Search Result for forest hills

Dancing Pumpkin, Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts and David Zwirner

This Saturday, April 10, the New York Botanical Garden’s hotly-anticipated exhibit KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature will open to the public and remain on view through October 31, 2021. The blockbuster show dedicated to legendary Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama was originally planned to open in May 2020, but of course, was postponed due to the pandemic. Among the works on view are Kusama’s famous polka-dot pumpkins, her larger-than-life flowers, and the famous Narcissus Garden, composed of 1,400 stainless steel spheres floating on water.

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The best spots for bird watching in New York City

By Devin Gannon, Mon, April 5, 2021

Birdwatching in Prospect Park, courtesy of the Prospect Park Alliance on Flickr

With hundreds of parks and over 500 miles of waterfront, New York City is an excellent place for bird watching. The five boroughs serve as a temporary and permanent home to over 400 species of bird, thanks to both habitat diversity and location on the Atlantic Flyway, the route birds follow during migrations. From Pelham Bay Park in the northeast Bronx down to Great Kills Park on the South Shore of Staten Island, there is no shortage of birding activities in New York. With spring migration underway, we’ve rounded up the best places to find feathered friends throughout the city, most of which are accessible via public transportation. For guided bird watching tours and walks, check out events from NYC Parks, NYC Audubon, and the Linnaean Society of New York.

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17 spots to go sledding in New York City

By Devin Gannon, Thu, February 11, 2021

Photo of Owl’s Head Park in Bay Ridge courtesy of NYC Parks/ Daniel Avila

Sledding has long been a New York City pastime during the long winter months, thanks to the many hills and slopes found in parks across the five boroughs. With an already impressive season of snow upon us, it’s the perfect chance to escape your apartment and get some fresh air and winter fun. Ahead, find the best places to go sledding in every borough, from scenic Sunset Park in Brooklyn to the natural rolling hills of Manhattan’s Inwood Hill Park.

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6SQFT’S TOP STORIES OF 2020!

By Dana Schulz, Wed, December 30, 2020

Like it was for everyone, 2020 was challenging for team 6sqft. We started working from home, we stopped being out and about in our beloved city, and we shifted our coverage to keep our readers up-to-date on the ever-evolving pandemic. But there were also a lot of silver linings. We helped our fellow New Yorkers get the info they needed, while also providing a welcome escape through our cool listings column and upbeat guides. Ahead, see which stories you read the most this year, from tracking COVID cases and antibody rates by zip code to outdoor dining and hiking guides to celebrity real estate and a castle for sale.

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New “yellow zone” maps for Queens’ clusters; Courtesy of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office

The state will loosen some restrictions in coronavirus clusters in parts of Brooklyn and Queens after positive infection rates decreased, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced on Wednesday. As a way to contain the spread of the virus in hot spots across New York, the state earlier this month divided the clusters into three categories depending on positivity rates, with red, orange, and yellow zones determining the level of restrictions. According to Cuomo, all clusters in Queens can exit the red zone and enter yellow, meaning businesses and schools can reopen and houses of worship can increase capacity to 50 percent. But in Brooklyn, the red zone will remain red, with orange and yellow zones now both yellow.

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Map of Brooklyn’s Covid-19 cluster; courtesy of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Office

In an effort to contain new clusters of the coronavirus, Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Tuesday ordered non-essential businesses to close and houses of worship to restrict capacity in parts of Brooklyn and Queens and suburbs of New York City. The new initiative divides the clusters into three categories depending on the rate of transmission, with red, orange, and yellow zones determining the level of restrictions in place. The new rules will be in effect for a minimum of 14 days starting on Thursday. To clear up confusion over the cluster zones, the city released a searchable “Find Your Zone” map that allows New Yorkers to enter their address to find what zone they live, work, and go to school in.

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Map data © 2020 Google

One of the thousands of small businesses struggling to make ends meet in New York City’s pandemic world is Williamsburg’s Kellogg’s Diner, which has been in business since the 1940s. The 24-hour restaurant at the corner of Metropolitan and Union Avenues says it’s in danger of closing if the city doesn’t increase its indoor dining capacity from 25 to 50 percent. Referring to the fact that restaurants in the rest of the state are able to operate at half capacity, owner Irene Siderakis told Pix 11, “Why is it fair for them and not for us? I don’t understand. I don’t get it.”

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Rockwell Group’s DineOut NYC in Manhattan’s Chinatown; Photo courtesy of Emily Andrews for Rockwell Group

Even as the city prepares to resume indoor dining this month, more restaurants will be able to take advantage of the program that allows expanded street and sidewalk seating. Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week seven new locations for outdoor dining on open streets across the five boroughs, bringing the total to 87 streets and nine pedestrian plazas designated for restaurant use on weekends. The latest batch of outdoor dining streets will be overseen by a number of neighborhood restaurants, including Gertie’s in Williamsburg, Kheo-Yo in Tribeca, Ray’s Bar on the Lower East Side, and others.

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Photo looking south on open West End Avenue, taken by 6sqft on 5.16.20

New York City will add 23 new miles of open streets, bringing the total to roughly 67 miles of streets closed to cars citywide, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Wednesday. When the mayor first announced the program, he committed to opening 100 miles of streets throughout the pandemic. “This is going to be great for people looking for a break this summer with all the things going on, a place for kids to exercise and run around,” the mayor said during a press conference. “It’s growing, and we’re going to keep adding to it.”

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35+ black-owned restaurants in NYC by borough

By Devin Gannon, Wed, June 10, 2020

Photo by Ajay Suresh on Flickr

The Black Lives Matter movement continues to grow in New York City and across the country, with many people looking to get involved, whether it’s donating to antiracist organizations or studying the history of the black experience in America. Another direct action New Yorkers can take to support the black community today is shopping at black-owned businesses. Lists and guides have popped up online in the last few weeks to bring attention to these mom and pop shops, with detailed resources from Black-Owned Brooklyn and this spreadsheet created by New Yorker food critic Hannah Goldfield. The app Eat Okra, which launched three years ago, is also a helpful resource that highlights most of the black-owned restaurants in NYC, which according to Eater, includes more than 2,500 restaurants. Ahead, we break down some of the best black-owned restaurants, cafes, and bars in every borough. It is no means a comprehensive list and we encourage our readers to share with us additional places to include.

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