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Cool Listings, Forest Hills, Historic Homes

Listing photos by Rich Caplan

Designed by architect Robert Tappan in 1925, this mansion in Forest Hills once served as the rectory for St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, a national landmark from the same designer. Located at 11 Cranford Street in the exclusive enclave of Forest Hills Gardens, the seven-bedroom English Gothic style home features vaulted ceilings, cast iron windows, and a triple-height chimney crown. It’s now on the market for $3,888,000.

See inside

Cool Listings, Forest Hills

Listing photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

Forest Hills Gardens–the first garden city in NYC and one of the oldest planned neighborhoods in the country–is known for its wealth of Tudor-style homes that make it resemble an English village. One of these homes, located on a storybook block, has just hit the market for $2,595,000. The brick beauty was built in 1930 and has five bedrooms, four bathrooms, and a fully finished basement rec room, all with lovely architectural details.

Go inside

Cool Listings, Forest Hills

Photo credit: Tina Gallo, courtesy The Corcoran Group

This magical enclave looks more like an English village than a part of Queens, but, in fact, Forest Hills Gardens was built in the early 20th century to resemble England’s garden cities. The private community consists of more than 800 free-standing and attached houses, of which one of the latter has just hit the market for $2,485,000. The six-bedroom house at 34 Greenway Terrace has the neighborhood’s signature Tudor style, as well as a front patio, rear private parking spot, finished basement, and plenty of preserved details.

Go on a tour here

Cool Listings, Forest Hills

17 Bow Street, cool listings, tudor, Mildred Pierce, Forest Hills Gardens

Located within the greater Queens neighborhood of Forest Hills, Forest Hills Gardens is one of America’s oldest planned communities. The ivy-covered three-story single-family home at 17 Bow Street, built in 1905, has been lovingly maintained by its owners over the last 35 years. From the outside it’s a picture of storybook charm and Tudor architecture, garage included. Inside is original woodwork as well as six bedrooms. The home’s historic cachet and unique early modernity made it a logical choice for filming “Mildred Pierce,” a period HBO series about 1930’s Beverly Hills. It’s asking $2.795 million.

Take the Tudor tour

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Queens

Via Paul VanDerWerf on Flickr

A lottery to get on the waitlist for more than 400 moderate-income units launched this week across a few rental buildings in Forest Hills, a residential neighborhood of Queens. The buildings, located at 62-27 108th Street, 108-53 62nd Drive, and 110-01 62nd Drive, are being developed by Phipps Houses, a major developer of affordable housing. The buildings sit nearby Flushing Meadows Corona Park, home to the Queens Museum, New York Hall of Science, Citi Field, and the Arthur Ashe Tennis Stadium. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 100 percent of the area median income can apply for the apartments, which range from a $1,462/month studio to a $2,170/month three-bedroom.

Find out if you qualify

Bronx, Brooklyn, City Living, Queens

queens, diversity, immigrants

Elmhurst’s Chinatown. Image: Wiki Commons.

Recent economic snapshots issued by the state comptroller show that New York City has continued to experience record economic expansion in the past three years. This growth has been led by notable gains in the economies of Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx (Staten Island’s report is expected later this year), which since the 1990s have seen an economic boost from a large increase in their immigrant populations, Crain’s reports. The revitalization of these immigrant-rich areas has led to an uptick in the number of businesses as well as sales and job growth. Unemployment is at its lowest rate since 1990. Queens, the borough that is home the city’s most diverse population and becoming more so, is clearly one to watch.

More jobs, great food

Cool Listings, Interiors, Queens

1 station square, forest hills, co-op, duplex, spire group

There’s a deal to be found in the Queens neighborhood Forest Hills Gardens, where this lofted one-bedroom apartment has hit the market for $329,000. This is the only duplex in the entire cooperative, a historic Arts and Crafts style building located at 1 Station Square. Custom storage and closets maximize the space, which holds a living area, open kitchen and master bedroom below. Above, accessed by a spiral staircase, is a bonus space for an office and second bedroom. The apartment last sold in 2008 for $340,000.

See the space

History, People, Queens

West Side Tennis Club via Joe Shlabotnik/Flickr; Althea Gibson via Wiki Commons

On August 22, 1950, what was then known as the United States Lawn Tennis Association (USLTA) accepted Harlem’s Althea Gibson into their annual championship at Forest Hills, New York (the precursor to the U.S. Open). The spot on the championship roster made Gibson the first African-American athlete to compete in a U.S. national tennis competition, launching a storied career in which she won a whopping 16 Grand Slams, including the 1956 French Open where she became the first person of color to win such a title.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Queens

111-27 75th Road, Cool listings, Forest Hills, Queens,

Just adjacent to the historic “secret” enclave of Forest Hills Gardens, Queens–a rare planned community founded in 1909–is the even more well-kept secret of Arbor Close. These garden-filled idylls share the same covenant to maintain their early 20th century “garden city” charm. Like its neighbor, Arbor Close consists of 1927-era Tudor rowhouses and apartment buildings with central gardens. Though it doesn’t happen too often, one of those rare homes, an elegant, unassuming Tudor at 111-27 75th Road, is for sale, asking $1.275 million.

See more of this charming townhouse

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Queens

20 Ingram Street, Forest Hills, cool listings, grosvenor atterbury, frederick law olmsted, jr, modular, prefab, planned community, queens

It’s also more modern than you might think. In 1909, noted architect and urban planner Grosvenor Atterbury, employed with the firm McKim, Mead and White, was, with partner Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. (son of the famous landscape architect) commissioned to plan a new community in Forest Hills, Queens. The result was one of the first–and most successful–uses of the prefabricated housing process that we’ve seen to date. These rarely-on-the-market homes–like this semi-detached brick townhome at 20 Ingram Street–have withstood the test of time, possessing both a timeless quality and, in this case, a fascinating sense of an early modern era long past but still somehow present in these unique rooms.

Get lost among the rooms and the garden

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