maps

infographic, maps

The New York City greater metropolitan area is home to over a million service members, veterans and their families. To provide an idea of just how many veterans call the city home–and how diverse a community they are– the New York City Department of Veterans’ Services has compiled a set of maps using the most recently available data from the American Community Survey and the US Department of Veterans Affairs.

Maps and more info, this way

History, maps, Transportation

The 1904 map via Martayan Lan Gallery

New Yorkers have used maps to navigate the city’s subway system since the first year the system opened 114 years ago. And one of only two known examples of the Interborough Rapid Transit’s first guide is for sale for $12,000, the New York Times reported. That 1904 transit guide, along with many more historic maps of New York, can be found at the Martayan Lan Gallery, which is kicking of its  “New Amsterdam to Metropolis: Historic Maps of  New York City 1548-1964” exhibit on Nov. 9.

More this way

Featured Story

Events, Features, maps

Whether you’re good and ready for sweater weather or you’re sorry to see summer go, there’s no avoiding the fact that fall is on the way. One way to savor the changing seasons is to enjoy the majestic hues of autumn foliage. If you’re hoping to catch the changing season at its peak, there’s no better tool to plan your leaf-peeping strategy than SmokyMountains.com‘s Fall Foliage Prediction Map. This interactive infograph will tell you when and where foliage is expected to appear, and when it will reach its peak, in your area.

Check out the map

maps

The Department of City Planning (DCP) launched on Monday a digital tool that compiles more than 8,000 historic maps of New York City, dating back to 1924. The tool, called NYC Street Map, allows users to find the official mapped width and status of specific streets and how that relates to specific properties. According to DCP, NYC Street Map lets New Yorkers explore historic street and building images, find protected bike lanes and locate streets and public areas named in honor of 9/11 victims.

Explore the map

maps, Restaurants

Not only are New Yorkers eating at all hours of the day, they’re also posting photos of the grub on Instagram. An animated map from Crimson Hexagon dubbed “Bites of the Big Apple” displays all of the food-related posts on Instagram published over a 24-hour period across the five boroughs. Not surprisingly, the number of photos of fried chicken, burgers and pizza increased after midnight, with snapshots of salads most prevalent around lunch time. And proving NYC is the city that never sleeps, photos of coffee were popular at every hour.

Explore it here

Landmarks Preservation Commission, maps

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) on Wednesday launched a new interactive web map that displays applications and permits for work on individual, interior and scenic landmarks, as well as buildings in historic districts. Permit Application Finder users can search by community district and work type, allowing the public to see geographically where LPC has issued permits for the first time.

“LPC reviews and approves thousands of permit applications for work on designated properties each year, and with this map, information on all of these projects is just a click away,” LPC Chair Meenakshi Srinivasan said in a statement. “It is an excellent example of how we are leveraging technology to make our regulatory process more efficient and transparent.”

More details here

maps, Restaurants

women's history, grubhub

What could go better together than feminism and food delivery? Thanks to Grubhub, the online takeout service, hungry New Yorkers can now easily order from women-run restaurants. The company on Tuesday launched an app called RestaurantHER that aims to empower and promote women chefs and owners, who are often underrepresented and underpaid in the restaurant industry. Available nationwide, the app includes a map that looks similar to Grubhub’s typical page, but only highlights restaurants owned or co-owned by a woman or a kitchen led by a woman executive chef.

Learn more

History, maps

Explore 1980s NYC street by street with this interactive map

By Michelle Cohen, Fri, September 15, 2017

The East Village in the 1980s

From Broadway to Bowery, 1980s New York City was a very different place compared to today’s manicured metropolis. Courtesy of Maps Mania, the 80s.NYC street map picks up where the Finance Department of New York City left off. In the mid ‘80s the bureau photographed every single building in the five boroughs in order to accurately assess building taxes and estimate property taxes. Brandon Liu and Jeremy Lechtzin have finessed this trove of photographic information into a nifty map that allows users to travel the city’s streets in the bad old 1980s with a map-based street view for an easy-to-browse glimpse of the streetscape 30 years ago. You can browse by location by clicking anywhere on the map for vintage street views on that spot, or type in an address. For more context there are curated “stories” that provide historical background where it’s available (and interesting).

Check out the map

Events, maps

The temperature is falling, the air is brisk, and the kids are heading back to school. This can only mean one thing: Autumn is upon us. While you may lament the end of days spent sunning beachside, don’t forget that sweater weather brings with it a bounty of fiery colors. If you’re hoping to catch the changing season in all its beauty, there’s no better tool to plan your leaf peeping expedition than SmokeyMountains.com‘s Fall Foliage Map. This handy interactive cartograph will tell you when and where foliage is expected to appear, and more importantly, when it will peak in your area.

try the map out

Manhattan, maps

Tall buildings—from supertalls to garden-variety skyscrapers—seem to grow like weeds in New York City: A recent boom in tall Midtown residential towers has ushered in a new focus on life in the clouds. And we’re always comparing ourselves to other vertical cities. We also know there have been growth cycles and slower periods when it comes to the city’s skyscrapers. Now we can survey the landscape of Manhattan’s tallest buildings all at once thanks to the mapping wizards at Esri (via Maps Mania). The Manhattan Skyscraper Explorer reveals each of the city’s tall towers, showing its height, when it was built, what it’s used for and more.

Explore New York’s tallest

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