All posts by Dana Schulz

Dana is a writer and preservationist with a passion for all things New York.  After graduating from New York University with a BA in Urban Design & Architecture Studies, she worked at the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, where she planned the organization's public programs and wrote for their blog Off the Grid. In her free time, she leads walking tours about the social and cultural history of city neighborhoods. Follow her on Twitter @danaschulzNYC.

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City Living, Transportation

Photo via Flickr cc

In the summer of 2017, the MTA implemented a new policy to get rid of stock recordings (“we are delayed because of train traffic ahead of us” or “we are being held momentarily by the train’s dispatcher”) and “give more detailed announcements” when trains are delayed. And it looks like they have now taken their honesty campaign to Twitter, correcting a rider that his train was not delayed by another disabled train but rather because “one train crew member had to make an emergency pitstop to the restroom.”

It happens to the best of us

Clinton Hill, Cool Listings

It’s hard to find a decent studio these days for under $2,000 a month, let alone one with 12-foot ceilings, original exposed brick, and plenty of natural light. But this Clinton Hill cutie at 126 Willoughby Avenue is asking $1,850. It is, however, less than 300-square-feet. But what it lacks in space it makes up for in location; it’s just six blocks from Fort Greene Park, three blocks from the G at Clinton-Washington, and in the heart of all the neighborhood hotspots along DeKalb and Myrtle Avenues.

Some different angles

Cool Listings, Interiors, Sunnyside

Buying a home in NYC is rarely easy for young people, especially when they’re looking for that coveted second bedroom. But this newly renovated co-op at 47-37 45th Street in Sunnyside might just be the diamond in the rough. Not only is the place a 15-minute subway ride from Midtown, but it has a small second bedroom/office (currently used as a nursery) and cool barn-style decor–all for the very reasonable price of $429,000.

Take a look around

Featured Story

Dyker Heights, Features, holidays, photography, The urban lens, Top Stories

Dyker Heights lights, Dyker Heights Christmas, NYC Christmas lights, Brooklyn Christmas lights

Where else can you see 25-foot toy soldiers, a two-story Santa, or a house decked out with 30,000 lights other than Dyker Heights, Brooklyn. The suburban neighborhood, historically a quiet, Italian-American enclave, has been putting on its legendary holiday spectacle since 1986, when Lucy Spata moved to the area. Her over-the-top Christmas displays started as a way to honor her mother’s memory (she also loved holiday decorations) and quickly her neighbors followed suit. Today, Lucy is known around town as “Mrs. Claus” and the Dyker Heights lights attract up to 150,000 visitors each season. 6sqft’s resident photographers, James and Karla Murray, recently visited Dyker Heights and captured the outrageous lights and decorations in all their glory. And they were even lucky enough to meet Lucy herself!

See this year’s insane Christmas light extravaganza

Events, Giveaways, holidays

Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress

Did you know the nation’s first public Christmas tree went up in NYC? Or how about the fact that Santa Claus was born here in both literature and drawing? And have you seen the famous restaurant decorated with 15,000 Christmas ornaments, 10,000 lights? Join 6sqft’s managing editor Dana Schulz for her Christmas in Gramercy tour with the Municipal Art Society to see and learn about all this and more. Taking place, Saturday, December 15th, the two-hour event will reveal the surprising origins of our most beloved holiday traditions.

Enter to win tickets here!

Featured Story

Features, Hamilton Heights, Interiors, My SQFT House Tours

Our ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to Laurence and Antoine’s 19th-century Hamilton Heights townhouse. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

France natives Laurence and Antoine moved to NYC in 2006, after spending 12 years in Frankfurt, Germany. Antoine’s career as a software developer brought the family of six across the pond, where they landed in Turtle Bay. But once they got acclimated, they knew they wanted a neighborhood with more character. So eight years ago, they bought a historic brownstone in Hamilton Heights. When asked if they miss anything about living in Midtown they quickly say “no,” as they’ve fallen in love with Hamilton Heights’ charm, convenience, and friendly neighborhood feel.

But take away what’s outside, and Laurence and Antoine’s home alone would be enough to make any New Yorker fall in love. Built in 1890, the 21-foot-wide brownstone retains almost all of its original details, such as elaborately carved moldings and fireplaces (five, to be exact), cozy window seats, and jaw-dropping foliated screens in the master bedroom. However, with their children now out of the house, the couple is ready to downsize and has put their home on the market. But before they depart, Laurence and Antoine invited us in for a personal tour.

Have a look around

Upper East Side

Rendering of what the new Ikea storefront will look like, via Ikea

After teasing us last week with news that they were in the “preliminary” planning stages of opening a city-center store in New York City, Ikea has today announced, that they will, in fact, open their first Manhattan store in spring 2019. The IKEA Planning Studio–a delivery-only store concept that focuses on “smart solutions for urban living and small spaces”–will open at 999 Third Avenue, right across the street from Bloomingdales at 59th Street and just over the Queensboro Bridge from Long Island City where Amazon is readying to bring 25,000 employees.

All the details

Celebrities, Tribeca

After dropping its price from $25,000 to $18,500 a month on November 12th, Michael Cohen’s ill-fated Tribeca condo went into contract on Tuesday, 6sqft uncovered. The timing could not be more perfect for Trump’s former personal lawyer, who pled guilty today in federal court to lying about previous dealings with Russia. Cohen bought the condo at 111 Murray Street for $6.7 million in July but promptly put it on the rental market in August. Apparently, he bought the apartment as an “investment” when he faced pressure to defer the taxes on the $3.3 million sale he made last year on his Trump World Tower apartment. As we explained. “by closing on a new unit, he was able to take part in the 1031 exchange that allows investors to roll proceeds from one transaction over to another.”

All the dirt

Coney Island, holidays

Mermaid Avenue, Coney Island holiday lights

Photo courtesy of the Alliance for Coney Island

For the first time in more than 20 years, Coney Island’s Mermaid Avenue, its main retail corridor, will light up for the holidays. Alexandra Silversmith, the Alliance for Coney Island‘s executive director, told us that the snowflake-themed display “invites shoppers to visit Mermaid Avenue and support our local merchants while simultaneously welcoming residents home.”

Read more

Cool Listings

Chelsea co-op, Homepolish designs, 221 West 21st Street

Perhaps the Homepolish-designed interiors were not enough to entice buyers, as the price of this Chelsea co-op at 221 West 21st Street has dropped to $599,000 since it was first listed for $665,000 in August. Last year, we featured the unit below, which was then owned by BuzzFeed coder & investment banker Will Nathan, who became a partner in the interior design startup after they redid his place. Looks like word spread around the building, because the interiors at this unit are just as chic and charming, with colorful accents popping against exposed brick walls and bold statement pieces. Like the look? These furnishings are available for purchase, too.

See more

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