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condos, Financial District, New Developments, Starchitecture, Top Stories

Wall Street Tower, David Adjaye, Lightstone Group

Three years after completing his first New York City building, an affordable housing complex in Harlem called the Sugar Hill Development, starchitect David Adjaye is back. This time, he’ll be working with David Lichtenstein’s Lightstone Group to design a 61-story, 750-foot-tall condominium in the Financial District at 130 William Street known as the Wall Street Tower. Early conceptual studies uncovered by CityRealty show a gold-trimmed prism set against rigid rows of arched windows, as well as a glimpse at what the 244 apartments and amenity spaces will look like.

See the impressive renderings

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Financial District, History

Image via Library of Congress

While the news industry today continues to shift from bustling offices to laptops in coffee shops, it may be hard to imagine that the publishing industry was at the epicenter of some of the world’s most important architectural feats. But this was the case in late 19th century New York City, when the daily newspaper industry was centered at Park Row, near City Hall. Such institutions included The New York Times, The New York Tribune and The New York World. 

Take a trip back in time with us and explore Newspaper Row

Financial District, New Developments

80 south street tower, city planning commission, air rights

After a long-planned but never executed plan to develop buildings at 80 South Street and 163 Front Street in the South Street Seaport, the site’s owner has officially filed demolition permits at both buildings, Curbed learned. As 6sqft previously covered, the Howard Hughes Corporation sold 80 South Street to China Oceanwide Holdings for $390 million last March. Although the developer hasn’t released construction plans yet, the building is expected to be 113 stories tall, reaching an impressive 1,436 feet (to give you an idea of just how tall this is, 432 Park is 1,396 feet tall, and One World Trade Center is 1,368 feet tall by roof height).

More details ahead

Cool Listings, Financial District, Interiors

This two-bedroom Financial District condo is owned by Rishi Bali, co-founder with his sister of the yoga apparel and lifestyle company YogaSmoga. (The two grew up near yoga ashrams in northern India.) This is not only a unique apartment, located in the Downtown by Starck development at 15 Broad Street, it’s also a unique listing. The apartment sale includes all the furnishings, meaning customized pieces from designers like Poltrona Frau, Philippe Starck, and Mooi. There are even more perks, like customized built-ins and a custom in-home audio and video system. After Bali purchased the pad in 2006 for $875,695, it’s now listed for $1.7 million.

Take a look

Cool Listings, Financial District, Interiors

This FiDi duplex was designed to impress. Location within a historic brick townhouse at 150 Beekman Street, the interior of the apartment has been completely modernized. You might say the apartment offers the best of both worlds: cobblestone streets and a historic facade, as well as a modern, open layout with luxury finishes throughout the interior. For five bedrooms, four bathrooms and 3,232 square feet, it is now asking $5.795 million.

Take a deeper look

Art, Financial District

The creator of the iconic Wall Street “Charging Bull” is snorting mad over the appearance of the bull’s new companion, artist Kristen Visbal’s bronze “Fearless Girl” statue. 76-year-old Arturo di Modica, the artist who made the iconic sculpture that, like its young challenger, was installed in the wee hours, says the girl is “an advertising trick,” reports MarketWatch.

Find out more

Art, Financial District

Image: Melanie Hunt via Instagram
Early Tuesday morning a bronze statue of a young girl in high tops, face defiant, hands firmly on her hips, was placed in front of the iconic charging bull statue in lower Manhattan’s Bowling Green park. The statue, created by artist Kristen Visbal, was installed by international asset management company State Street Global Advisors (SSGA) to bring attention to the need for more women on corporate boards–and for more female business leaders in general.

What’s behind the girl

Featured Story

Features, History

george washington, donald trump, inauguration

As Washington, D.C. attempts to rein in the crowds on this Inauguration Day, New Yorkers can be thankful someone else is dealing with the traffic snarls for a change. We’re guessing, though, that if Donald Trump had any say on the matter, New York City would be hosting the inauguration as it did for the nation’s first president in 1789.

Some other ways times have really changed

History

While paper might be becoming a thing of the past, it’s often the one thing that remains of our recorded history. And while it was often our sole means of recording that history, paper is among the most difficult media to preserve. To that end, New York City’s painstakingly stacked, filed and boxed New York Supreme Court records, part of an immense collection of official documents dating back as far as 1674, are being moved from the archival homes they’ve occupied for, in some cases, centuries. The New York Times reports on a heroic effort by dedicated archivists to round up the these city records in order to preserve them for posterity and make them more accessible to researchers.

From early immigration papers to Aaron Burr’s divorce

Architecture, condos, Construction Update, Financial District, New Developments, Starchitecture

Rafael Viñoly Architects, 125 Greenwich Street, Financial District towers, Michael Shvo

Construction at Rafael Viñoly’s slender skyscraper 125 Greenwich Street has reached street level, but as CityRealty uncovered, the tower that was slated to be taller than 1,000 feet over the summer (and previously 1,400 feet), is back down to 898 feet. Though this now makes it shorter than Fumihiko Maki’s 977-foot 4 World Trade Center one block north, fresh renderings show that the 88-story condo will still offer sweeping views of the city and harbor, which are shown for the first time from interior shots.

More views and details ahead

Financial District, History

the great fire of 1835, history,

It’s hard to envision blocks and blocks of Lower Manhattan being destroyed by a raging fire, but that’s exactly what happened there 181 years ago to the day, December 16th, 1835. That year marks one of New York’s most traumatic fires in history, known as the Great Fire of 1835. It came at a time the city was developing rapidly, with the arrival of new businesses, railroad terminals, and people. But there were also major concerns that came with the city’s boom: there was a lack of a reliable water source for the city, and there were not enough fire departments to keep everyone safe. And so the forces collided into a traumatic fire that would change the course of New York’s development significantly.

Keep reading for more

Cool Listings, Financial District, Interiors

40 Broad Street, Setai, Cool listing, condo, furnished condo for rent, rentals, views, water views, husdon river views, chandelier, murano, sauna, pool table, fidi, financial district

This 3,500-square-foot penthouse atop the Setai Wall Street at 40 Broad Street in the Financial District is a stunning home by NYC standards, but the condominium also includes a world tour’s worth of collected fixtures. The two-bedroom penthouse belongs to Alex Birkenstock–scion of the trendy-crunchy European sandal family–who bought the posh pad in 2011 for just under $6 million. An attempt was made in 2104 to sell the apartment for $13 million as 6sqft previously reported. But even after being eventually chopped to $9 million, the pad still doesn’t appear to have changed hands. Now it’s for rent for $19,995 a month, amazing spin-the-compass collections and all. For starters, there’s a 1,000-pound steel and brass safe bought from the Bank of France…

Take the tour

Architecture, Financial District, New Developments

74 trinity place, Trinity Church Wall Street, Pelli Clarke Pelli, Trinity Church tower

Trinity Church Wall Street was built in 1846 by Richard Upjohn and is considered one of the first and best examples of Neo-Gothic architecture in the entire country. But behind its historic steeple, which made it the city’s tallest building until 1890, will soon rise a modern, 26-story, mixed-use tower. The Wall Street Journal reports that Trinity has revealed its design for a Pelli Clarke Pelli-designed building, which will be linked to the church by a foot bridge over Trinity Place. The new 310,000-square-foot structure will house the Trinity Church Parish Center at its base, along with a cafe, gymnasium, flexible space for classrooms or art/music studios, and church offices. Above the Center, on floors 10 through 26, will be commercial office space

More details ahead

Architecture, Financial District

One World Trade Center sky lobby, Gensler, One World Trade Center

Tenants at One World Trade Center who occupy floors above 65 are required to change elevators at the 64th floor. When the building opened its doors two summers ago, the Durst Organization noticed that these elevator banks became a natural mingling area, and so decided to forego plans to make the space into offices and instead keep it open as an open sky lobby. Commercial Observer got a first look at renderings of the commons designed by Gensler, whose principal and design director Tom Vecchione referred to it as “a shared piazza for the entire building.” In addition to a cafe, it will offer a game room and a 180-person meeting room that can be split into two or host fitness and yoga classes.

More renderings and details ahead

Battery Park City, City Living, Financial District, South Street Seaport

nyc singles

A report released Monday by the Downtown Alliance shows that the area south of Chambers Street in lower Manhattan is chock full of young New Yorkers with plenty of disposable income; the development advocacy group hopes the news will result in the creation of more options for them to spend it. Crains reports on the survey, which found that 60 percent of apartments in a growing residential sector that includes the Financial District, Battery Park City and the South Street Seaport are home to single tenants and roommates with no children, one of the highest concentrations of young singles–defined as 18- to 44-year-olds, in the city. This spendy demo hits the town every other night on average, blowing about $1,000 a month, adding up to $356 million a year. But according to the report, half of that is spent in other neighborhoods due to a lack of “appealing options” in the area.

Tap a keg, stat

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