All posts by Dana Schulz

Dana is a writer and preservationist with a passion for all things New York.  After graduating from New York University with a BA in Urban Design & Architecture Studies, she worked at the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, where she planned the organization's public programs and wrote for their blog Off the Grid. In her free time, she leads walking tours about the social and cultural history of city neighborhoods. Follow her on Twitter @danaschulzNYC.

Featured Story

Behind the Scenes, Features, holidays, Technology

How the Times Square Ball is made

By Dana Schulz, Thu, December 30, 2021

The 2007 Times Square Ball during construction. Image courtesy of Focus Lighting.

When midnight hits this New Year’s Eve, the Times Square Ball will dazzle people just the same from five feet away or on their television. Making this magic happen is no easy feat, though. To learn a bit more about how the nearly 12,000-pound ball was created, we chatted with principal designer Christine Hope of Focus Lighting, the architectural lighting design firm that conceptualized the current ball more than 10 years ago. From engineering a new system to make all 2,688 Waterford Crystal triangles sparkle to dreaming up the magical light show that plays leading up to the ball drop, Focus Lighting shares the inside scoop on this world-famous tradition.

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Featured Story

Features, History, holidays, Midtown

The 1931 tree, courtesy of Tishman Speyer

The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree, considered the “worldwide symbol of Christmas,” will be lit on Wednesday, marking the 89th tree lighting ceremony. After last year’s event was closed to spectators because of the pandemic, the tree lighting will once again welcome the public to kick off the holiday season. Ahead of the event, learn about the history of the iconic spruce, from its start as a modest Depression-era pick-me-up for Rockefeller Center construction workers to World War regulations to its current 900-pound Swarovski star.

More on the history here

Events, maps

The best places in Central Park to see fall foliage

By Dana Schulz, Mon, November 8, 2021

Photo of the Mall courtesy of Central Park Conservancy

Some of the most breathtaking fall foliage can definitely be found outside of NYC, but when it comes to autumnal bliss within the boroughs, not many places can compare to Central Park. The park experiences a different fall foliage season than other parts of the city because of the tall buildings that surround it and cast shadows on its trees. According to the Central Park Conservancy, the trees have a “distorted sense of the seasons,” creating a later foliage season for Central Park. To make the most of this beautiful season, the Conservancy released its annual fall guide, complete with ideas for exploring the park, and their handy fall foliage map, which lets you know the best spots to see the park’s 18,000 trees in all their yellow, orange, and red glory. Ahead, find eight spots that take the lead for leaf-peeping.

Get the guide to the best foliage spots

Featured Story

Events, Features, History

The lead female runners at 81st Street and 1st Avenue in 2015, photo © 6sqft

The world’s largest marathon takes place this Sunday, returning to the five boroughs after a pandemic hiatus last year. On November 7, the 50th New York City Marathon will look slightly different this year, bringing together roughly 33,000 runners, which is about 20,000 fewer participants than usual because of Covid-19. The marathon wasn’t always the largest in the world, however. Started by the New York Road Runners Club in 1970, the race began as a few loops around Central Park with just over 100 runners. But the passion of its founders, coupled with the spirit of the city, grew the marathon into a monumental event. In honor of the upcoming 2021 Marathon, 6sqft is taking a look back at the history of the race, its greatest moments, and what’s in store for this year.

All that right this way

Cool Listings, Park Slope

Listing photos courtesy of The Corcoran Group

If you’re looking to get into the Park Slope real estate scene on a budget and don’t mind climbing a ladder to go to sleep, this is your place. The cute studio at 475 7th Avenue is asking just $345,000, and it has enough space for a full living room, full-size appliances, and hidden storage. Plus, it’s only two blocks from Prospect Park.

Check it out

Cool Listings, Park Slope

Listing photos courtesy by Kellen Houde of REPN

As the listing says, this townhouse in Park Slope has “the rarest of amenities – a double-wide 37′ garden oasis.” The huge outdoor area has beautiful blue stone landscaping, tiered planting beds, and room for multiple gathering spaces. Inside, the added perks keep coming. Both the dining room addition and the full-floor primary bedroom suite have multiple skylights. There’s also a bonus den and home office, as well as the perfect nook for that Peloton bike. The three-bedroom home is on the market for $3,295,000.

See the whole place

Cool Listings, Hamptons

Listing photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

Beach houses tend not to resonate the same way when you look at them after the summer, but this Amagansett gem would surely make a lovely fall or winter escape as well. Just off Napeague Ocean Beach, the modern home underwent a full custom renovation last year thanks to its owner, fashion designer Tony Melillo. So it’s no surprise that the property echoes the same “embodiment of relaxed elegance” that is the calling card for his signature ATM collection. From the special charred cedar wood facade to the Dineson Douglas fir floors from Denmark, the materials feel cool in the summer and warm in the colder months, while the outdoor space is also set for any temperature, with a patio fireplace and outside shower.

See the whole place

Cool Listings, Greenpoint

Listing photos courtesy of The Corcoran Group

Think that’s a lot for well under $1 million? You wouldn’t be wrong. And you also wouldn’t be realizing that, in addition, you’re getting two full bathrooms, good closet space, a washer/dryer, and a nearly 320-square-foot full-floor bedroom. Located at 198 Monitor Street in Greenpoint, it’s asking $875,000.

Check it out

Design, Restaurants, Shop

Photo courtesy of Chasing Paper

Yelp has teamed up with home decor brand Chasing Paper to create a series of three wallpaper prints featuring beloved small businesses in San Francisco, NYC, and Austin, with 10 percent of proceeds benefitting a select charity in each city. The New York City print highlights spots like Amy Ruth’s, Di Fara Pizza, Jim’s Shoe Repair, and Books are Magic, and its sales will support Hot Bread Kitchen. The trio of fun wallpapers was designed by Amanda Giuffre of Noun New York.

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Brooklyn Heights, real estate trends, Recent Sales

Photo by Jason Puma

Assuming the condo at Brooklyn Heights’ Quay Tower closes for its $10,650,000 asking price, it’ll become Brooklyn’s priciest condo sale of the year. This is not the first record-setter for the luxury waterfront tower. In April 2020, a penthouse closed for $20,301,000, making it the borough’s most expensive residential sale ever at the time. (It was outdone by a $25.5 million Brooklyn Heights townhouse sale in January of this year, but it’s still the borough’s biggest condo sale.) The latest sale is for a 4,544-square-foot, four-bedroom unit with amazing skyline and harbor views.

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