Photography

Art, Events

auction, photography, Swann, events, New York City, Walker Evans, Horst P. Horst, Weegee, Alfred Stieglitz, Ansel Adams, Robert Frank, Margaret Bourke-White, Roy DeCarava, Lewis W. Hine, Berenice Abbott, Dorothea Lange

Ormond Gigli (1925- ) Girls in the Windows, New York City. Image courtesy of Swann Galleries

An auction to be held at Swann Auction Galleries in Manhattan on February 14th will feature historic photos that capture the essence of New York City through the ages. The event, titled “Icons & Images: Photographs & Photobooks,” will put up for bid everything from classics from 19th century portraiture to Edgar Allan Poe tintypes to Nan Goldin’s evocative images of 1990s NYC. This will also be a rare opportunity to own a contemporaneous print of Lewis W. Hine’s dramatic “Empire State Building,” (c. 1930).

Preview the prints up for auction

Featured Story

Art, Features, Financial District, People

Photographer Barry Rosenthal

Photographer and artist Barry Rosenthal is inspired by nature. His latest series, Found in Nature, is a response to what he was seeing and feeling while out on beaches. Barry, whose pieces can be found in the permanent collection of the MoMA in New York City and the Springfield Museum of Fine Art in Springfield, Massachusetts, is himself being found through Found in Nature. The series was recently featured in Brazil’s National Geographic Magazine.

Although Barry works in nature, he has lived in the caverns of the Financial District since 1987. Long before the neighborhood would become popular with young professionals and families, Barry and his wife, Elyn, found that the area — then made up primarily of office buildings — had just what they were looking for: space. Over the last 25 years, they and their daughter Macie, now 18, made the Financial District their home. The family was certainly ahead of the curve.

As a New Yorker, I was curious to learn more about Barry. What was it like living in this neighborhood back in the ’80s, especially from the perspective of a photographer and artist with a keen eye for observing the world? Why did he decide to head out of his studio and work in nature?

READ THE INTERVIEW WITH BARRY ROSENTHAL HERE

Architecture, Manhattan

New york city gentrification, NYC gentrification, NYC storefronts, James and Karla Murray, Karla Murray, James Murray, Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York

If it seems like Starbucks and Duane Reade are colonizing the streets of New York City, there’s now photographic proof. A new series from shutterbugs James and Karla Murray looks at the rapidly changing face of Gotham’s storefronts and — no surprise — they’re getting more corporate.

Gone are the colorful mom-and-pop signage the Murrays shot just a decade ago for their book Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York. In their place? Fast food franchises, banks, and high-end boutiques.

A peek inside the book