Financial District

Cool Listings, Financial District, Interiors

Liberty Tower, 55 Liberty Street, penthouse, attic, brown harris stevens

This full-floor penthouse is located within the former attic of one of New York’s early skyscrapers, the Liberty Tower. Built at 55 Liberty Street in 1909 by Chicago architect Henry Ives Cobb, the Gothic Revival-style office building was the tallest in the world when completed. It was home to FDR’s law offices and, later, to German spies plotting to prevent American from joining WWI. Architect Joseph Pell Lombardi converted the tower to co-ops in 1979, with the attic unit retaining vaulted ceilings, exposed beams, and 29 windows offering views across the city. It’s now listed for $2.695 million.

See it up close

Cool Listings, Financial District, Interiors

Federico de Vera, 20 pine street, sotheby's

Federico de Vera is known in New York for his eponymous Soho store, a museum-worthy space filled with artifacts that include everything from 18th-century religious figures to Victorian insect samplers, as well as his A-list clients that include Steve Jobs, Hillary Clinton, Anne Hathaway, and Donatella Versace. According to public records, he is the owner of this gorgeous art-filled one-bedroom apartment at the 20 Pine Street condo in the Financial District. After buying it for $1.1 million in 2008, it’s been listed for $1.4 million. The high-ceilinged pad, with an open living and dining space, offers the perfect palate for another buyer who wants to fill it with unique decor.

Take the tour

affordable housing, Financial District, housing lotteries

The Financial District‘s new 23-story luxury rental tower Exhibit offers what’s becoming the usual package of high-end amenities–a wrap-around roof deck, lounge, and fitness studio complete with a yoga room and Pelaton indoor cycles–but what sets the project apart is that it’s considered the city’s “first curated rental residence.” The building at 60 Fulton Street has on display a collection of more than 100 pieces of art, from works by a 5 Pointz graffiti legend to massive photography, which they consider “a dynamic celebration of the downtown art, music, culture, and style that made New York City the capital of the world.” Whether or not you buy into the hype, you might have a chance to live in this hip building for a lot less. The lottery is currently open for 30 affordable units ranging from $613/month studios to $2,733/month two-bedrooms, reserved for households earning 40, 60, or 130 percent of the area median income.

Find out if you qualify

Design, Financial District, Major Developments, Manhattan

World Trade Center Performing Arts Center, REX architects, The Perelman Center, Silverstein Properties, World Trade Center architecture

Rendering via REX Architecture

The project to bring a performing arts center to the World Trade Center is finally back on track, almost 15 years after the idea was included in the original vision for rebuilding the area post-9/11. Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced on Thursday an agreement for a 99-year lease between the Port Authority and the World Trade Center Performing Arts Center Inc. (PAC) for $1 per year, paving the way for construction to begin. Named for the billionaire who gifted $75 million to the project, the Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center will include 200,000 square feet of space, three halls and a rehearsal space, a restaurant and a gift shop. If everything moves smoothly, the center could open as soon as the 2020 or 2021 season.

Find out more

Art, Financial District

fearless girl, charging bull

Fearless Girl and Charging Bull statues on Wall Street; via Anthony Quintano’s Flickr

The temporary bronze sculpture that has attracted millions of tourists and locals could become a permanent fixture in New York City, according to Adweek. Commissioned by State Street Global Advisors, the Fearless Girl statue was installed last March, a day before International Women’s Day, sending a message to Wall Street for the need of gender equality in the financial world. With her chin up and hands firmly on her hips, the 250-pound statue defiantly faces the iconic Charging Bull statue, which has stood in the same spot since 1989. And now the city might relocate the pair of statues from Bowling Green Park in lower Manhattan to another, more pedestrian-friendly home to ease safety concerns.

Find out more

Featured Story

Features, Financial District, History

Six things you didn’t know about the Lower West Side

By Historic Districts Council, Wed, February 14, 2018

59-81-Washington-Street ca. 1935, via NYPL

This post is part of a series by the Historic Districts Council, exploring the groups selected for their Six to Celebrate program, New York’s only targeted citywide list of preservation priorities.

The Lower West Side may not be a neighborhood name used by brokers, but for those involved with preservation efforts in the area, it’s a neighborhood very much unique from the surrounding Financial District. Encompassing the area west of Broadway from Liberty Street to Battery Place, it was originally home to Irish and German immigrants, followed by Little Syria, the nation’s first and largest Arabic settlement, from roughly the 1880s to 1940s. But the construction of the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel and World Trade Center “nearly wiped the neighborhood off the map.” There are still several buildings remaining that serve as a connection to the past, however, and Friends of the Lower West Side is working diligently to make sure this history is not lost, expanding its oral history program, offering walking tours of the area, and appealing to the Landmarks Commission to designate a small historic district.

Find out six little-known facts about this amazing district

affordable housing, Financial District, housing lotteries

A 762-foot skyscraper in the Financial District is now accepting applications for 97 affordable apartments. Developed by Carmel Partners and designed by Gerner Kronick + Valcarcel and SLCE Architects, the residential development at 118 Fulton Street (also known as 19 Dutch Street) contains 483 rental units. The glassy tower will have over 8,000 square feet of retail space on the cellar, first and second levels. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 60 percent of the area median income can apply for units ranging from $788/month studios to $1,025/month two-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

Battery Park City, Construction Update, Financial District

Photo courtesy of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America

Construction company Skanska USA stopped work at the St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church this month after the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America failed to make payments on the project. The cost of rebuilding the church, which was destroyed in the terror attacks on 9/11 more than sixteen years ago, increased to an estimated $78 million from a 2013 estimate of $20 million. While the archdiocese raised $37 million in donations, it was still unable to pay its bills, prompting an independent investigation of the church’s financial mismanagement, as the New York Times reported. Since learning of its deficit, the archdiocese has cut 25 percent of its staff and 25 percent of its expenses. A new treasurer and a chief financial officer have also been hired.

More this way

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Financial District, History, photography, The urban lens

In 1883, one of NYC’s first skyscrapers opened at the corner of Nassau and Beekman Streets. Known as Temple Court, the nine-story red brick and terra cotta structure was designed in the Queen Anne style by architect James M. Farnworth to attract accountants and lawyers who needed to be close to the city’s courthouses. Its most impressive feature was its central atrium that rises the full height and is topped by a large pyramid-shaped skylight and two rooftop turrets.

In the 1940s, this romantic atrium was walled in from top to bottom, and by 2001, the last commercial tenant moved out, ultimately sending the building into disrepair, a crumbling shell open to the elements. Plans to restore Temple Court into The Beekman hotel and add an adjacent 51-story condominium tower first surfaced in 2008, but before work got underway in 2012, we were granted the rare opportunity to explore the architectural gem in its eerily beautiful derelict state. And now that guests are filling up the 287 hotel rooms, the main floor is buzzing with restaurants from restaurateurs Tom Colicchio and Keith McNally, and the atrium’s skylight and Victorian cast iron railings and ornamentation have been restored, we went back in to document how this one-of-a-kind landmark has been restored.

See the before-and-after photos and learn about our experience

Architecture, condos, Financial District, New Developments, Starchitecture

130 William Street, David Adjaye, Adjaye Associates, Lightstone Group, Financial District condos

Renderings courtesy of Lightstone

Nearly four years after wrapping up his first NYC project, Harlem’s Sugar Hill affordable housing development, renowned British architect David Adjaye is inching closer to completing his first skyscraper in the city. Preliminary plans for his Financial District condo tower surfaced in May, but developer Lightstone has shared the first official reveal of the tower, now known as 130 William. The height has increased from 750 to 800 feet, or 61 to 66 stories, and it will hold 244 residences. Adjaye says the “rich history” of one of “the city’s earliest streets” influenced the building’s unique concrete form. “I was inspired to craft a building that turns away from the commercial feel of glass and that instead celebrates New York’s heritage of masonry architecture with a distinctive presence in Manhattan’s skyline,” he said.

More details and renderings ahead


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