High Line

Featured Story

Features, GVSHP, History, Meatpacking District, photography, West Village 

Rare photos of the High Line being demolished in the 1960s tell the story of a changing West Village

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, October 26, 2017

Crane with wrecking ball mounted on the trestle. Photo by Peter H. Fritsch (1962). Photo courtesy of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation/Fritsch Family Collection.

Few structures have had a more far-reaching impact upon the West Village and Chelsea than the High Line. Its construction in 1934, then partial demolition in the early ’60s, and final preservation and conversion into a park a decade ago have profoundly shaped the way these neighborhoods have changed over the last 85 years. And while photos of its heyday and those of it today as an internationally recognized public space are plenty, few exist of those interim years. But GVSHP recently acquired some wonderful images of the High Line being demolished in 1962 at Perry Street, donated by the Fritsch Family who lived nearby at 141 Perry Street.

The Fritschs’ photos say a lot about how the High Line, and its demolition, changed the West Village. It’s apparent from the images just how much more industrial, and gritty the Far West Village was in those days. But it also shows how the demolition of the High Line left a huge gap in this unpretentious neighborhood, which housed both disappearing industry and a diverse and vital residential community.

See the other photos and learn the whole history

Featured Story

Architecture, Art, Art nerd ny, Design, Events, Features

Art Nerd New York founder Lori Zimmer shares her top art, design and architecture event picks for 6sqft readers!

Times Square is offering up some pretty cool art experiences this week including a late-night 3D movie and vintage telephone booths that have been repurposed to play stories from immigrants to our great city. The High Line is holding a live chess tournament where pieces are swapped out for visitors, and Chesterfield Gallery hosts a group of artists who have swapped paint for textiles. Photographs celebrating the “limitless beauty of blackness” opens at Brilliant Champions, and artist Andrea Fraser gives a free lunchtime talk at SVA. If you’re out in the Hamptons, take some art with your beach time at Market Art + Design, and finally, rumor has it that the Kosciuszko Bridge will finally be imploded.

Details on these events and more this way

condos, Meatpacking District, New Developments, Starchitecture

NYC starchitecture, 76 Eleventh Avenue, Bjarke Ingels, BIG Architecture, HFZ Capital, High Line towers

It was all the way back in November 2015 that 6sqft got a first look at Bjarke Ingels‘ pair of asymmetric, twisting towers along the High Line at 76 Eleventh Avenue. At the beginning of this year, the design changed to a simpler silhouette with more space in between the 28- and 38-story buildings, and now NY Yimby has revealed yet another group of renderings that reveal even more revisions.

The fresh images reveal the glass crowns at the 300- and 400-foot tops, the retail podium and plaza fronting the High Line, and two amenity-filled podium bridges that will connect the towers (an idea perhaps borrowed from SHoP’s American Cooper Buildings).

See all the renderings here

Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

Jazz Age Lawn Party, Governors Island

In a city where hundreds of interesting happenings occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Art Nerd‘s philosophy is a combination of observation, participation, education and of course a party to create the ultimate well-rounded week. Jump ahead for Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer’s top picks for 6sqft readers!

Get outdoors this week: Stay late with a date peeping stars on the High Line; experience a car-free Manhattan during Citi Streets; go back in time at the Jazz Age Lawn Festival on Governors Island; or rent a free kayak and watch a movie from the water at Socrates Sculpture Park. If you need a break from all that sun, check out Ataraxia, an evening of multi sensory art, or head to Booth Gallery for a group show about shattering the Fourth Wall.

More on all the best events this way

Chelsea, New Developments, Starchitecture

From multidisciplinary architectural firm Weston Baker Creative comes this vision of glass, grass and sass in the form of a mixed-use high-rise springing from the Rem Koolhaas parcel along Tenth Avenue and West 18th Street on banks of the High Line. As CityRealty reported, the mixed-use concept would include residences, an art gallery and ten levels of indoor farming terraces. The 12-story structure would rise from a grassy plaza, with the tower’s concrete base meeting the High Line walkway in a full-floor, glass-enclosed gallery that would sit at eye level with the park.

Find out more

Architecture, hudson yards, Midtown West, Urban Design

Hub on the Hudson, Eytan Kaufman, Hudson Yards, floating park

New York architect and longtime visionary Eytan Kaufman has drawn up a conceptual plan to connect the final leg of the High Line to a new island/pier in the Hudson River. Currently, the High Line gets tantalizingly close to the waterfront in its final spur around Hudson Yards, but then swerves inland towards an anticlimactic end at the Jacob Javits Center. Kaufman’s scheme called Hub on the Hudson would build a pedestrian bridge over the West Side Highway, shuttling people from the elevated park to a sprawling, circular-shaped cultural and recreational center. It’s quite similar to Barry Diller’s proposed Pier 55 floating park, which is planned for a Hudson River site slightly farther south in the Meatpacking District.

Extending more than 700 feet into the river, and spanning nearly nine acres in size, the pie-in-the-Hudson plan would build five interconnected pyramid-shaped buildings, comprised of an art center, restaurants, and publicly accessible open spaces. A circular elevated promenade would encircle the island, which Kaufman says would contrast to the linear procession of the High Line. At ground level there will be a central reflecting pool with a promenade leading out to a marina. The pentagonal, pyramidal and circular themes expressed in the plan make its spiritual intentions quite clear: To sail the High Line’s tourists back home.

Check out all the renderings this way

condos, Meatpacking District, New Developments, Starchitecture

76 11th Avenue, Bjarke Ingels, HFZ Capital, Meatpacking, High line

New renderings have appeared via YIMBY for 76 Eleventh Avenue, the Bjarke Ingels-designed High Line-adjacent towers first revealed this past November. The planned project, developed by HFZ Capital with the goal of creating a “self contained kind of city,” was expected to include a hotel, retail space, and around 300 luxury condos with prices to start at just below $4 million. The most noticeable changes from the earlier renderings, which showed the towers fitting together at an angle, show more space between the buildings, which now appear as more of a pair than two complementary parts of a “jigsaw-like” whole.

See what else has changed

Architecture, Chelsea, condos, New Developments, Starchitecture

Jardim, 525 West 27th Street, Centaur Properties, Greyscale Development, Isay Weinfeld, High Line architecture

Foundation work for Isay Weinfeld‘s Jardim condominium is finally wrapping up and portions of the Chelsea development are now climbing to street level. Rising from the swampy banks of a bygone stream, the mid-block site at 525 West 27th Street is giving way to a set of two 11-story condo buildings encasing an elevated garden oasis. A partnership between Centaur Properties and Greyscale Development Group is responsible for the 95,000 square-foot complex; they purchased the site formerly occupied by the Pink Elephant nightclub in 2014 for $45 million.

Find out more

condos, Meatpacking District, New Developments, Starchitecture

76 11th Avenue image by BIG bjarke ingels 2

The latest project to come from starchitect-of-the-moment Bjarke Ingels is a set of towers that will rise along the High line at 76 11th Avenue. The renderings made waves a month ago when the angular, asymmetrical structures were revealed, and at this time it was also announced that the project would encompass a hotel, retail space, and around 300 luxury condos. But new plans filed by developer HFZ Capital Group, first uncovered by The Real Deal, show that the towers’ four-story base will not include a hotel, but rather retail and office space, likely because “[commercial office space] vacancy rates in the [Meatpacking District] are notoriously low–around 2 percent–while prices are high.”

Find out more

Landscape Architecture, Upstate

Wild Walk, Wild Center, Charles P. Reay, upstate nature walks, Adirondacks,

The High Line has inspired countless urban projects, from local ideas like the QueensWay to international schemes like the Chapultepec Project in Mexico City, but it’s not as often that we see the elevated park cited as inspiration for rural projects. But that’s the case for Wild Walk, an upstate treetop trail nestled in the Adirondacks, according to Dezeen. The trail is located at the Wild Center, a 79-acre nature reserve within Adirondack Park, the largest natural park in the lower 48 states. Wild Walk is elevated between 30 and 40 feet off the ground and is a series of bridges and paths supported by pointed towers made from pre-rusted steel tubes, which resemble the cabin-like architecture one would expect to find in the mountains.

Learn all about this treetop trail

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