High Line

Chelsea, Cool Listings

519 West 23rd street, chelsea, condos, cool listings

Images courtesy of Douglas Elliman.

This full-floor two-bedroom condo at 519 West 23rd Street is a 1,700-square-foot perch above the High Line elevated park in the center of the city’s West Chelsea gallery district. The 11-unit High Line 519 was the first newcomer  to rise along the park and has since been joined by a veritable “starchitects’ alley” of notable buildings. Asking $3.3 million, the apartment has 10-foot ceilings, hardwood floors and direct views over High Line Park through floor-to-ceiling windows. Also among its highlights: A covered 75-square-foot private terrace off the bedroom.

Take the tour

Architecture, hudson yards

Image by Timothy Schenck; courtesy of Related-Oxford

Related Companies is gearing up for the second phase of Hudson Yards—the Western Yard—but there’s uncertainty about what exactly the developer has planned. To balance the addition of another batch of towering skyscrapers, the Western Yard promised to open itself up to the public with a new school and accessible, High Line-adjacent green space. Now Related appears to be considering walling that part of the development off with a 700-foot-long structure “that would overshadow the High Line, accommodate a parking garage and help make the site more like a quasi-gated community,” as the New York Times reports.

More details

Architecture, Chelsea, condos, Interiors, New Developments

515 West 18th Street, Lantern House, High Line condo, Thomas Heatherwick

Photo of Lantern House on 1/3/20 by CityRealty

Related Companies has released new renderings of the residential interiors in Thomas Heatherwick’s Lantern House condo development on the High Line. The quirky towers—one is ten stories tall and the other rises to 22 stories—flank the High Line at 18th Street and stand out with their billowing glass walls that reinterpret “the modern bay window.”

Check out the renderings

Featured Story

Architecture, Design, Features

As the decade draws to a close, we’re reflecting on the growth and evolution of New York City during the 2010s. In the past 10 years, the city has seen the rebirth of neighborhoods, the creation of a totally new one, the return of a major sports team to Brooklyn, and the biggest subway expansion in decades. We’ve asked notable New Yorkers to share which project of the past decade they believe has made the most significant impact on the city, from the redevelopment of the World Trade Center site to the revival of the Coney Island boardwalk.

The full list ahead

Architecture, Chelsea, condos, Design, New Developments

Lantern House, 515 west 18th street, Thomas Heatherwick

Rendering courtesy of Related Companies

New renderings were released this week of Thomas Heatherwick’s first residential project in the United States, providing a peek inside one of New York City’s most unique new buildings. Developed by Related Companies, Lantern House consists of two High Line-flanking towers, one at 10 stories and the other at 22 stories, both with glassy bubbled exteriors. Four new images reveal its freestanding glass lobby pavilion which connects the two buildings and is pierced by two beams from the elevated park above.

See inside

Featured Story

Features, Meatpacking District, photography, The urban lens

All photos © Jonathan Flaum. Photo above: High Line Color 1. June 2005.

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

Photographer Jonathan Flaum started going up on the abandoned High line in the ’80s, when it was full of overgrown wildlife, to see some of his friends’ graffiti work and find a quiet escape from the city. In the late ’90s, he heard about plans to demolish the former elevated train tracks and decided to start photographing the structure. Soon thereafter, Joshua David and Robert Hammond started Friends of the High Line, then a small, grassroots organization advocating for its preservation and adaptive reuse into a park. When they built their website, they incorporated Jonathan’s photos to provide a behind-the-scenes look for those who weren’t as adventurous to venture up there.

The park’s first phase officially opened in 2009 and to celebrate its 10-year anniversary, Jonathan has shared with us his collection of photos. Ahead, hear from him on his experiences with the High Line and see how far this NYC icon has come.

See all the photos

Art, Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District

The High Line’s final section, the Spur, is open

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, June 11, 2019

the high line, the spur, the plinth, public art, nyc parks

Photo by Timothy Schenck, courtesy of the High Line.

The High Line’s newest section, the Spur, opened to the public last week following a ribbon-cutting celebration on Tuesday. Elected officials, artists, advocates, supporters, community members, and architects involved in the project were on hand for a speaking program that welcomed visitors to the new space. The Spur–the last section of the original elevated rail to be converted into public space–extends east along West 30th Street and ends above 10th Avenue; it’s also home to the High Line Plinth, the first site on the High Line dedicated to a rotating series of contemporary art commissions. Simone Leigh’s “Brick House” is the first Plinth commission.

Photos and more, this way

Art, Chelsea

Robert Indiana, High Line, Paul Kasmin Gallery, 520 West 28th Street

© 2019 Morgan Art Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photography by Christopher Stach.

This past fall, the Kasmin Gallery opened a 5,000-square-foot space + rooftop sculpture garden next to Zaha Hadid’s futuristic condo 520 West 28th Street. And to kick off the summer season, the High Line-adjacent space has just announced a new sculpture garden show–a trio of works from Robert Indiana’s famous “Love” series. The pieces showcase the word in English (Love), Spanish (Amor), and Hebrew (Ahava), which, according to a press release “represent three of New York’s most historic and influential dialects, celebrating immigration and lingual diversity in one of the most visited public art spaces in the city.”

Read more

Art, Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District

The Plinth, The Spur, High Line, james corner field operations, diller scofidio + renfro, simone leigh

Image by James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro, courtesy of the City of New York.

The Spur, the last section of the High Line, extending east along 30th Street and ending above 10th Avenue, is scheduled to open in 2019. Unlike other sections of the park which are more linear and perfect for strolling, this section will feature a large-scale plaza for public programming and art and areas for seating and gathering. Anchoring the new section will be the High Line Plinth. As Designboom reports, the Plinth will be one of the only sites in New York City with the purpose of featuring a rotating series of new contemporary public art commissions.

Renderings of the Plinth, this way

Art, Chelsea, Landscape Architecture

Back in May 6sqft reported on plans for the 15 new gallery spaces in the works next to the Zaha Hadid-designed condo at 520 West 28th Street along the High Line, with the Paul Kasmin Gallery to anchor the project, which will expand into a 5,000-square-foot space with a sculpture garden designed by Future Green on its roof. With the official opening of the new building and inaugural exhibitions of works by Walton Ford and Joel Shapiro come new photos of the gallery and of the sculpture garden being installed.

More photos this way

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