Financial District

Architecture, condos, Financial District, New Developments, Starchitecture, Top Stories

130 William, David Adjaye, Adjaye Associates

Renderings by Binyan

With construction officially underway at 130 William Street and sales launching for the 244 condos later this month, Sir David Adjaye hosted an event last night to reveal the interiors of his 800-foot Financial District tower. And they’re just as chic as expected, with finishes made from materials sourced from all over the world and hardware designed by the starchitect himself. Adjaye Associates collaborated with Hill West Architects on the project.

“In defining the design for 130 William, I not only sought to celebrate New York City’s heritage of masonry architecture, referencing the historical architecture once pervasive upon one of the city’s earliest streets,” Adjaye said. “However, and more importantly, 130 William has been crafted to focus on the new possibilities of urban, vertical living.”

See the renderings here

Architecture, Financial District, Major Developments, New Developments, Tribeca

Via Silverstein Properties

Right on schedule for a June opening, developer Silverstein Properties took the lead in celebrating on Monday the highly anticipated opening of 3 World Trade Center with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Led by CEO Larry Silverstein, the morning celebration at 3 World Trade Center at 175 Greenwich Street marked the official completion of four of the five buildings in the new World Trade Center complex. With nearly 40 percent of the building leased on opening day, the 80-floor tower designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners rises to 1,079 feet.

“Starting with 7 WTC and the rest of the towers that followed, we sought to create modern, environmentally-conscious and technologically-advanced offices,” Larry Silverstein, the chairman of Silverstein Properties, said in a statement. “Places that foster creativity where young people would want to work and collaborate. That meant great architecture and sustainable design, but also improved transportation, a more vibrant streetscape, new shops and restaurants, great public spaces, and exciting and fun public space art.”

Find out more

Architecture, Construction Update, Financial District, New Developments, Starchitecture

david adjaye, 130 William Street, Financial District, new developments, lightstone group

Back in April 6sqft reported on the progress of British-Ghanian architect David Adjaye’s first NYC skyscraper at 130 William street, with the nearly-800-foot tower at street level and rising. Adjaye, who has achieved international renown for projects like the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, has been knighted by Queen Elizabeth II and named one of TIME’s 2017 most influential people, was inspired by the  historic masonry architecture of the Financial District for the new building’s anything-but-ordinary design. And we’re now seeing more of that design: The New York Times reveals information on what the pricing for the building’s 800 units is likely to be once sales launch, along with some new renderings of its unique architecture and interiors.

Let’s hear those prices. And when can we move in?

Design, Financial District, Museums

9/11 Memorial, Memorial Glade, 9/11 toxins, MOSO Studio, 9/11 post-attack victims

Sixteen years ago as of yesterday, the rescue and recovery effort for the September 11th attacks ended. It’s estimated that 400,000 people were exposed to life-threatening toxins, and since then, nearly 70,000 first responders and more than 14,000 survivors have enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Program. Yesterday, former “Daily Show” host Jon Stewart and 9/11 Memorial & Museum president Alice Greenwald revealed the official design for Memorial Glade, a monument to all those who have lost their lives or are sick due to these related illnesses. In addition to increasing awareness about the health crisis, the memorial will also “recognize the tremendous capacity of the human spirit, as exemplified during the rescue, recovery and relief efforts following the 9/11 attacks.”

Learn about the design

Design, Financial District, Policy

In an effort to enhance the accessibility and the appearance of the New York Stock Exchange district, a new proposal is calling for curbless streets, enhanced lighting, multi-functional seating and simplified security structures. The Alliance for Downtown New York released on Monday a study that details ways to improve the historic area to make it more appealing and easier to navigate. While the corner of Wall and Broad Street has witnessed more than 400 years of Lower Manhattan history, starting when Dutch settlers built a wall as the city’s northern border, the area is not living up to its potential as one of New York City’s crown jewels, according to Jessica Lappin, the president of the Alliance.

The study is the result of a nine-month process, with the Alliance working in tandem with local stakeholders, community members and design partners, WXY Architecture + Urban Design. “This report lays out a roadmap,” Lappin said in a press release. “It is a grand yet achievable vision that could turn the Stock Exchange District into the jewel it should be.” The group estimates the overhaul project will cost roughly $30 million.

See the proposal

Architecture, condos, Financial District

Rendering of One Beekman courtesy of Noë & Associates with The Boundary

New renderings have been unveiled for One Beekman, a mixed-use development designed by Richard Rogers, and it has nearly reached its 25-story pinnacle in the Financial District. As the firm’s first residential project in the United States, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners have designed a tower that provides every single apartment with views of City Hall Park by shifting the circulation core to the south, according to the New York Times. The front of the building is open with oversized windows, allowing for half of the 31 total condo units to have outdoor terraces overlooking the park.

See them here

Architecture, Financial District

Rendering of the canopy at the graveyard via Trinity Wall Street

The Trinity Church, whose history in New York City dates back 300 years, will partially close beginning Monday for a two-year, $98.6 million renovation of its nave, the main part of the church. As its first major revitalization in over 70 years, the landmarked church’s project will restore parts of the original 1846 Gothic Revival style designed by Richard Upjohn. This includes rebuilding the chancel to its original size, increasing capacity by 140 seats and painting the interior walls and ceilings to reflect the original stone design. The reconstruction will move services and events at the Episcopal parish to nearby St. Paul’s Chapel, but the Chapel of All Saints and the churchyard, where Alexander Hamilton is buried, will remain open throughout the project.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Financial District

88 Greenwich street, john varvatos, condos, cool listings

This elegantly designed studio in the Greenwich Club at 88 Greenwich Street belongs to Martin Dimen, who is the design director for the iconic contemporary men’s brand John Varvatos–and the home’s interiors reflect the brand’s aesthetic of masculine opulence. The Financial District condo is asking $725,000.

See more, this way

Construction Update, Financial District, Major Developments

Rendering by REX

Construction of the Ronald O. Perelman Performing Arts Center is officially moving forward, with the first pieces of the center’s structural steel now visible above street level, according to CityRealty. The idea for an arts center at the World Trade Center was included in the original vision for rebuilding the area after Sept. 11, a plan proposed nearly 15 years ago. Designed by REX, the flexible “Mystery Box” will be wrapped in translucent marble, the same material used on the Thomas Jefferson Memorial, and laminated with insulated glass. Named for Ronald O. Perelman who gifted $75 million to the project, the center will include 200,000 square feet of space, three halls and a rehearsal space, a restaurant and a gift shop.

More details here

Financial District

One world trade center, skyscrapers, tall towers, supertalls

Image courtesy of Michael Vadon’s Flickr

It was recently revealed that One World Trade Center still has a 25 percent vacancy rate four years after opening its door, and that number is about to grow. The first tenant to move into the building in 2014, Condé Nast is now looking to sublease a third of its one-million-square-foot office space. As part of its consolidation plan, the media company on Monday said it’s looking to sublease seven of the 23 floors it currently rents as a way to cut costs, according to the New York Post. It’s estimated Condé Nast paid roughly $50 per square foot when it moved in nearly four years ago–space at One WTC is now worth $75 per square foot.

Find out more

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.