Financial District

Cool Listings, Financial District

Photo courtesy of Douglas Elliman

A spacious full-floor loft with two outdoor terraces in the Financial District is asking $2.48 million. The two-bedroom, two-bath condo is located at 119 Fulton Street and has perfectly-framed Freedom Tower views. The apartment features a newly renovated kitchen with top-of-the-line appliances, custom built-ins, keyed elevator access, and outdoor spaces on either end of the unit.

More ahead

Architecture, condos, Design, Financial District

All residence images courtesy of Aston Martin

Five apartments for sale at Sir David Adjaye’s first New York City tower have been custom-designed by luxury carmaker Aston Martin. Located on the 59th and 60th floors of 130 William, a 66-story condo in the Financial District, the exclusive units come with a special edition Aston Martin DBX, an SUV designed in collaboration with Adjaye. The five condos include two penthouses, one priced at $11.5 million and the second at $10.5 million, and three loggia residences, priced at $3.985 million, $5.985 million, and $10 million.

See inside

Events, Financial District

Photo courtesy of @meetresident

When outdoor dining launched this past summer, New Yorkers had a number of unique spots to dine al fresco, from the most photographed block in Brooklyn to one of the city’s oldest streets. A special outdoor dining experience has launched in New York, created by Resident, a startup that hosts dinners on balconies and rooftops of luxury apartments. Next month, the company is hosting a socially-distant supper club at the Broad Exchange Building, a landmarked skyscraper in the Financial District.

Get the details

Featured Story

Features, Financial District, History, Transportation

Photo © James and Karla Murray

When the New York City subway opened on October 27th, 1904, it was the magnificent City Hall station that served as the backdrop for the festivities, with its arched Guastavino-tiled ceiling and skylights. But by 1945, the newer, longer subway cars could no longer fit on the station’s curved tracks, so it was closed. Today, the New York City Transit Museum occasionally offers tours of the abandoned station, which is how photographers James and Karla Murray were able to capture these beautiful photos. Ahead, see more of the station and learn all about its history.

Read more

Events, Financial District

Image by David Z from Pixabay

It takes nearly 40 stagehands and electricians more than a week to produce the annual Tribute in Light display that marks the 9/11 anniversary each year, according to the New York Times. And because they must work in close contact, the National September 11 Memorial & Museum decided last week to cancel this year’s memorial. Upon hearing the news, Governor Cuomo, however, stepped in and said he’d provide the medical personnel necessary to make the event happen safely.

More details here

Events, Financial District, Restaurants

Photo of The Greens courtesy of The Howard Hughes Corporation

Social distancing guidelines have definitely gotten restaurants to be extra creative, like The Rooftop at Pier 17 which has just opened a new dining experience where guests can book one of 28 “mini-lawns.” Called The Greens, the experience has transformed the South Street Seaport rooftop venue into private cabana-style plots, each of which can accommodate eight guests.

Read more

Construction Update, Financial District

All photos courtesy of Governor Andrew Cuomo/Flickr

It’s been nearly 20 years since St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church and National Shrine was lost in the attacks on 9/11, but today, Governor Cuomo announced the restart of construction on the new Santiago Calatrava-designed church. Work originally began in 2015, but stalled in late 2017 when the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America ran out of funding.

Read more

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Financial District, History

Woolworth Building, historic photos of the Woolworth Building, NYC then and now photos, historic NYC photos

The Woolworth Building, then and now. L: Image courtesy of Library of Congress via Wiki cc; r: Image Norbert Nagel via Wiki cc.

When the neo-Gothic Woolworth Building at 233 Broadway was erected in 1913 as the world’s tallest building, it cost a total of $13.5 million to construct. Though many have surpassed it in height, the instantly-recognizable Lower Manhattan landmark has remained one of the world’s most iconic buildings, admired for its terra cotta facade and detailed ornamentation–and its representation of the ambitious era in which it arose. Developer and five-and-dime store entrepreneur Frank Winfield Woolworth dreamed of an unforgettable skyscraper; the building’s architect, Cass Gilbert, designed and delivered just that, even as Woolworth’s vision grew progressively loftier. The Woolworth Building has remained an anchor of New York City life with its storied past and still-impressive 792-foot height.

Find the city’s history in the Woolworth Building

Financial District, Green Design, Landscape Architecture

battery playscape, the battery, nyc parks

The “bluffs” zone includes five granite slides and boulder scrambles; renderings courtesy of BKSK Architects & Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Planners

As the threat of climate change grows, parks in New York City are working to become more resilient. Officials on Thursday broke ground on an $18.3 million waterfront playground at the Battery in the Financial District. The Battery Playscape, as it’s being called, is expected to be one of the city’s largest sustainable parks. It will triple the size of the current playground and will feature a rainwater runoff system and a wide variety of durable plants.

See the design

Financial District, Major Developments, Starchitecture

2 World Trade Center, BIG, Bjarke Ingels, NYC starchitecture

Previous rendering of 2 World Center via DBOX, courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group

It looks like Norman Foster’s design for 2 World Trade Center might rise after all. First unveiled in 2006, the original Foster + Partners proposal was scrapped in 2015 for Bjarke Ingels’ stacked tower, which was deemed more suitable to prospective media tenants. After leases with Fox and News Corp. fell through in 2016, the future of the tenant-less tower has remained uncertain. Absent any takers, developer Larry Silverstein is now pivoting back to the Foster vision, the New York Post reports. The old design is being “significantly modified to be more reflective of contemporary needs and taste,” Silverstein said.

More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.