All posts by Rebecca Paul

Rebecca Paul is a Brooklyn based artist, writer, designer and strategist currently living in Buenos Aires. With and Undergraduate degree in Illustration and a Master's in design and business strategy, Rebecca is equally passionate about discovering compelling business ventures as she is about exploring her own artistic expression. The written word is her tool for brining the two worlds together. Her previous work experience includes her position as the Business Operations Manager for Inhabitat.com, the leading website dedicated to green and sustainable art and architecture; as well as the Director of Content Strategy for Prodigy Network, a international company committed to building new economic structures through crowdfunding in Real Estate. Follow her on twitter and instagram @rebeccapaulz

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Architecture, Design, Products

arckit, Arckit Cityscape, Arckit Masterplan

Arckit, an architectural model kit manufacturer, has recently added to its family of offerings a series of playful yet professional three-dimensional modeling sets designed to satisfy the needs of building professionals, as well as aspiring designers. Traditional methods of model building include “cut and glue” techniques or 3D drawings, but these kits, called Arckit Cityscape and Arckit Masterplan, provide the same tactile experience with no special skills required.

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Architecture, Hamptons

Water Mill, Desai Chia Architecture

Located in the quaint hamlet of South Hampton, Water Mill is home to some truly beautiful modern architecture thanks to its picturesque ocean backdrop and preserved greenery. And this 4,600-square-foot house from Desai Chia Architecture is no exception. In 2015, the home underwent a full renovation, and the current structure is an expansion of a traditional shingled cottage upgraded with a modern addition.

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History, Video

Robert Moses, the “master builder,” was arguably the most influential individual in the development of New York City’s politics and physical structure. He’s widely known for his hand in creating New York State’s massive parkway network (he built 13 expressways through NYC) and erecting large public housing complexes in low-scale neighborhoods (many of which were segregated), and has therefore been named as the source of many of the city’s gentrification and urban decline issues still present today. Regardless of this criticism, his breath of knowledge and experience was unparalleled (we can also thank him for Lincoln Center, Jones Beach, and countless public swimming pools) and is the subject of this 15-minute television program called Longines Chronoscope that aired in 1953, at the height of his heyday.

Watch the video here

Architecture, Hamptons

Water Mill, 1100 Architect

Located in the Hamptons neighborhood of Water Mill , this modern yet surprisingly rustic family retreat includes a main house, pool house, guest house, bunkhouse, and garage. The mini-complex was designed by 1100 Architect and occupies a total of 15 wooded acres. The main house’s design is a balanced combination of glass and location, as it’s situated on the plot’s highest peak, providing the structure with expansive and unobstructed views of the surrounding property and shoreline from the roof terrace.

Take the tour

Design, Furniture

With moving frequently an assumed part of being a young adult today, furniture startup Burrow has released a new line of modular sofas that are easily assembled, affordable (prices range from $550 for a single chair to $1,150 for a four-seat couch), and can adapt to new spaces with pieces that can be tacked on or removed. The company also mixed the principals of two millennial-loved companies–Ikea’s flatpack approach to shipping and Casper matresses’ one-week free shipping and 100-day free return policy.

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Interiors

Coughlin Architecture, hearst building, 56th street apartment

Living in a tiny apartment no longer has a stigma attached to it. If anything, their inhabitants and the architects who outfit them seem to revel in their diminutive stature. One such example is this mere 500-square-foot penthouse apartment located on West 56th street across from the Hearst Tower, recently given a sweeping update by Coughlin Architecture. The home’s owner, an actor splitting time between NYC and LA, requested an open, bright space, with a minimal kitchen and bathroom.

see more inside

Design, Interiors, Upper East Side

This beautiful Park Avenue apartment from the The New Design Project reflects the elegance and refinement synonymous with its Upper East Side address but also boasts a unique downtown vibe made possible by the studio’s signature aesthetic. The light-filled home is adorned with modern furniture and lighting, as well as carefully curated floor treatments and accessories.

See the whole home

Design, Interiors

NILS HOLGER MOORMANN, Kammerspiel, multifunctional living pods, bed storage systems

For many city-dwellers, living spaces often comes limited, so much so that it’s not uncommon for homes to be referred to as “micro-apartments.” German designer Nils Holger Moormann has created Kammerspiel for these tiny abodes, a sleek, all-in-one unit for sleeping, eating, working and storage. This is the largest piece of furniture he’s ever engineered, and the purpose of the multi-functional structure is to provide a space-saving solution for people with limited square footage.

see more here

Architecture, Bed Stuy

Noroof Architects, bed-stuy renovation

“The great American front porch was just there, open and sociable, an unassigned part of the house that belonged to everyone and no one, a place for family and friends to pass the time,” said architect Davida Rochlin in her essay “Home, Sweet Home.” It was this idea that Brooklyn-based firm Noroof Architects kept in mind when redesigning this 1879 two-story, wood-frame home in Bed-Stuy. It was structurally sound and maintained original details like its covered porch with original cornice and trim, marble mantels, and carved stair balusters, but mechanically required a full gut renovation. To complete their “porcHouse” vision, Noroof added a two-story addition at the rear that they say “creates a kind of ‘interior portico.’”

See the whole place

Chelsea, condos, Hotels, Interiors, New Developments

Kara Mann Design, chelsea hotel

Update 4/4/2017: 6sqft has been informed that Kara Mann’s design will likely not move forward because of changes with the development team. We will provide additional updates as we receive them.

While there’s no shortage of hotels to visit in New York City, some are more worthy of the trip than others, and the restored Hotel Chelsea will certainly be one of them when it reopens in 2018. The renovation of this famous hotel—known since the 1960s as a haven for artists, writers, and musicians, housing famous tenants including Bob Dylan, Stanley Kubrick, Jasper Johns, Patty Smith, Dylan Thomas and Leonard Cohen—has been in the works since 2011, with lots of drama, ultimately finding some direction following a $250M purchase by Richard Born and Ira Drukier of BD Hotels and hotelier Sean MacPherson, last year. Following the sale, the new owners announced they would redevelop the property as a hotel and condos, departing from previous plans of simply converting the structure into a high-end hotel. Now, with its re-opening just around the corner, the first few images of the glamorous new interiors designed by Kara Mann have emerged.

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Architecture, Upstate

Fallkill Farm, Foz Design, Hyde Park architecture, Wolcott Builders, modern farmhouse

Located upstate in historic Hyde Park, this 1830s farmhouse recently underwent a full gut renovation by New York architecture firm Fōz Design. The project, called Fallkill Farm, was executed in collaboration with custom-builder Wolcott Builders, a team effort resulting in what is now a light-infused, rustic, modern retreat that preserved as many of the home’s historic elements as possible, while adding modern, purposeful elements to expose views of the 36-acre property, complete with three barns and a pond.

Take a tour

Design, Furniture

living table, Habitat Horticulture

Two of the smartest things you can do when decorating your city-dwelling are to make use of indoor plants and to invest in multi-functional pieces of furniture. This brilliant new table, aptly named The Living Table, brings these two concepts together seamlessly. The innovative table design from Habitat Horticulture mimics how plants naturally absorb water from the ground, providing you with the perfect plant-ready furniture to house all of your favorite low-growing greenery.

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Design, Furniture

stack furniture, Debra Folz Design

There are all types of stackable furniture out there, and while many of them function perfectly well, they’re not always the most design-friendly items in the room. Enter Stack. This new product line from the Providence-based design firm Debra Folz Design is a sleek, stylish and stackable addition to your home decor. The units are constructed as rectangular-shaped boxes that fit together through a series of grooves, each cut to accommodate metal rods.

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Design, Interiors

Living in cramped New York quarters requires a specific approach to spatial planning that favors efficiency and functionality. In this previously dark uptown apartment with limited square footage, Russian Architect Peter Kostelov created a spacious, multi-functional home by combining a semi-open floorplan with a series of tucked-away furniture that can easily be pulled out or put away depending on which “room” the residents need.

See it all here

Design, Interiors, Tribeca

Gerken Residence, young project,

This massive home, dubbed the Gerken Residence, occupies 6,000 square feet of interior space, plus a 1,500-square-foot rooftop garden, all located on the top floors of a historic Tribeca building. Designed by Young Projects, the unique loft’s inner structure is comprised of three nested prisms that explore the relationship between solid and void. The floor plan also has various cuts strategically placed to hide and reveal the sky and city.

See the whole home

Design, Products

Nimuno Loops, lego tape

This fun product from the innovative design studio Nimuno takes our childhood LEGO obsession to a whole new level. Nimuno Loops are a flexible and cuttable plastic equipped with a block-friendly top surface and a reusable adhesive backing, allowing you to make any surface LEGO compatible.

find out more here

Products

Boskke, cube, self-watering planter

As busy New Yorkers, we always welcome new products that help fill our interiors with lovely greenery while also making it easier for us to care for our leafy friends. Boskke, a design company known for their innovative planting products, recently introduced to the market Cube, a self-watering plastic planter that’s perfect for the plant-loving urbanite. Not only is this compact pot self-watering, it’s also fully transparent, integrating the look of earthy soil into your home decor.

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Architecture, Getting Away, Interiors, Upstate

LM Guest House, Desai Chia Architecture, duchess 

While many vacation homes are the result of an elaborate design process and lengthy construction, this house located in rural New York was designed and then built using prefabricated elements in just a couple of days. The U.S. firm Desai Chia Architecture is responsible for the single-story rectilinear space, also known as LM Guest House. The 2,000-square-foot prefab oasis is located in Dutchess County (about two hours north of Manhattan) and situated on a rocky outcrop of land that overlooks a trout pond and farm.
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Furniture, Green Design

MODOS, flat-pack furniture,

Lego-inspired furniture systems are huge right now, and MODOS may have taken the most modern and minimal approach to the trend. Other modular systems, like Muebloc and EverBlock, are made of “blocks” that easily fit together and mimic the childhood toy in both form and function, but MODOS uses only two components–the small brushed metal connector and streamlined slabs of wood–in its tool-free assembly of desks, shelves, stools, and more.

Find out more

East Village, Interiors

This modern and unique home has been designed by James Wagman Architects. Located in the East Village, Wagman’s team were given a generous 2,000-square-foot space to flex their creative muscles. But there was one rule: the home had to feel warm and private. Sick of living in an open space, their clients, a young couple, had been in the apartment for four years and wanted nothing more to do with the open-space trend. Keen on leaving their loft life behind, they asked for defined quarters, good light, framed views, and the vibe of a peaceful retreat far away from the urban jungle.  Read more

Getting Away, Hotels, Interiors, Upstate

scribner catskill lodge, studio tack, hotel renovation

This 1960s guesthouse in upstate New York was recently transformed into a charming boutique hotel by the Brooklyn-based design firm Studio Tack. The Scribner’s Catskill Lodge boasts a modern yet rustic aesthetic, highlighting both good design and the property’s expansive mountain views. The hotel is located close to Hunter Mountain’s popular ski slopes, which are all visible from inside the cozy hotel.

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Featured Story

apartment living 101, Features, Green Design, Interiors

The 10 best plants for apartment dwellers

By Rebecca Paul, Wed, March 8, 2017

the best plants for apartments

Our new series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. This week we tackle the issue of growing plants indoors when both space and light are limited.

From purifying the air to making your apartment feel more welcoming and alive, there are a multitude of reasons to incorporate plants into your home decor. However, for many of us, keeping these precious specimens alive can be a small but legitimate challenge—especially when space and natural sunlight is limited (like many apartments in New York City). To make the commitment to caring for and sustaining the life of greenery a bit easier, we’ve put together this list of special and very sturdy plants perfect for apartment dwellers like yourself.

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History, Transportation

West Side Cowboy on Death Avenue, via Kalmbach Publishing Co.

The now-defunct elevated train lines of Manhattan are well known today thanks to their reincarnation as the High Line. But before this raised structure was put in place, the west side was home to a deadly train system appropriately referred to by locals as “The Butcher.” The full-size railway line ran from 1846 to 1941 between 10th and 11th Avenues without barriers, fences or platforms, earning the route the nickname “Death Avenue” before it was taken out of operation for causing more than 430 fatalities–deaths that not even true western cowboys could stop.

The whole history right this way

Design, Interiors

s r gramble, park avenue

When one thinks of a sprawling Park Avenue apartment, what comes to mind is typically muted colors, clean lines, and classic decor, but for this Upper East Side duplex, the Steven Gambrel and the designers at his firm S.R. Gambrel created a home that retains this sophistication while displaying a bevy of cheery pastel hues, geometric patterns, and unexpected accessories.

See the whole home

Design, Furniture

MDK9 Dog Haus, modern dog house, RAH:DESIGN

While there are many doggie-abodes on the market, the designers at RAH:DESIGN found themselves struggling to find something that fit with their carefully curated home decor. Instead of continuing their search, they decided to take matters into their own hands and launched MDK9 Dog Haus. Not only was it constructed using modern home-building materials, but it includes human-level amenities such as an overhang for shading, metal mesh siding for ventilation, wheels for easy mobility, and a built-in feeder.

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Coney Island, History, Video

Cycling culture in New York City has been a growing trend for over 20 years. However, its popularity and the bike lanes of modern day New York have yet to reach the impressive status of Coney Island’s 1920s bicycle racing Velodrome. The Velodrome was a wooden racetrack that seated approximately 10,000 people, each of whom came to cheer or jeer the area’s best cyclists.

more details here

Flatiron, Interiors

S. R. Gambrel, Flatiron loft

This beautiful loft located in the Flatiron District was designed and renovated by the firm S. R. Gambrel. Known for their innovative use of texture and color, their execution of the interior is a complex but cohesive exercise in fusing a varied palette of the two. The loft was transformed to create individual rooms, and top highlights found in each are the cabinetry details and the millwork that stretches from the floor to ceiling.

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History, Lower East Side

The mysterious origins of the famous New York Egg Cream

By Rebecca Paul, Tue, January 31, 2017

egg cream

From Brooklyn Blackout Cake to Eggs Benedict, New York City is filled with gastronomic firsts. But while we have a clear origin for most of our foodie favorites, the New York Egg Cream is not one of them. This frothy sweet beverage is made from Fox’s U-Bet chocolate syrup, seltzer water, and a splash of milk, which makes its story even more confusing since the beloved drink contains neither eggs nor cream. There are a few theories currently in circulation about the name and origin of the Egg Cream, each varying in time and circumstance, but most confirming that the drink originated on the Lower East Side among Eastern European Jewish immigrants.

All the mysterious theories

History

horse plague

In the fall of 1872, an unfortunate horse plague swept across New York City after making its way through Toronto, New England and Michigan. The New York Times headline from October 25th read, “The Horse Plague, Fifteen thousand horses in the city unfit for use.” While the city was no stranger to disease inflicted horses, the magnitude of this particular outbreak was unprecedented.

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Design, Products, Technology

Ding uses your smartphone to revolutionize the doorbell

By Rebecca Paul, Tue, January 17, 2017

While smart home technology includes everything from turning on the heat to monitoring air quality, the simple job of a doorbell has been oddly overlooked until the arrival of Ding. A collaborative effort between the London-based startup and creative consultancy MAP (an arm of the industrial design studio Barber & Osgerby), the smart doorbell is a three-part system made up of an exterior button, indoor Wifi speaker (cleverly named Chime), and a corresponding iPhone app. When visitors come to the door, Chime functions as a normal doorbell, but the app allows residents to communicate with whomever is at the door remotely.

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