open streets

Policy, Restaurants

Photo by almapapi on Pixabay

The New York City Council is set to introduce legislation on Thursday that requires the city to use open space for outdoor dining during the coronavirus pandemic. Restaurants and bars have now been closed for in-person service for over two months because of the state’s “pause” order that shuttered all nonessential businesses. And while takeout and delivery options remain available, the restaurant industry has taken a tremendous hit, with many longtime restaurants forced to close permanently.

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City Living, Transportation

Photo looking south on open West End Avenue, taken by 6sqft on 5.16.20

In his press conference this morning, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that the city is adding 13 more miles of open streets, bringing the total across the boroughs to 45 miles and exceeding his goal of opening 40 miles by the end of May. After stating that this is the largest amount of protected streets in the nation, he assured New Yorkers that “it won’t stop there.” When the mayor first announced the program, he committed to opening 100 miles of streets throughout the pandemic. The latest batch will open tomorrow and includes tons of park-adjacent streets across Queens and the first open streets in Greenwich Village and Red Hook.

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City Living, Policy, Transportation

NYC opens 12 more miles of open streets

By Dana Schulz, Wed, May 13, 2020

Photo courtesy of NYC DOT/Flickr

This brings the total to nearly 21 miles since Mayor de Blasio first announced that he’d be opening up 40 miles of streets to pedestrians by the end of the month, with an ultimate goal of 100 miles throughout the current COVID crisis. In his press conference this morning, the mayor announced the third round of open streets totaling 11.7 miles would be opening tomorrow, along with 9.2 miles of protected bike lanes by the end of May. Some of the new open streets include those in Hudson Yards, the first on the Upper West Side and in Long Island City, and those adjacent to seven more parks in Brooklyn.

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City Living, Policy, Transportation

Photo courtesy of NYC DOT on Flickr

After finally getting on board with the idea of opening New York City streets to pedestrians, Mayor de Blasio closed the first wave of streets to cars earlier this week. This totaled 4.5 miles inside parks and 2.7 miles adjacent to parks; eventually, the city will open up to 100 miles of streets. The next group will open up tomorrow, which includes 1.5 miles in Manhattan, Brooklyn, and the Bronx done in collaboration with Business Improvement Districts (BIDs), as well as 0.4 miles in Jackson Heights, Queens.

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City Living, Policy, Transportation

Photo courtesy of NYC DOT on Flickr

The first phase of the city’s plan to close up to 100 miles of streets to cars will start on Monday, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Friday. The first streets to open to pedestrians include 4.5 miles inside parks and 2.7 miles adjacent to parks, according to the mayor. “The goal here is more space, more social distancing,” de Blasio said.

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Policy, Transportation

NYC to open up to 100 miles of streets for pedestrians

By Devin Gannon, Mon, April 27, 2020

Photo courtesy of NYC DOT/ Flickr

The city will open 40 miles of streets for pedestrians over the next month with the goal of opening up to 100 miles for the duration of the coronavirus pandemic, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Monday. During a press briefing, the mayor said an agreement had been reached with the City Council, which had introduced “open streets” legislation last week and planned to move forward with or without City Hall approval. The plan also includes adding temporary protected bike lanes and expanding some sidewalks.

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Policy

The city’s “Summer Streets” program in 2019; Photo of NYC DOT on Flickr

Up to 75 miles of city streets could soon be closed to cars under new legislation set to be introduced by the City Council next week. Speaker Corey Johnson and Council Member Carlina Rivera on Friday announced a proposal to open streets to pedestrians and cyclists during the coronavirus pandemic to allow for proper social distancing. The plan comes after Mayor Bill de Blasio launched an open-streets pilot last month, only to end the program 10 days later.

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Policy, Transportation

Photo of 2019 Summer Streets, courtesy of NYC DOT/Flickr

Pointing to an overuse of NYPD personnel as the main reason, Mayor de Blasio said in his press conference on Sunday that he would not be extending the Safe Streets pilot that he launched 10 days ago. The program closed one six-block stretch of road to vehicles in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx in order to provide more open space for pedestrians. But despite continued overcrowding in parks, the Mayor has decided the resources used to keep the streets open are better allocated elsewhere.

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City Living, Policy, Transportation

Photo courtesy of NYC DOT/Flickr

After receiving pressure from both Governor Cuomo and City Council Speaker Corey Johnson to close some streets to vehicular traffic in an effort to give New Yorkers more outdoor space to exercise, Mayor de Blasio finally launched a Safe Streets pilot from Friday, March 27, to Monday, March 30 that included a roughly six-block stretch in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx, totaling 1.6 miles of the city’s 6,000 miles of roads. Today, the Mayor’s office announced that they’ll be extending the pilot program through Sunday, April 5th with the same hours of 10am-7pm.

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