Thanksgiving

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Features, History, holidays

Photo via the Library of Congress

Before Thanksgiving became a holiday known for stuffing down food with the people you love, it looked a whole lot like Halloween. That is thanks to the Thanksgiving “ragamuffins,” children who dressed up in costume and wandered the streets in search of swag, asking passerby and shop owners, “Anything for Thanksgiving?” The practice could be found everywhere from Missouri to Los Angeles, but it was a particularly strong tradition in New York City.

“Thanksgiving masquerading has never been more universal,” said a New York Times report from 1899. “Fantastically garbed youngsters and their elders were on every corner of the city. Not a few of the maskers and mummers wore disguises that were recognized as typifying a well-known character or myth. There were Fausts, Uncle Sams, Harlequins, bandits, sailors. All had a great time. The good-humored crowd abroad was generous with pennies and nickels, and the candy stores did a land-office business.”

Read more about the ragamuffins

Events, holidays, maps

Map courtesy of Macy’s Inc.

The 95th annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade returns on Thursday, welcoming the public back following a spectator-free event last year. The parade kicks off at 9 a.m. from 77th Street and Central Park West and moves down its traditional route, ending in front of Macy’s Herald Square. For those hoping to enjoy the parade in person, Macy’s released a helpful interactive map highlighting the 2.5 miles of public viewing. The map also notes where parade-goers can find coffee, food, and restrooms. Learn more

Featured Story

Features, History, holidays

thanksgiving day parade, macy's,

Pilgrim balloon in 1946. Photo via Macy’s Inc.

There are many famous traditions synonymous with New York City, and Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is at the top of that list. The first parade marched down Broadway in the winter of 1924, and in the years since, it’s grown into an event with more than 3.5 million spectators. After a television-only event last year because of the coronavirus pandemic, the iconic Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is returning this year with in-person spectators. Ahead, learn all about the parade’s 97 years and see some incredible archival photos.

This way for the full history

Events, holidays

macy's thanksgiving day parade, nyc thanksgiving, nyc parade

Photo courtesy of Macy’s, Inc.

After a television-only event last year because of the coronavirus pandemic, the iconic Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is returning this year with in-person spectators. On Thursday, November 25, the 95th annual event will feature typical traditions, including the giant helium balloons, floats, and live performances, but with new health and safety protocols in place. Ahead, learn what to expect this year, from the full parade lineup and the best public viewing spots to how you can watch the signature character balloons inflate the night before.

Get the details

Featured Story

Features, holidays, More Top Stories, NYC Guides, Restaurants

Photo: Alexander Stein for Bubby’s

This Thanksgiving, why not leave the big meal to the experts? If you didn’t gather with family and friends in 2020, make the holiday this year even more special, and less stressful, by bringing a chef-curated dinner to your celebration. From traditional turkey and all the fixings from Bubby’s to a Lebanese twist on the meal from the restaurant ilili, here are just some takeout Thanksgiving dinner (and dessert!) options from restaurants in New York City.

Full list here

Events

macy's thanksgiving day parade, nyc thanksgiving, nyc parade

Photo courtesy of Macy’s, Inc.

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade has been a New York City tradition since 1924. In modern times, the event draws a live crowd of roughly 3.5 million and is made up of 8,000 participants, including performers, marching bands, dancers, and more. But those large numbers of people mean that this year’s pandemic-era parade will look a bit different. Macy’s announced in September that its 94th annual parade will be a television-only presentation with participant capacity reduced by 75 percent, a two-day staging, and balloons being flown by vehicles instead of the usual 80- to 100-person teams that corral each balloon. A New York Times feature today shared the happy news that actors from four shuttered Broadway shows will be performing.

Find out more

Featured Story

Features, holidays, NYC Guides, Restaurants

Photo courtesy of Estuary

Let’s face it–this year’s Thanksgiving is not going to be what we’re used to. Many of us won’t be able to travel to be with our families or don’t feel comfortable dining in a restaurant. But if cooking’s not your thing (or you’re just too damn exhausted from 2020), there are plenty of local restaurants offering to-go holiday meals. From classic turkey dinners at Bubby’s and The Smith to an affordable, family-friendly option from Sarabeth’s to something a little more avant-garde like Cote’s Korean prime rib meal or Aquavit’s Nordic-inspired menu, we’ve rounded up the best takeout Turkey Day options in NYC.

Hope you’re hungry

Featured Story

City Living, Features, holidays

Photo by Ethan Covey for Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen

This year has been tough on all New Yorkers, but especially those unemployed, hungry, and experiencing homelessness. While every holiday season is a chance to give back to your community, the ongoing coronavirus pandemic has made helping those in need this year more important than ever. Ahead, find out where to volunteer and donate across the city, whether it’s contributing to Thanksgiving food drives, delivering holiday meals, making greeting cards for seniors, or donating to coat drives. Please note, each organization has put in place protocols related to COVID-19 that need to be followed, including mask and social distancing requirements.

Full list here

Featured Story

Features, holidays, NYC Guides, Shop

How to plan a safe COVID Thanksgiving

By Dana Schulz, Thu, October 29, 2020

Photo by 🇨🇭 Claudio Schwarz | @purzlbaum on Unsplash

Here in NYC, Mayor de Blasio and Governor Cuomo have both advised against traveling for Thanksgiving, but that doesn’t mean you can’t celebrate. One option is to host a virtual holiday. It won’t be the same, but it’s got its selling points (i.e. no squabbling with your mother-in-law in the kitchen or having dad refuse to turn the game off during dinner); it’ll just take some extra planning in advance. If you have family and friends local, you may want to consider a safe, outdoor meal. But we recommend buying a heater now and figuring out how you’ll keep the food warm. Ahead, we’ve put together a guide to planning a COVID Thanksgiving, no matter how you plan to enjoy the day.

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holidays, Transportation

How to get around NYC this Thanksgiving weekend

By Alexandra Alexa, Tue, November 26, 2019

Image by Peter McConnochie via Flickr

Thanksgiving weekend is one of the busiest travel times across the country and can be especially overwhelming in NYC. With the annual Macy’s parade taking over Manhattan on Thursday (despite a windy forecast threatening the parade’s iconic balloons) and Black Friday frenzy, your commute is sure to be affected whether you’re planning on staying in the city or venturing out. Ahead, we’ve rounded up the service changes that will impact the city’s subways, buses, train service, and more.

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