see how he does it and what a typical day uptown is like for him.

Take the tour

Featured Story

apartment living 101, City Living, Features

6sqft’s ongoing series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. This week, we’ve put together a list of tips for hiring movers and making sure the big day runs smoothly.

With universities about to let out and warmer weather leading us out of hibernation, moving season in NYC is upon us. And if you’re not one of the brave souls who plans to enlist family and friends to help with the dreaded schlep, you don’t want to blindly hire the first man with a van you come across. From big corporations to small family-run operations, movers in NYC run the gamut in terms of services, pricing, and proximity, but regardless of which route you take, there are several things to consider before deciding. Ahead, 6sqft has rounded up 12 tips for hiring movers, including performing background checks, making sure you’ve accurately counted your boxes (no one wants to be that person), and negotiating the estimate.

All the tips ahead

Cool Listings, Getting Away, Places to Stay, Upstate

ESCAPE Homes, who build “travel-ready” tiny RVs, have put their latest offering in the Hudson Valley up on Airbnb for $145/night. Known as “The Glass House,” the super-compact, 180-square-foot getaway shares the rectangular footprint and oversized windows of Philip Johnson’s masterpiece, but other than that, this rental is one-of-a-kind. Solar powered and off-grid, it sits on 30 acres of rolling hills just 90 minutes from Manhattan and can fit a queen-size bed, fully functional kitchen, dining area, and full bath with a tub/shower in its itsy footprint.

Read more

Weekly Highlights

Weekly highlights: Top picks from the 6sqft staff

By Dana Schulz, Sat, April 22, 2017

 

This Week’s Features

 

Follow 6sqft on Twitter and like us on Facebook. You can also get the top stories mailed to you—sign up here.

Images: Lester Holt’s apartment at 225 Fifth Avenue via TOWN (L); “Mr. Perkins Pierce Arrow” 1946 copyright the Todd Webb Archive (R)

 

Brooklyn, History

A row of Quonset huts in Canarsie, via Brooklyn Public Library

When veterans returned to NYC from WWII, they were met with a Depression-era housing shortage that resulted from a nearly 15-year lack of new development. To immediately address the issue, “master builder” Robert Moses (who by this time was reigning over the city’s public housing projects) proposed erecting Quonset huts on vacant land in Brooklyn and Queens. These curved, corrugated steel “shacks” were used in the Pacific as barracks and offices, as they were lightweight and quick and easy to assemble. As the Brownstone Detectives tell us, after much debate, the city agreed to use more than 500 Federal surplus huts as temporary public housing on land along the Belt Parkway in the South Brooklyn neighborhoods of Canarsie and Jamaica Bay, as well as in Jackson Heights, Middle Village, and Corona in Queens.

Get the whole history

Uncategorized

NYC tourists, tourism

After Donald Trump put in place his strict and controversial travel restrictions, foreign travelers unsurprisingly became wary or coming to the U.S., notably student and youth groups and those from Mexico. In New York City, international visitors make up just 20 percent of tourists, but they account for more than 50 percent of spending, dropping an average of $2,000 each during their stays, which also include more stays in the outer boroughs. However, NYC & Company, the city’s tourism agency, expects the number of foreign tourists to drop by 300,000 fewer than 2016, when 12.7 million international visitors came to NYC, the first drop in seven years. According to the Daily News, this will result in $120 million less in tax revenue for the city and state and $600 million less spending in the city.

More details ahead

Landscape Architecture, New Developments, Williamsburg

With building construction well under way at the Domino Sugar Factory site, Two Trees Management has now released details about the 11-acre park that will anchor the three-million-square-foot Williamsburg mega-development. To be known as Domino Park and designed by James Corner Field Operations, the quarter-mile open space will boast a new waterfront esplanade, six acres of parkland, a plethora of preserved artifacts, and easier waterfront access. In addition to sharing several new renderings, Two Trees also announced that the park will open in the summer of 2018.

All the details and renderings ahead

affordable housing, Greenpoint, housing lotteries

The waitlist is open for $2,611/month two-bedroom apartments at Greenpoint‘s super-trendy rental Eleven33, which goes out of its way to check all the boxes in terms of “Brooklyn living” — from a cyber café with an espresso bar to a landscaped rooftop terrace to a fitness center complete with CrossFit equipment. The affordable housing lottery is open to middle-income households of two, three, and four people earning between $106,080 and $158,550 annually.

Find out if you qualify here

Midtown East

Boston Properties, who owns the former General Motors Building at 767 Fifth Avenue that has the Apple flagship located on its lower level, was issued a permit by the Department of Buildings to remove the iconic glass cube outside the store’s entrance. The Post reports that it’ll cost a staggering $2 million to take the structure down while Apple expands the Midtown location from 32,000 to 77,000 square feet.

Read more

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Williamsburg

East Williamsburg, Slate Property, Ainslie Street, Industrial loft,Factory Lofts, Brooklyn construction, Brooklyn development, brooklyn rentals, williamsburg rentals

This rental building at 66 Ainslie Street may look like your quintessential warehouse conversion, but it was actually built from the ground up last year, designed by Aufgang Architects to blend in with East Williamsburg‘s trendy industrial vibe. Of its 50 apartments, 10 are reserved for those earning 60 percent of the area median income. These units include two $833/month studios and eight $895/month one-bedrooms and, as of tomorrow, are up for grabs through the city’s affordable housing lottery.

Find out if you qualify

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Upper East Side

The price is right, but the location may not be the most desirable for this new affordable housing building, as it’s situated directly alongside the off-ramp to the Queensboro Bridge. Traffic views aside (we’re hoping they installed sound-proof windows), these 20 apartments at 321 East 60th Street include $1,254/month one-bedrooms and $1,511/month two-bedrooms for those earning 80 percent of the area median income.

More on the project here

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Lower East Side

Essex Crossing, Dattner Architects

At the beginning of last month, the first affordable housing lottery opened for Essex Crossing at Beyer Blinder Belle‘s huge mixed-use building 145 Clinton Street, where 104 below-market rate units were up for grabs. As of today, the second lottery is open, this time at Dattner Architects175 Delancey Street, a 14-story, 100-unit building at the megadevelopment’s site 6 that will also offer ground-floor retail, medical offices for NYU Langone, and a senior center and job training facility from the Grand Street Settlement. These 99 one-bedroom apartments are set aside for one- and two-person households that have at least one resident who is 55 years of age or older. They’re also earmarked for those earning 0, 30, 40, 60, and 90 percent of the area median income and range from $396/month to $1,254/month.

Find out if you qualify

Featured Story

Features, photography, The urban lens

Sam Golanski, NYC corner buildings, Narrow and Corner Buildings

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Sam Golanski highlights New York’s unique narrow and corner buildings. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

6sqft recently featured Sam Golanki’s photography series “Park Avenue Doormen,” where he gave the men who safeguard the Upper East Side’s ritzy buildings a chance to step out from behind the velvet ropes and in front of the camera. He’s now taken a similar approach–albeit this time with buildings, not people–in his collection “Narrow and Corner Buildings.” Choosing to forego iconic structures like the Flatiron Building, Sam instead focuses on small structures off the beaten path that may otherwise be overlooked. “I realized the corner is the center of each block, a place for small businesses, barbershops, and coffee shops,” he said, explaining that he didn’t pre-plan the series, but rather was drawn to these unique structures while strolling the city.

Get a look at all the photos

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