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Battery Park City, Financial District, Green Design, Policy, South Street Seaport

Lower Manhattan Resiliency, de Blasio, climate change nyc

Via Mayor Bill de Blasio’s office

Mayor Bill de Blasio unveiled on Thursday a $10 billion plan to extend the coastline of Lower Manhattan as much as 500 feet to protect from future floods. The Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency project is the result of a study that looked at ways to build resilience in low-lying neighborhoods like the Financial District and South Street Seaport. The study found the only feasible measure for these areas would be extending the shoreline about two city blocks into the East River by adding a new piece of land at or above 20 feet from current sea level.

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Financial District, Policy

Sketch of Nassau and Beekman Streets as slow streets; via FDNA

A neighborhood association is calling for safer streets and sidewalks for pedestrians walking through Manhattan’s Financial District. In a report released on Tuesday by the Financial District Neighborhood Association (FDNA), “Make Way for Lower Manhattan,” the group calls for making the neighborhood a “slow street” district that would require cars to share space with pedestrians in an area stretching roughly between the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge and Battery Park.

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condos, Construction Update, Financial District, New Developments

Current views of 125 Greenwich Street at its full height. Photos courtesy of Field Condition.

Situated at the northwest corner of Thames Street, just south of the World Trade Center and northwest of Wall Street, Bizzi & Partners Development’s condo tower at 125 Greenwich Street has officially topped out at 912 feet. Designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects, the firm behind 432 Park Avenue, the building will offer some of the highest apartments in the Financial District. Upon completion later this year, the 88-story tower will house 273 residences.

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Construction Update, Financial District, New Developments, Starchitecture

2 World Trade Center, BIG, Bjarke Ingels, NYC starchitecture

Rendering of 2 World Center via DBOX, courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group

Silverstein Properties, Inc. chairman Larry Silverstein has said construction may begin on the final World Trade Center tower before a committed tenant signs a lease, Bloomberg reports. Following work on the building’s foundation, the developer was waiting to progress with further work until a lease was signed. But optimism about the economy and strong leasing progress at neighboring towers may mean the building might rise “on spec.” The 2.8 million-square-foot office tower, designed by Bjarke Ingels Group, will be the last of Silverstein’s four skyscrapers to occupy the site.

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Design, Financial District, Museums

9/11 Memorial, Memorial Glade, 9/11 toxins, MOSO Studio, 9/11 post-attack victims

Rendering by Moso Studio.

As 6sqft previously reported, after the rescue and recovery effort for the September 11th attacks ended, an estimated 400,000 people were exposed to life-threatening toxins, and since then, nearly 70,000 first responders and more than 14,000 survivors enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Program. Last May, 9/11 Memorial & Museum president Alice Greenwald revealed the official design for Memorial Glade, a monument to all those who have lost their lives or are sick due to these related illnesses. The New York Post now reports that work is underway at Liberty and West streets.

Find out more about Memorial Glade

Financial District, Restaurants

Huge food and music complex coming to FiDi’s 28 Liberty

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, January 22, 2019

one chase manhattan plaza, 28 Liberty street, david rockefeller, fosun, food hall, music venue, fidi

Image: Wikimedia Commons

A massive new venue will be serving up food and entertainment on the ground floor of 28 Liberty Street–originally named One Chase Manhattan Plaza–the New York Post reports. Legends Hospitality will be opening a 35,000-square-foot space, designed by noted architect Jeffrey Beers, that will feature live music and a restaurant. The property’s historic Noguchi rock garden will be incorporated into the new venue.

Food, music, film, this way

Events, Financial District, Upper West Side 

women's march on nyc

2017 Women’s March on NYC; image: mathiaswasik via Flickr.

The streets of NYC will fill once again this Saturday, January 19 for the third annual Women’s March on New York City. The first march took place in 2017, as a demonstration in support of women’s rights and in resistance to a growing list of gender-related injustices during the inauguration of President Donald Trump. Last year’s march drew an estimated 200,000 participants. As with any jubilant mass display of human resilience, there will be street closings. Read on for info on where to march, how to avoid traffic snarls and what makes this year’s march different.

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Financial District, History

Federal Hall, George Washington statue

Photo of Federal Hall and the George Washington statue, via John Schiller/Flickr cc 

Right now, Federal Hall at Wall and Broad Streets is closed due to the Government Shutdown. But long before the current crisis, Federal Hall was the site of several Federal firsts. New York was the nation’s first capital, a distinction the city held until 1790, and the original Federal Hall, at the site of today’s monument, was the first Capital Building. Federal Hall hosted the first Congress, Supreme Court, and Executive Branch Offices. The building witnessed the drafting of the Bill of Rights and the passage of the Northwest Ordinance. George Washington took his Oath of Office from the balcony of Federal Hall on April 30, 1789, and on January 8, 1790, he delivered the nation’s very first State of the Union Address from the building’s Senate Chamber.

What were the hot-button issues of 1790?

Battery Park City, Construction Update, Financial District

Photo courtesy of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America

Last December, construction on the St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church at the World Trade Center stopped due to lack of funding. The Archdiocese has remained committed to finishing the construction of the church, which was destroyed during the 9/11 attacks. Recently, the Port Authority — who owns the land on which the church is sited at Liberty Street — said that it wants to help the church with its rebuilding efforts, as the New York Post first reported.

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Featured Story

Features, Financial District, History, holidays

Ringing in the New Year via NYC Parks

Every year on December 31st, the eyes of the world turn to Times Square. In fact, New Yorkers, and revelers worldwide have been ringing in the New Year from 42nd Street since 1904, when Adolf Ochs christened the opening of the New York Times building on what was then Longacre Square with a New Years celebration complete with midnight fireworks. In 1907, Ochs began dropping a ball from the flagpole of the Times tower, and a tradition for the ages was set in motion.

But long before Adolf Ochs and his proclivity for pyrotechnics, New Yorkers had been ringing in the New Year with traditions both dignified and debauched. From the George Washington and the old Dutch custom of “Calling,” to the rancorous tooting of tin horns, one thing is clear, New York has always gone to town for the New Year.

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