All posts by Dana Schulz

Dana is a writer and preservationist with a passion for all things New York.  After graduating from New York University with a BA in Urban Design & Architecture Studies, she worked at the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, where she planned the organization's public programs and wrote for their blog Off the Grid.  Currently, she writes for CIRCA, an online historic house marketplace, and leads walking tours about the cultural history of city neighborhoods. Follow her on Twitter @danaschulzNYC.

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Art, Midtown East

New Midtown mural honors 9/11 firefighter

By Dana Schulz, Tue, September 11, 2018

Photo © 6sqft

The number of first responders who deserve to be honored for their courageous efforts after the September 11th attacks is many, but a new Midtown mural of one particular firefighter serves as a symbolic honor to all of those brave men and women. The Post first reported on the mural by Brazilian artist Eduardo Kobra, painted on eight-stories of a building on East 49th Street and Third Avenue. The image replicates a photo of FDNY member Mike Bellantoni “overcome with exhaustion and despair” on 9/11, originally taken by Post freelance photographer Matthew McDermott.

What did Bellantoni think of the photo?

affordable housing, Brooklyn Heights, housing lotteries

Pier 6 and Brooklyn Bridge Park via MOSO Studio

It’s been just over a year since construction began at Brooklyn Bridge Park’s two-towered Pier 6 development, and as of today, the affordable housing lottery has launched for 15 Bridge Park Drive, the 15-story tower (the other is 28 stories). The buildings are designed by ODA New York and have a slew of amenities, including a fitness facility, 4,000-square-foot landscaped roof terrace, and a children’s playroom. 15 Bridge Park Drive has a total of 140 units; the 40 not included in the lottery are market-rate. The remaining 100 are reserved for households earning 80, 130, and 165 percent of the area median income and range from $1,394/month studios to $4,380/month three-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

Financial District, Transportation

Artist Ann Hamilton in front of her mosaic as a 1 train pulls into the new WTC Cortlandt Street station, via MTA Flickr

Three days before the 17th anniversary of the September 11th attacks, the Cortlandt Street subway station that was destroyed that day will reopen as the last piece of the WTC site. The MTA announced today that the new 1 train station, now dubbed WTC Cortlandt, will be back in use tomorrow, Saturday, September 8th, at noon.

All the details

Featured Story

Features, History

354 years ago, New Amsterdam became New York City

By Dana Schulz, Fri, September 7, 2018

Jean Leon Gerome Ferris, The Fall of New Amsterdam, Peter Stuyvesant

Jean Leon Gerome Ferris’s painting “The Fall of New Amsterdam, which shows New Amsterdam residents begging Peter Stuyvesant to surrender to the British. Via The Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

On September 8th, 1664, Dutch Director-General Peter Stuyvesant surrendered New Amsterdam to the British, officially establishing New York City. To take part in the fur trade, settlers from the Dutch West India Company first established the colony of New Netherland in 1624, which would eventually grow to include all present-day boroughs, Long Island, and even parts of New Jersey. The following year, the island of Manhattan, then the capital, was named New Amsterdam. But when Stuyvesant’s 17-year run as Governor (from 1647 to 1664) turned unfavorable, he ceded the island to England’s Colonel Richard Nicolls, who had sent four ships with 450 men to seize the Dutch Colony. The name was promptly changed to honor the Duke of York and his mission.

Get the whole history

Major Developments, Midtown West, More Top Stories, Transportation

Rendering via the Governor’s office

At a well-timed press event this morning, Governor Cuomo touted the state’s $100 billion building program, the largest in the nation, and said if elected for another term, he’d increase that commitment to $150 billion. Among the many airport redesigns and the subway emergency plan, perhaps no project is more dear to Cuomo’s heart than that of Penn Station. And after a tour of the Moynihan Train Hall, on budget and on track to open by the end of 2020, the Governor announced that the dire safety, security, and circulation situation at Penn Station cannot wait two more years.

While construction wraps up at the LIRR and Amtrak’s future home, the state will build a new LIRR facility in the existing Penn Station. The proposal will double access to the trains with new entrances and an enlarged concourse and will create a permanent public plaza at 33rd Street and 7th Avenue.

All the renderings and details ahead

Construction Update, Major Developments, Midtown West, Top Stories

Moynihan Train Hall, skylights, James Farley Post Office

Via Governor Cuomo’s office on Flickr

At a construction tour of Moynihan Train Hall this morning, 6sqft had the rare opportunity to get up close and personal with the massive skylights that will crown this new concourse. The transformation of the historic James A. Farley Post Office into a bright, modern transportation hub is on time and on budget for its late 2020 opening, at which time it will increase the footprint of Penn Station by 50 percent, providing a new home for the LIRR and Amtrak. To date, 800 people working every day have logged more than one million hours of labor, and the four, massive skylights are perhaps the most stunning example of their efforts.

See all the views

affordable housing, Greenpoint, housing lotteries

Transmitter Park via Flickr cc

It’s been a year since leasing launched at Greenpoint‘s 42-unit, no-fee rental 44 Kent Street, and now 13 of those apartments are available through the city’s affordable housing lottery to households earning 130 percent of the area median income. In addition to being located just across the street from Transmitter Park, the building offers a fitness center, rooftop terrace, business center, and parking. The middle-income units range from $2,023/month studios to $2,612/month two-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

Featured Story

Bay Ridge, Features, Interiors, My SQFT House Tours

6sqft’s series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to Daniel and Kyle’s Bay Ridge co-op. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

Bay Ridge may not be on your list of top Brooklyn ‘nabes, and that’s exactly why it’s such a peaceful enclave for those in the know. After living in a cramped West Village apartment, Daniel Saponaro and Kyle Hutchison set four must-haves in a new place to live–a bright and spacious home, green streets, proximity to transit, and great nearby restaurants. They found all of this and more in a beautiful pre-war apartment building on Bay Ridge’s waterfront Shore Road.

When they rented their 1,000-square-foot home in 2008, the couple always had a renovation in their back of their minds, and two years ago, when they were given the opportunity to purchase, these makeover dreams became a reality. Daniel, a fashion designer and women’s clothing company owner, knew that it would take some work to sell his husband, a VP at a higher education consulting firm, on some of his remodeling ideas, from knocking down walls to coming up with creative ways to display their contemporary art and pottery collections. With the help of online decorating service Modsy, Daniel and Kyle created their perfect slice of serenity and learned a bit about their styles on the way. Ahead, hear more about the process and take a tour of this fun and functional home.

Take the tour

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Long Island City

Long Island City, Hunters Point South Park, Queens waterfront

Photo via Flickr cc

Away from the hustle and bustle of Court Square, the area of Long Island City around the Vernon Boulevard-Jackson Avenue subway stop is the perfect combination of the neighborhood’s industrial past and current, amenity-filled reincarnation. Near hip spots like the Alewife Taproom, Tuk Tuk Thai restaurant, and Fifth Hammer Brewing Company, a middle-income housing lottery has just opened for three units at 10-44 Jackson Avenue. Reserved for households earning 130 percent of the area median income, there is one $2,201/month studio and two $2,320/month one-bedrooms. In addition to being close to plenty of food and drink options, this new 10-unit rental is less than a block away from the 7 train and a short walk to the newly opened Hunters Point South Park.

See the income requirements

affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries, mott haven

MLK Plaza Apartments, Mott Haven, Magnusson Architecture and Planning, 869 East 147th Street

In 2016, Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz, Jr. allocated nearly $3.3 million to create 851 affordable housing units across eight projects in the borough. One of these, MLK Plaza Apartments at 869 East 147th Street in ever-developing Mott Haven, received $500,000, and as of today 133 of its 165 units are up for grabs through the city’s housing lottery. The mixed-income units range from $464/month studios to $1,289/month three-bedrooms and have access to the building’s laundry room, fitness room, library and computer room, bike storage, and outdoor rec space and terrace.

Find out if you qualify

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