All posts by Dana Schulz

Dana is a writer and preservationist with a passion for all things New York.  After graduating from New York University with a BA in Urban Design & Architecture Studies, she worked at the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, where she planned the organization's public programs and wrote for their blog Off the Grid. In her free time, she leads walking tours about the social and cultural history of city neighborhoods. Follow her on Twitter @danaschulzNYC.

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Events, holidays, Union Square

The 25-year history of the Union Square Holiday Market

By Dana Schulz, Fri, November 16, 2018

Photo via Flickr cc

Today, flea markets, pop-up shops, and food halls are an everyday part of city life, but 25 years ago, this wasn’t the case. In 1993, after working for several years at Urban Space Management in the UK, Eldon Scott arrived in NYC with the goal of opening a holiday market similar to those he’d worked on developing in London. He quickly set up the Grand Central Holiday Fair and shortly thereafter the Union Square Holiday Market. Modeled loosely on Christkindlmarkts, traditional holiday street markets held during advent that began in Germany, the Union Square market is now a holiday tradition for New Yorkers and out-of-towners alike, with 150+ vendors.

More history and info about this year’s market

Lower East Side, Transportation

Delancey Street via Wiki Commons

Mayor de Blasio has announced the opening of a new quarter-mile, two-way protected bike lane along Delancey Street on the Lower East Side. The stretch connects to the Williamsburg Bridge, the most traveled by cyclists of all the East River crossings, and is “expected to play a central role during the shutdown of L train service between Brooklyn and Manhattan” when it begins on April 27th. Currently, 7,300 cyclists cross the Bridge each day, and the Mayor expects the new bike lanes to double or even triple that number.

Read more

Hell's Kitchen, real estate trends

Photo of another location, via Common

As of April 2018, co-living startup Common had raised $40 million in Series C venture funding, far more than the $15 and $11.5 million raised by its competitors Ollie and HubHaus. Since opening its first NYC location in 2015 in Crown Heights, Common has expanded with 10 locations in Brooklyn and Queens, but they’ve now decided to turn their attention to Manhattan. The company announced today that they will open a 32-bed building at 47th Street between Ninth and Tenth Avenues in Hell’s Kitchen–“a short subway ride on the C or 7 trains into Long Island City and Amazon’s HQ2.”

More details

Architecture, Lower East Side, New Developments

141 East Houston Street, Houston Alley, Sunshine Cinema, East End Capital, Roger Ferris Architect

Nearly a year ago, we got our first look at the glassy box that would replace the Lower East Side‘s formerly iconic Sunshine Cinema. And now, developer East End Capital has launched an official website to market the office spaces at 141 East Houston Street that includes a trio of new renderings. First uncovered by CityRealty, not only do they show an interior commercial space and the ground-level retail, but they reveal “Houston Alleyway,” a new green-walled passageway that will run south from Houston Street.

See all the renderings

Cool Listings, Interiors, Upper West Side 

It’s a hard thing in this city to find a studio that doesn’t induce claustrophobia and is still affordable, but this charming $375,000 co-op at 156 West 73rd Street rises to the challenge. Not only is it located less than two blocks from Central Park and a half block from the 1, 2, 3 trains at 72nd Street, but thanks to 10-foot ceilings, oversized street-facing windows, a sleeping loft, and separate kitchen, it feels a whole lot larger.

Get a closer look

City Living

The Washington Heights-Inwood War Memorial via Wiki Commons

Did you know NYC has one of the largest collections of memorials erected in the aftermath of World War I? 103 to be exact. And to mark the centennial of the WWI armistice, the Parks Department has announced that they’ve completed refurbishments of several of these sites, including Father Duffy in Times Square, the Pleasant Plains Memorial on Staten Island, the Abingdon Square Doughboy in Greenwich Village, and the Carroll Park monument in Brooklyn.

Read more

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Upper West Side 

91 Central Park West, William Randolph Hearst apartment, John Legere apartment, Central Park West co-op

Three years ago, T-Mobile’s CEO John Legere dropped $18 million on this palatial Upper West Side penthouse, but after first re-listing the sprawling duplex at 91 Central Park West for $22 million in February, he’s now dropped the price down to $17,995,000–meaning he’ll break completely even. Not only will the new buyer be able to say they’re living in William Randolph Hearst’s one-time home, but Legre worked with esteemed contemporary architectural design firm SheltonMindel to update the residence while retaining its magnificent historic details such as stained glass windows, elaborately carved woodwork, and ornate ceiling moldings. Plus, there’s an equally expansive private terrace overlooking the park.

Get a look around

Cool Listings, Rockaway

Gaudy Rockaway house lists for an eye-popping $2.5M

By Dana Schulz, Fri, November 9, 2018

Prices creeping toward the $3 million mark are typically reserved for Manhattan condos and Brooklyn brownstones, but this rather unsightly home in the Rockaways thinks it can fetch a similar sum. Sure it’s on the water in the affluent enclave of Neponsit (and has enough parking for eight cars–what New Yorker doesn’t want that?), but $2.5 million is much higher than most comparable houses in the area. But if you’re willing to drop the dough, you’ll get pretty impressive bay views, balconies off every bedroom, a rear deck, and a backyard with a greenhouse.

See inside

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Long Island City

Photo via CityRealty

With speculation about Amazon’s chosen HQ2 cities landing on Long Island City this week, the questions of transportation and affordability in the neighborhood have come to the forefront. And a new affordable housing lottery in the area does not look good for the latter. As of tomorrow, New Yorkers earning 130 percent of the area median income can apply for 10 units at the newly constructed, mixed-use rental 40-05 Crescent Street. Located on the border of Astoria, the building houses 32 rentals, an underground parking garage, and two floors of manufacturing space. The “affordable” units range from $2,125/month studios to $2,741/month two-bedrooms.

See what the qualifications are

Featured Story

Features, Interviews, People, real estate trends

“Integrity, vigorous work ethic, and a strategic business approach,” form the platform that Candice Milano and Malessa Rambarran bring as brokers to the NYC real estate world. But there’s no “broker babble” here. The duo–who recently joined Halstead as the Milano-Rambarran Team–consider themselves the “next generation of real estate,” forming important relationships with their new development clients and growing their luxury resale business. But what sets them apart the most is their mission to bring this knowledge of how to use real estate as a wealth building tool to the public, specifically women. They’ve even created their own platform, Women in Residential Real Estate (WIRRE) to foster this community and connect people through their series of curated events. Ahead, 6sqft chats with Candice and Malessa about how their approach, how they got into real estate, and why it’s so important to support fellow females.

Read the interview

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