Crown Heights

affordable housing, Crown Heights, housing lotteries

It’s been over two years since ODA Architects first released a rendering of their rental project at 1040 Dean Street (formerly 608 Franklin Avenue) in Crown Heights. Featuring the firm’s signature glassy, boxy aesthetic, the eight-story, 133,582-square-foot project rose on part of the site of the shuttered Nassau Brewery, just a block away from hot-spot food hall Berg’n. Of its 120 units, 20 percent will be reserved for those earning no more than 60 percent of the area media income, and starting tomorrow, qualifying New Yorkers can apply to these affordable units, ranging from $845/month studios to $1,022 two-bedrooms.

Find out more

Crown Heights, New Developments

Google Earth rendering created by CityRealty; Image depicts the massing of the proposed buildings, not the design

Crown Heights is a neighborhood undergoing rapid change, but the western area south of Eastern Parkway has remained relatively quiet and unaltered by new development. However, it appears that could soon change. As The Real Deal reports, Cornell Realty Management is hoping to rezone two parcels at 40 Crown Street and 931 Carroll Street, just one block from the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, to make way for a pair of towers that would house more than 500 residential units.

more here

Crown Heights, From Our Partners, gentrification

Even before it opened its doors, the new tavern on Franklin Avenue in Crown Heights was under attack. The name of the place, Crow Bar, was racist, complained many residents of the neighborhood, which was once predominantly black. The residents point out that Crown Heights was known as “Crow Hill” for much of the 19th century, and that the word “crow” was used as a derogatory name for black residents who lived in the area. The controversy over the bar, which opened on September 19, has also served to underscore recent tensions related to the continuing gentrification of the area.

READ MORE AT METRO NEW YORK…

affordable housing, Crown Heights, Flatbush, housing lotteries

CAMBA Gardens Phase II, Dattner Architects, Kings County Hospital Center, Brooklyn affordable housing

Several years ago, plans were revealed for CAMBA Gardens, an affordable housing complex set to rise on the campus of the Kings County Hospital, located on the border of Crown Heights and East Flatbush. The buildings were constructed by the city’s Supportive Housing Loan Program in conjunction with non-profit CAMBA, which provides employment, education, health, legal, social, business development, and youth services to New Yorkers.

CAMBA Gardens I opened in the fall of 2013 with 209 residences spread across two buildings. Now, a lottery for CAMBA Gardens Phase II has just come online and is offering 110 newly constructed units in the LEED Gold building for individuals earning 60 percent of the AMI. These range from $822/month studios to $1,228/month three-bedrooms for households earning between $29,692 and $63,060 annually.

Find out more

affordable housing, Crown Heights, housing lotteries

505 Saint Mark's Avenue, Crown Heights rentals, NYC affordable housing, Isaac and Stern

The building itself, designed by Issac & Stern Architects, may be pretty unremarkable, the same for the block on which it’s located, but 505 Saint Mark’s Avenue is in a prime Crown Heights location and offers some great amenities. It has 147 brand new units and is just steps off foodie haven Franklin Avenue and right around the corner from trendy food/beer hall Berg’n.

While the market-rate apartments are pretty par for the course (a one-bedroom goes for about $2,500/month and a two-bedroom for around $3,600), a housing lottery has launched today for 30 affordable units, including $913 one-bedrooms and $1,065 two-bedrooms for individuals and households earning between $31,303 and $51,780 annually.

Find out if you qualify here

Crown Heights, gentrification, Video

degentrify america film

The definition of gentrification may be difficult to pin down, but filmmaker Nelson George is attempting to do so in his five-minute short “Degentrify America.” In the film, George melds together national headlines with interviews and animation to paint a picture that has become all too familiar in metropolitan areas across the country. Most notable, however, is the appearance of Crown Heights resident and co-founder of the Crown Heights Tenants Union, Donna Mossman, who speaks candidly about the evictions, injustice and other ills that come with this particular kind of change. Crown Heights recently ranked #8 on NYU’s Furman Center‘s report of New York’s 15 fastest gentrifying neighborhoods.

Watch the short film here

Architecture, Crown Heights

Miko Mercer, Brooklyn tiny house, tiny house movement

Brooklyn resident Miko Mercer, 30, joined the Tiny House Movement, and she’s done more than just take a passing interest. The New York Times recently visited Ms. Mercer and the 160-square-foot DIY dwelling she’s constructing, not on a homesteader’s plot, but inside a big Crown Heights warehouse. Mercer, who runs the skin care division at popular beauty subscription service Birchbox and draws a six-figure income, still found that, as a single person, she couldn’t afford to buy a home in a city where the average price of an apartment is $1.7 million.

She ordered a trailer bed, leased the warehouse space and got to work, designing the house herself using a 3-D modeling application called Sketchup, meticulously managing the budget using a spreadsheet. She puts the estimated cost of her tiny house at about $30,000.

Find out what’s in the plans for this tiny home

Featured Story

Crown Heights, Features, Interviews, People, real estate trends

common crown heights roommates brooklyn

What if your home was more than just a place to live? What if it took care of the tedious parts of everyday life (like cleaning, paying utility bills, and shopping for the basics) and there were always a bunch of interesting and like-minded people hanging out in your living room? Brad Hargreaves, CEO of Common, has structured his co-living housing company to be just that.

While we’ve reported on Common before (as well as WeWork’s similar new shared housing setup in FiDi), today we’re going behind the scenes at Common’s first outpost located in Crown Heights. We asked three residents why they chose to live at Common, if this catered style of co-living beats the standard New York roommate setup, and, of course, what we all really want to know—with 10 different personalities under one roof, just how “Real World” do things get?

Meet residents Jason, Kamilah and Adam here

Cool Listings, Crown Heights, Interiors

925 Pacific Street, master bedroom, hello madison, hello living, crown heights

Hello Madison is a boutique condo building that was constructed at 925 Pacific Street, in Prospect Heights, by the Brooklyn developer Hello Living. Many of the developments feature glassy, bright and lofty apartments, and this one now on the market is no exception. It’s a one bedroom that’s maximizing space with a loft built upstairs. While both the loft and the apartment downstairs are compact, double heights windows and a terrace manage to lend a feeling of spaciousness.

See more of the loft

Architecture, Crown Heights, New Developments

1736 Pacific Street Exterior

Here’s our first look at a five-story, 55-foot-tall residential building under construction in Crown Heights. The approximately 10,400-square-foot site at 1740 Pacific Street was purchased for $1.3 million in May of 2015 by Pacific Project Realty LLC and is now giving way to a 24-unit, 6,088-square-foot building. It’s being designed by Input Creative Studio, and Diego Aguilera Architects P.C. is the architect of record. The exterior, clad in red-brick with metal balconies and railings, is organized into four parts, each of which will house six units.

Get a look inside

Cool Listings, Crown Heights, Interiors

Oftentimes renting in Brooklyn means cramming into a modest apartment with roommates or building out a loft bed in a former warehouse space. You don’t typically think of sharing a massive three-story townhouse. But this historic home at 851 Park Place in Crown Heights is now on the rental market for $11,000 a month. There are eight bedrooms total (!), plenty of well-kept historic details, and extra spaces like a library and card room. Not a bad way to rent in Brooklyn.

Check it out

Featured Story

Crown Heights, Features, History, New Developments, real estate trends

crown heights north

Image via the Historic Districts Council

What once seemed unheard-of in terms of where to rent or buy in tertiary neighborhoods is now a thing of the past—be it Harlem, Williamsburg, Hell’s Kitchen, Long Island City, or the Lower East Side. But one of the best examples of rapid transformation is Brooklyn. Certainly there are many coveted communities such as Brooklyn Heights, Prospect Heights, and Park Slope, but there is another neighborhood making what looks like a very successful run at gentrification: Crown Heights.

More on the Crown Heights renaissance here

Bed Stuy, Brooklyn, Bushwick, Crown Heights, Prospect-Lefferts Gardens, real estate trends

bed stuy block and brownstones

If you’ve been looking to buy a home in Brooklyn, you’d better do it now–because townhouses under $1 million are going fast as investors and house hunters turn to the likes of Bushwick, Bed-StuyProspect-Lefferts Gardens and Crown Heights for cheap buys after being priced out of other areas in the borough. The news, which comes via DNA Info, isn’t all that surprising, as we reported just yesterday that $3 million-plus townhouses are becoming the norm in already-gentrified neighborhoods like Boerum Hill, Brooklyn Heights and Park Slope. But those mulling over whether or not to close on a home in an up-and-coming neighborhood had better make the move, because affordable townhouse listings are increasingly becoming few and far between.

Find out more here

Cool Listings, Crown Heights, Interiors, Prospect Heights

Minimalist Prospect Heights Carriage House Asks $2.5M

By Aisha Carter, Mon, January 12, 2015

474 Sterling Place, European farmhouse, modern loft

This converted carriage house in Prospect Heights is back on the market with another price drop, this time, asking $2.499 million. The minimalist 22.5-foot wide home has a touch of European farmhouse charm in a raw modern warehouse, with some vintage accents like reclaimed sinks, found antique gates, repurposed mirrored French doors and tin ceilings. Not to mention the fact that the home comes with a private garage (currently being used as an artist studio space).

Take a look inside

Featured Story

Crown Heights, Features, Interviews, Lower East Side, New Yorker Spotlight, People

macnair sillick and sandy dee hall of black tree nyc, macnair sillick, sandy dee hall, black tree nyc

Plenty of new restaurants and bars have been popping up on the Lower East Side over the last few years, but one of the more recent standout eateries to appear is Black Tree. This Brooklyn transplant has only been around for a little more than a year, but their incredible menu has drawn in everyone from food critics at the Wall Street Journal and Zagat to Guy Fieri—who by the way can be seen dusting Black Tree sandwich crumbs from his goatee in an episode of Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives.

We recently caught up with Mac Sillick and Sandy Hall, the owners and culinary creatives behind the delicious Downtown venture, to chat about their business. Find out about their “farm to sandwich” approach, why they only use locally sourced food, and why they moved their business from Crown Heights to the Lower East Side.

**GIVEAWAY**: The fellas are also offering up one lucky reader ‘drinks for two’ at the Black Tree bar. Keep reading to find out how you can enjoy some organic cocktails on the house!

The interview and giveaway here

Featured Story

Crown Heights, Features, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, People

Lillian Wright, mimosa floral design studio, crown heights flowers, floral design, chelsea flower market, new york floral arrangements, wedding florists manhattan, wedding florists brooklyn

New York is known for having spectacular weddings of all shapes and sizes at every venue imaginable. Aside from the bride, the groom and the dress, flowers are often the center of attention at these affairs. And if you have attended one such wedding, Lilli Wright’s centerpieces may have graced your table. As the owner of Mimosa Floral Design Studio based in Crown Heights, Lilli has become one of the city’s most sought after florists. She recently did the flowers for a ceremony at the New York Public Library, and on another weekend she found herself designing flowers for five different weddings.

Lilli—whose full name is Lillian—has always had a flower in her name, but it wasn’t until a friend asked the then-actress to handle flowers at a wedding that she found her true calling. After a slew of floral-related adventures throughout the city, in 2010 Lilli became a bonafide Brooklyn entrepreneur when she started a flower business right out of her apartment. In June of this year, Lilli opened up a brand new storefront studio on Kingston Avenue.

6sqft recently caught up will Lilli at her Brooklyn studio to find out more about her new shop, Crown Heights’ renaissance, and why the New York wedding scene is like no other.

Read our full interview with Lilli here

Brooklyn, Crown Heights

564 St Johns Place, Brooklyn

With its beautiful brownstones and tree-lined streets, Crown Heights was once among the city’s premier neighborhoods prior to WWII. And though much has changed in subsequent years, Heritage Equity Partners is betting on its posh roots, acquiring a controlling interest in a new development project at 564 St. John’s Place.

The deal values the property at close to $30 million and plans call for the existing parking garage to be replaced by a 130,000-square-foot residential building, most likely a rental.

Heritage has been an active buyer in Brooklyn’s hot real estate market, most recently converting a church at 163 N. Sixth St. in Williamsburg into rental apartments and a new office building at 19 Kent Ave. in the same neighborhood is in the works.

Madison Realty Capital loaned Heritage $23.5 million to make the acquisition but the total price paid to former owner Rabsky Group was not disclosed. However, Madison’s co-founder, Joshua Zegen, said his firm is in active discussions with Heritage to provide construction funding for the project.

[Via Crain’s New York]

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.