All posts by Diane Pham

Diane is the founder and Editorial Director of 6sqft. After graduating from the University of Southern California with a B.S. in Real Estate Finance & Development and a minor in Architecture, she enjoyed stints at SCI-Arc, the A+D Museum Los Angeles, Perkins Eastman Architects and Resolution 4: Architecture. She also previously served as Senior Editor of Inhabitat.com and spent several years as an analyst at CB Richard Ellis Investments in Milan, Italy.

CONNECT:

Featured Story

apartment living 101, Art, Features, More Top Stories, NYC Guides

The Jean-Michel Basquiat painting that sold for $110.5 million at Sotheby’s. Image courtesy of Sotheby’s

Our ongoing series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. This week we have tips on how to start an art collection for both fun and future profit.

In May 2017, Jean-Michel Basquiat’s 1982 painting of a skull sold for a mind-numbing $110.5 million at Sotheby’s, becoming the sixth most expensive work in history to sell at auction. In fact, Sotheby’s is known to record billions of dollars in art sales annually fed by wealthy art enthusiasts clamoring to hang the most rarefied of works.

But for us plebeians who find the thought of buying fine art alluring but lack the finances needed to bid on a Pollock or a Picasso, what options are available to us?

Ahead, Krista Scenna, an independent curator, gallerist and co-owner of Brooklyn’s Ground Floor Gallery, gives 6sqft the low-down on how regular folks can begin to build a museum-worthy art collection on a budget. Addressing everything from how to vet emerging artists for value to the top three questions you need to ask yourself before you even begin your hunt to simply why you should invest in art in the first place, if you’re new to the world of buying art, this guide is for you!

everything you need to know here

Featured Story

Features, Interiors, More Top Stories, My SQFT House Tours, Top Stories, Williamsburg

Balazs Bercsenyi, Balazs Bercsenyi tattoo artist, bang bang nyc, bang bang tattoos, Balazs Bercsenyi apartment, Balazs Bercsenyi at home

6sqft’s ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to the Williamsburg apartment of Bang Bang tattoo artist Balazs Bercsenyi. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

Despite being one of the most in-demand tattoo artists working today, if you were to have sought out Balazs Bercsenyi several years ago, you would have found him washing dishes in a London restaurant. The native Hungarian, who now boasts more than 250,000 Instagram followers and a client roster that includes numerous bold-faced names, was “discovered” when another tattoo artist encountered him drawing the intricate, fine line designs that he today adorns to the bodies of a select few. With a simple “You should become a tattoo artist!” uttered by his newfound friend, Balazs quickly found himself on a trajectory that would propel him to the top of his industry and into a coveted position at the renowned Bang Bang studio in Little Italy. Now, with a year-and-a-half of NYC living under his belt, Balazs is making a home in Williamsburg. Ahead, he gives 6sqft a tour of his 1,150-square-foot Brooklyn apartment where bohemian vibes and his penchant for organic forms echo throughout.

tour Balazs’ home

Featured Story

Features, photography, The urban lens

flora borsi, the forgotten dream

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or place within New York City. In this installment, photographer Flora Borsi presents a timely series on immigration. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

With Trump’s “anti-terror” travel ban having gone into effect Thursday night, 6sqft couldn’t think of a better time to share Hungarian photographer Flora Borsi‘s thought-provoking “Forgotten Dream.” Following a 2016 trip to Ellis Island, Borsi was moved and disturbed by the island that for decades provided a gateway for millions of immigrants to the United States, and a deathbed for another several thousand who were denied passage because of disease, mental instability, or a lack saleable skills, among other things.

With a desire to commemorate the 3,500 people who died in search of a better life, Borsi scoured historical archives for photos of real immigrants who arrived at Ellis Island around the 1900s. Because the images were originally black and white and sometimes faded, Borsi added color and superimposed them against modern New York City scenes to connect them to present day. By bringing these forgotten immigrants into the city, she says “In this way, their dream came true.”

see more from Borsi’s series here

Transportation

While pols and officials twiddle their thumbs and shift blame for the subway system’s current state of chaos, the Regional Planning Association (RPA) and Rockefeller Foundation are actively looking for long-term solutions to help ease the city’s transportation woes. As first shared by DNA Info, earlier this year the two organizations put out a design competition asking participants to develop proposals that could transform various areas of the New York metropolitan region. Four ideas were awarded $45,000 by the RPA and Rockefeller, one of which included a transportation alternative that would exclusively serve the Bronx, Queens, and Brooklyn.

more details here

Featured Story

Bushwick, Features, Interiors, More Top Stories, My SQFT House Tours

6sqft’s ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to the Bushwick loft of designers Laura Yeh and Zach Jenkins. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

Creativity runs high in this Bushwick loft, which comes as no surprise when you learn that it’s the home of Laura Yeh, a designer at cult beauty brand Glossier, and Zach Jenkins, a furniture and lighting designer at the ultra-luxe Hellman-Chang. The duo moved into their space roughly one year ago following a cross-country road trip that brought them from their previous home in San Francisco to NYC. Although Laura, having studied at Parsons, was no stranger to the city, Zach had never lived in New York. Thus, as new beginnings go, the couple opted to start fresh in Bushwick with an 1100-square-foot cavern with plenty of room to flex their creative prowess. Ahead, see how Laura and Zach use airy style, refined textures, and beautiful furniture designed, built, or restored themselves to turn a nondescript space into a perfectly edited pastel dreamscape.

go inside their dreamy loft

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, New Jersey

History buffs and old house lovers will not want to miss this opportunity to gawk inside what is the country’s oldest log cabin, a quaint oak construction currently seeking an incredible $2.9M. Known as the C.A. Nothnagle Log Home, the structure was built around 1639 by Finnish immigrants and is located just two hours outside of NYC in the town of Gibbstown, NJ. Although modest by today’s standards, measuring 16 by 22 feet and boasting just a single room, the cabin’s current owners say it’s actually quite palatial considering cabins back then clocked in at only 12 by 12 feet on average. Now, is it worth the price tag?

see more inside

Featured Story

Features, Interiors, My SQFT House Tours, Tudor City

tudor city studio, tudor city apartments, tudor city living, brian thompson nyc, tiny apartments, micro living, micro apartments nyc

6sqft’s ongoing series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to the Tudor City studio of  Brian Thompson. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

We’ve seen many solutions for tiny living employed here at 6sqft, from transforming furniture to elaborate built-ins to adding color and patterns to trick the eye, but as far as living minimally has gone, we’re not sure if we’ve seen a home opt for such a straightforward—but artful—setup. Located in the quaint and picturesque neighborhood of Tudor City is the 408-square-foot apartment of historian, activist, and real estate broker Brian Thompson. Rather than outfitting his apartment with built-in seating or complex hidden furniture (though he does have a Murphy bed), Brian has opted for an ultra-minimal setup that includes just three pieces of furniture: a couch, a bookshelf, and a desk—all of which can be arranged into an infinite number of livable layouts with just a simple push or a pull.

See more inside Brian’s incredible tiny home

Featured Story

Be my roommate, Boerum Hill, Cobble Hill, Features, People

Pacific Street Cobble Hill Apartment, cobble hill real estate, cobble hill apartment, brooklyn apartment

To help our fellow New Yorkers on their hunt for a good roommate, we present “Be My Roommate.” If you have an empty room you’d like to see featured here, get in touch with us at [email protected]!

Meet Marie, a laid-back bookworm searching for a roommate for her Cobble Hill two-bedroom. Marie, a Florida native, moved to the neighborhood just over four years ago after a spending several years in Chicago and more than a year living out of a backpack in Central America. Up until a week ago, she shared her Brooklyn apartment with a friend who has since flown the coop to teach in Paris. This has left Marie with an extra bedroom, and for anyone looking for new digs, a great opportunity to live in one of the city’s best neighborhoods.

Find out more here, plus pics!

Featured Story

Features, History, Starchitecture

frank lloyd wright birthday

For many, Frank Lloyd Wright is considered the archetype of his profession; he was brash and unapologetic about his ideas, he experimented and tested the limits of materiality and construction, and he was never afraid to put clients in their place when they were wrong. It was this unwavering confidence paired with a brilliant creative mind that made him one of the greatest American architects to ever live. And one of the most influential.

This week Wright would have turned 150 years old, so to celebrate his birthday and his importance to the practice of modern architecture, we’re paying tribute to the architect’s built, destroyed, and never-constructed New York works. Amazingly, of the more than 500 structures credited with his name, he can only claim one in Manhattan.

Here’s our tribute to the great American architect

Featured Story

Architecture, Events, Features, Policy, Urban Design

new york times cities for tomorrow conference

How do the greatest cities succeed? Find out on July 10–11 when The New York Times convenes the world’s foremost industry experts, policymakers, developers, creative visionaries, entrepreneurs and others at Cities for Tomorrow, the must-attend event for leaders who are shaping the urban environments of the future. 6sqft readers will receive a special 20% discount for the conference.

full details here