South Street Seaport

affordable housing, Major Developments, New Developments, South Street Seaport

All renderings courtesy of The Howard Hughes Corporation/SOM

The Howard Hughes Corporation on Thursday unveiled its latest effort to redevelop the South Street Seaport neighborhood. The $1.4 billion proposal includes the construction of two 470-foot towers which would contain rentals, condos, and office space on a parking lot at 250 Water Street. Initial plans from the developer called for a single tower that would rise nearly 1,000 feet, but local residents and Community Board 1 opposed it. Designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, the two towers would include 360 units, with at least 100 apartments set aside for families earning 40 percent of the area median income. It would be the first affordable housing built in the community under the city’s Mandatory Inclusionary Housing program.

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Cool Listings, South Street Seaport

Listing photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

One of the fun things about New York City’s architecture is how hidden its history can be. Take for example 130 Beekman Street in the South Street Seaport Historic District. The five-story building was actually built in 1798, but it’s undergone several renovations over the years, and its condo units are completely modern. Just listed for $3,995,000 is the building’s crown jewel, a three-bedroom, top-floor loft with two beautiful outdoor spaces.

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Design, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Restaurants, South Street Seaport

View from John Street Rendering courtesy of Woods Bagot/ NYC Parks

An open-air waterfront restaurant and bar could be coming to the South Street Seaport Historic District. The Howard Hughes Corporation and the city’s Parks Department on Tuesday presented a proposal to the Landmarks Preservation Commission for a new concession along the East River Esplanade under the FDR Drive overpass. Designed by Woods Bagot, the “Blockhouse Bar” would be a year-round establishment, with plans to add decking over the pavement, planters, and vinyl coverings during the winter months.

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Cool Listings, South Street Seaport

265 Water Street, South Street Seaport loft

The listing says this loft at 265 Water Street in the South Street Seaport is in “first generation” condition, which is definitely apparent from the weathered wooden beams and columns and original maple floors. The historic details and wide-open layout are the perfect backdrops for eclectic furnishings and funky art, making this $1,395,000 co-op a rare find.

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Art, South Street Seaport

wave field, seaport, pier 17, public art

All photos courtesy of Wagstaff New York/The Howard Hughes Corportation

As 6sqft shared last week, The Garment District Alliance unveiled its latest public art installation, a collection of 12 oversized, illuminated seesaws titled “Impulse,” that emit various sounds as New Yorkers play on them. If you’re looking for even more giant interactive seesaws, you’re in luck: Wave-Field is now lighting up the lower Manhattan night. Now through the end of March, you’ll find the installation of illuminated musical seesaws at Seaport Square next to Pier 17.

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Events, South Street Seaport

Photo courtesy of The Howard Hughes Corporation

Ice skating in New York City is a must during the winter, with spots like the festive rink at Rockefeller Center, Bryant Park’s winter village, and even newbie Runway Rink at the landmarked TWA Hotel. But there’s only one NYC ice rink where you can “skate the skyline.” Returning for a second season, The Rooftop at Pier 17 in the Seaport District opens this week, promising an even more spectacular season of skating as the city’s only open-air rooftop rink.

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Art, Green Design, South Street Seaport

Rendering of + POOL Light. Designed by PlayLab and Family New York. Image courtesy Friends of + POOL

Designed by PLAYLAB, INC. and Family New York in collaboration with Floating Point, a new project from the team behind the +POOL concept makes it possible for anyone to visualize water conditions in NYC’s Harbor using a light installation and an interactive website. The 50-foot x 50-foot plus-shaped “+POOL Light” is installed at the Seaport District at Lower Manhattan’s Pier 17, continuously changing color based on the condition of the water in which it floats, from great for swimming to not-so-great. The installation debuted last night and will be on view until January 3rd.

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Featured Story

Features, History, South Street Seaport

Bowne & Co. Stationers today, via Flickr cc

Bowne & Co. Stationers, which the South Street Seaport Museum bills as the city’s “oldest operating business under the same name,” has been a presence in Lower Manhattan since 1775. That year, Robert Bowne opened a dry goods and stationery store at 39 Queen Street. Following the American Revolution, Bowne & Co. grew along with the Port of New York, providing the advertising, stationary, and financial printing that made it possible for life and commerce at the port to function and thrive. Because New York’s printers were responsible for printing everything from stock certificates to tugboat notices, steamship broadsides to cargo invoices, fishmongers’ business cards to bankers’ prospectuses, the industry helped the city emerge as the world’s busiest port, and its preeminent financial center.

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Events, holidays, South Street Seaport

Image via Wiki Commons

For the first time in five years, Macy’s has moved its July 4th fireworks display to the Brooklyn Bridge, along with four barges that will launch pyrotechnics off the shore of the South Street Seaport’s Pier 17. The Pier, recently redeveloped by the Howard Hughes Corporation and designed by SHoP Architects, consists of food and drink options, retail, and a rooftop entertainment complex, all of which is supposed to be publicly accessible during operating hours according to a deal with the city. However, as Gothamist first reported, the only ways to check out the fireworks from Piers 16 and 17 are to drop $500 on a ticket to a party at Jean Georges’ restaurant The Fulton, be cool enough to land on the VIP list for a party atop Pier 17, or have scored one of just 300 community spots on the Seaport’s Wavertree ship (registration closed today at noon).

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Featured Story

Features, History, South Street Seaport

“Banana Docks, New York” c. 1906. Via The Library of Congress

If you’ve ever grabbed a bushel of bananas at your corner bodega, then you’ve nabbed a few of the 20 million bananas distributed around NYC every week. Today, our bananas dock at small piers in Red Hook, or, more often, make the journey by truck from Delaware. But, from the late 19th century until well into the 20th, New York was a major banana port, and banana boats hauled their cargo to the city’s bustling Banana Docks on the piers at Old Slip.

Surveying that cargo in August 1897, The New York Times wrote that the banana trade thrived in New York year-round, but the bulk of bananas hit the five boroughs between March and September. “They are brought to New York in steamers, carrying from 15,000 to 20,000 bunches…There is quite a fleet of small steamers engaged almost exclusively in the banana trade, and during the busy season many more steamers of greater size are employed.”

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