High Line

Art, Chelsea, hudson yards

Banu Cennetoğlu, “right?”

The High Line is reviewing proposals for its next two art installations and is asking the public for feedback. The Plinth, part of the elevated park’s newest section, the Spur, which opened last year, is dedicated space for public art, visible from the street at 30th Street and 10th Avenue. Eighty nominated artists have submitted proposals to be considered for the third and fourth Plinth commissions and now you can provide comments for each on the park’s website.

See the proposals

Art, Design, Events

Image by Vicky Barranguet

As New York City slowly reopens with some semblance of normalcy, art galleries are also returning. Earlier this month, the High Line Nine introduced a new initiative that transforms five of its galleries into “living storefronts.” The High Line Nine Artist Residency, titled “Dare to Reimagine,” allows visitors to walk through the corridor in Chelsea and view artists at work through glass-walled studios. And all works on display will be available for purchase through scannable QR-codes on-site.

More here

Featured Story

Architecture, Chelsea, condos, Features, Major Developments, New Developments, Rentals, Starchitecture

The 14 best apartments near the High Line

By Emily Nonko, Thu, July 9, 2020

In the decade since the High Line opening, the surrounding area of West Chelsea has exploded into one of Manhattan’s most desirable areas for developers building luxury real estate. (It didn’t hurt that the opening of the now-famous elevated park coincided with a neighborhood rezoning.) These days, any walk along the park reveals a variety of development in different stages of construction right alongside buildings that have welcomed new, typically wealthy residents over the past several years. 6sqft has rounded up the 14 defining buildings now open around the High Line. There are the early trailblazers, like the energy-efficient condo HL23, as well as the starchitect standouts, like Zaha Hadid’s 520 West 28th, and of course, the new kids on the block, including Bjarke Ingels’ twisting towers The XI and Thomas Heatherwick’s bubbled Lantern House condo.

See the full list here

Chelsea, City Living

Photo by Iker Alonso on Flickr

The High Line will reopen to the public this month with a new timed-entry reservation system. The elevated park, which had been closed since mid-March because of the coronavirus, will open on July 16, with free reservations available starting 10 a.m. on July 9. A limited number of walk-up passes will be available at the entrance at Gansevoort and Washington Streets each day.

Get the details

Chelsea, Cool Listings

519 West 23rd street, chelsea, condos, cool listings

Images courtesy of Douglas Elliman.

This full-floor two-bedroom condo at 519 West 23rd Street is a 1,700-square-foot perch above the High Line elevated park in the center of the city’s West Chelsea gallery district. The 11-unit High Line 519 was the first newcomer  to rise along the park and has since been joined by a veritable “starchitects’ alley” of notable buildings. Asking $3.3 million, the apartment has 10-foot ceilings, hardwood floors and direct views over High Line Park through floor-to-ceiling windows. Also among its highlights: A covered 75-square-foot private terrace off the bedroom.

Take the tour

Architecture, hudson yards

Image by Timothy Schenck; courtesy of Related-Oxford

Related Companies is gearing up for the second phase of Hudson Yards—the Western Yard—but there’s uncertainty about what exactly the developer has planned. To balance the addition of another batch of towering skyscrapers, the Western Yard promised to open itself up to the public with a new school and accessible, High Line-adjacent green space. Now Related appears to be considering walling that part of the development off with a 700-foot-long structure “that would overshadow the High Line, accommodate a parking garage and help make the site more like a quasi-gated community,” as the New York Times reports.

More details

Architecture, Chelsea, condos, Interiors, New Developments

515 West 18th Street, Lantern House, High Line condo, Thomas Heatherwick

Photo of Lantern House on 1/3/20 by CityRealty

Related Companies has released new renderings of the residential interiors in Thomas Heatherwick’s Lantern House condo development on the High Line. The quirky towers—one is ten stories tall and the other rises to 22 stories—flank the High Line at 18th Street and stand out with their billowing glass walls that reinterpret “the modern bay window.”

Check out the renderings

Featured Story

Architecture, Design, Features

As the decade draws to a close, we’re reflecting on the growth and evolution of New York City during the 2010s. In the past 10 years, the city has seen the rebirth of neighborhoods, the creation of a totally new one, the return of a major sports team to Brooklyn, and the biggest subway expansion in decades. We’ve asked notable New Yorkers to share which project of the past decade they believe has made the most significant impact on the city, from the redevelopment of the World Trade Center site to the revival of the Coney Island boardwalk.

The full list ahead

Architecture, Chelsea, condos, Design, New Developments

Lantern House, 515 west 18th street, Thomas Heatherwick

Rendering courtesy of Related Companies

New renderings were released this week of Thomas Heatherwick’s first residential project in the United States, providing a peek inside one of New York City’s most unique new buildings. Developed by Related Companies, Lantern House consists of two High Line-flanking towers, one at 10 stories and the other at 22 stories, both with glassy bubbled exteriors. Four new images reveal its freestanding glass lobby pavilion which connects the two buildings and is pierced by two beams from the elevated park above.

See inside

Featured Story

Features, Meatpacking District, photography, The urban lens

All photos © Jonathan Flaum. Photo above: High Line Color 1. June 2005.

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

Photographer Jonathan Flaum started going up on the abandoned High line in the ’80s, when it was full of overgrown wildlife, to see some of his friends’ graffiti work and find a quiet escape from the city. In the late ’90s, he heard about plans to demolish the former elevated train tracks and decided to start photographing the structure. Soon thereafter, Joshua David and Robert Hammond started Friends of the High Line, then a small, grassroots organization advocating for its preservation and adaptive reuse into a park. When they built their website, they incorporated Jonathan’s photos to provide a behind-the-scenes look for those who weren’t as adventurous to venture up there.

The park’s first phase officially opened in 2009 and to celebrate its 10-year anniversary, Jonathan has shared with us his collection of photos. Ahead, hear from him on his experiences with the High Line and see how far this NYC icon has come.

See all the photos

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Archtober2020