Weekly Highlights

Weekly Highlights: Top Picks from the 6sqft Staff

By Dana Schulz, Sat, October 25, 2014

Images: Greenwich Street loft via Ghislaine Viñas (L); Woolworth Building detail via Library of Congress (R)

Architecture, Features, History

Image © NewYorkitecture

Glazed terra cotta (a clay-based ceramic) became a popular architectural material in the United States between the late 1800′s and 1930′s thanks to being sturdy, relatively inexpensive, fireproof, and easily molded into ornamented detail. Plus, it was easy to make it look like granite or limestone, much more expensive materials.

Terra cotta really took off when some of Chicago and New York’s great architects, Cass Gilbert, Louis Sullivan, and Daniel H. Burnham, incorporated the material in to their most famous works such as the Woolworth Building, Bayard-Condict Building, and Flatiron Building, respectively. Additionally, Rafael Guastavino adorned many of the great Beaux-Arts masterpieces with his famous terra cotta tiled vaults.

There are countless buildings in New York City that owe their elegance to glazed terra cotta, and we’ve put together a list of some of our favorites.

Explore terra cotta in NYC

Financial District, Major Developments, Starchitecture

Remember those jitters you’d get leading up to college move-in day? We wonder if Condé Nast is feeling that way in anticipation of its big move into One World Trade Center, now set for November 3rd. The tower’s anchor tenant will not make a big to-do of its move, but the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is planning a celebratory event later in the month following the fall elections. The exact date will be determined based on Governor Cuomo’s and Governor Christie’s availability.

The official open date of the city’s tallest building comes more than nine years after ground was first broken. Though Condé Nast will begin relocating its offices next month, it will not complete the move until January. Other tenants include Morgan Stanley, Legends Hospitality, and BMB Group.

[Via Metropolis]

Features, Hell's Kitchen, Midtown, New Yorker Spotlight, People

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655 11th Avenue, New York, NY, United States

Scott with his father

Tucked away on the second floor of a building on 11th Avenue and 48th street is City Knickerbocker, Inc., a small lighting business with a long history. Founded in 1906 founded by Adolph Liroff, a Russian immigrant whose trade was converting gasoliers and sconces to electric lamps, this business has lasted for four generations. Today, Scott Liroff, Adolph’s great-grandson, proudly carries on the family tradition serving as City Knickerbocker’s Vice President.

To appreciate Scott’s role in both his family and the business, one needs to go back over one hundred years to Brooklyn in the early 20th century. When Adolph’s Brooklyn-based business took off, he headed to the city and rented a space on 42nd Street between 8th and 9th Avenues. After the Metropolitan Opera rented his light fixtures, Broadway started calling to rent lights too. As early as 1912-1913 City Knickerbocker’s primary source of business was rentals. When Adolph’s son, Seymour, took over the business in the 1950s, the store provided lighting for shows including The Ed Sullivan Show and The Milton Berle Show.

We recently spoke with Scott to learn about City Knickerbocker and what it means to carry on a legacy in New York.

Read the en-light-ening interview here

 

Real Estate Wire

  • A new type of post-recession real estate fraud is wreaking havoc on Brooklyn neighborhoods like Canarsie, East New York, and Cypress Hills. [Brooklyn Brief]
  • Landmarked Brooklyn Lyceum sells at auction for $7.6 million. [Brownstoner]
  • Appraiser Jonathan Miller looks at what would happen if we eliminated rent regulation. [Bloomberg]
  • Kiefer Sutherland’s former Steven Gambrel-designed Greenwich Village townhouse is back on the market for $20 million. [Curbed]
  • Certain prominent apartment buildings are dominated by pieds-à-terre. [NYT]

Images: Brooklyn Lyceum via Brooklyn Relics (L); Kiefer Sutherland’s former home at 763 Greenwich Street via Urban Compass (R)

Architecture, Getting Away

This quiet and elegant residence by Blaze Makoid Architecture was created for a father with three children who wanted a house that wasn’t ‘extraneous or busy’. Located in Sagaponack, this stylish oceanfront dwelling takes inspiration from two iconic 70s buildings: Tod Williams’ Tarlo House (1979) and architect Norman Jaffe’s Perlbinder House (1970)—the latter credited for bringing ‘rustic Modernism’ to Eastern Long Island. Named Daniels Lane, this home’s simple clean lines are a modern reflection of its client’s wishes.

Learn more about this stunning 70s inspired home

Design, Furniture, Products

Karim Rashid is well-known for his uninhibited use of color, but his latest design destined for the bedroom takes on a much more muted palette. Although there are no pops of pinks and blues, Rashid’s love for the unexpected does show in this striking collection through sensuous curves and a sleek finish that creates for a cozy yet upscale escape for sleep. Called Kosy, this bedroom collection is a combination of wood, leather and glass, in—of all things— grayscale!

More on Rashid’s new design here

Cool Listings, Ditmas Park, Historic Homes, Interiors

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633 East 19th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11230, United States

Ditmas Park is like the love song of Brooklyn. Okay well maybe not, but this Craftsman is a seriously romantic piece of property to say the least. The single-family home was built in 1907 and is located at 633 East 19th Street in the recently designated Fisk Terrace-Midwood Park Historic District. The property is currently listed for $1.75 million, and everything from the tiger oak mahogany staircase to the extra large backyard is a beautiful example of what makes Craftsmans so desirable.

See more of the historic home here

 

Daily Link Fix, Uncategorized

  • Yes, Frank Gehry literally gave today’s architecture the middle finger, saying that 98% of what’s built today is sh*t. Get more details on Dezeen.
  • Your Life on Earth by BBC on Archinect tells you how the world has changed since the day you were born. You’ll find out factoids like how many times your heart has beaten and how many volcanoes have erupted.
  • The Bronx’s only bookstore is saved! Barnes & Noble extended its lease for two years, according to Gothamist.
  • I Quant NY found the house in Brooklyn that is farthest away from the subway.
  • Impress your guests with this levitating, wireless speaker. Called Om/One, the orb is the creation of Oakland-based Om Audio. Check it out on Dwell.
  • Why do we drive on parkways and park on driveways? Mental Floss has the answer.

Images: Frank Gehry (L); Om/One via Om Audio (R)

Celebrities, Interiors, Recent Sales, Soho

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459 West Broadway, New York, NY, United States

Leonard Stern, billionaire businessman and real estate developer and namesake of NYU’s Stern School of Business, has sold his “ultimate Soho penthouse” for $14,650,000 according to city records released today. In April 2014, a year after Stern originally listed the apartment, New York Magazine released a video tour of the 4,315-square-foot, four-bedroom duplex, revealing everything from a zen solarium to a restaurant-caliber kitchen.

Stern bought the penthouse of 459 West Broadway in 2010 for $14,250,000, but the small profit likely won’t affect him too much since his net worth is estimated at $3.8 billion.

Check out the billionaire digs and watch the video tour

 

Cool Listings, Interiors, Upper West Side 

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255 West 92nd Street, New York, NY, United States

We dare you not to fall in love with this adorable penthouse condo at 255 West 92nd Street. This gorgeous 1,178-square-foot renovated pad brings a little country chic to the city, and its additional 800-square-foot rooftop terrace is sure to be a welcome retreat from the city that never sleeps.

Take a look inside, here

 

Brooklyn, Events, Features, Manhattan, Queens

Event Round Up: The Best Halloween Activities in NYC

By Dana Schulz, Thu, October 23, 2014

It’s official–fall is here. And one of the greatest things about this time of year is the plethora of seasonal activities that comes with it. We’ve rounded up some of the best that New York City has to offer this fall, from corn mazes for kids to funeral reenactments for adults.

Check out our full list

Midtown West, Urban Design

The current Madison Square Garden
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Madison Square Garden, Pennsylvania Plaza, New York, NY, United States

If there’s one thing that all New Yorkers can agree on it’s that Penn Station is pretty awful. And if we’re ever going to get a new home for NJ Transit, Amtrak, and the LIRR, Madison Square Garden will have to move (just don’t tell any die-hard Rangers fans that).

The Alliance for a New Penn Station, a coalition of the Municipal Art Society and the Regional Plan Association, is proposing in a new report (revealed at this morning’s MAS Summit) that the world-famous venue take up residency in the Morgan Post Office and Annex, occupying the block bound by 9th and 10th avenues and 28th and 30th streets. The mail sorting facility site is large enough to accommodate a new state-of-the-art arena and is just a quick walk to Penn Station. The coalition told Capital New York: “Relocating the Garden to this site will provide the city with a new arena and allow for the reconstruction and expansion of Penn Station, each of which can be designed to vastly improve the conditions of the district.”

More on the proposal and renderings of what the new site could look like

 

Features, Financial District, History

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The Woolworth Building, Broadway, New York, NY, United States

The 101-year old Woolworth Building has been in the news quite a bit lately, especially since it was first announced that the top 30 floors would be turned into 34 apartments; one of which is a nine-story penthouse is expected to hit the market for a record $110 million. But the Woolworth has long been at the center of New York life with its storied past and lofty 792-foot height.

It cost $13.5 million to erect the tower in 1913, and the building was the world’s tallest when it first debuted. Though a number—50 to be exact—have surpassed it in height, the Woolworth Building has remained one of the world’s most admired for its detailed and compelling ornamentation. Like other prestigious companies of its time, Frank W. Woolworth wanted something unforgettable and the building’s architect, Cass Gilbert, certainly delivered. The tower is filled to the brim with mosaics, stained-glass, golden embellishments and of course tons of those carved faces and figures.

See the faces of the Woolworth building

 

Real Estate Wire

  • Someone is building a luxury residential building next to the AirTrain station. The Crossing, as it’s called, will host 580 units with roof terraces and a 24-hour doorman among other amenities. [DNA Info]
  • “No Picket Fence”. New Yorkers in their 20s and 30s are increasingly looking for appealing rentals as opposed to buying, and developers are responding. [NYT]
  • Extell will pay $24.7 million to the Park Avenue Christian Church for their air rights in order to bring a new residential tower at the site of the church’s parish. [TRD]
  • Here’s a colorful plan to turn the Coignet Building neighboring the Gowanus Whole Foods into an opera house. [Curbed]

The Crossing sited along the AirTrain (left); Outdated white picket fence dreams (right)

Cool Listings, Furniture, Green Design

2.5³ is a Multifunctional Living Cube for Contemporary Nomadism

By Ana Lisa Alperovich, Thu, October 23, 2014

2.5³ is Maciej Chmara and Ania Rosinke‘s proposal for living minimally. The multifunctional space reduces life’s material needs down to the bare essentials and follows ideas of utopian thinking from the 60s and 70s, when many architects and designers were working on modular and mobile living structures. Perfect for small homes or as a functional island within a large loft or warehouse space, this cubic wooden structure will let you sleep, eat, relax and work within its reduced design.

Find out more about this multifunctional space

Cool Listings, Interiors, Tribeca

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55 North Moore Street, New York, NY, United States

Located at 55 North Moore Street, in a prewar building dating to the 1800′s on one of the most charming cobblestone streets in the heart of Tribeca, and impeccably renovated in 2007, this gorgeous four-bedroom penthouse boasts the kind of quintessential old-world charm that will never go out of style. An abundance of exposed brick walls (we can’t get enough of them), elegant white tin ceilings (truly exquisite), and original wood beams, columns, and ceiling rafters (gorgeously rustic) immediately set a cozy and welcoming tone.

See how 19th-century charm merged with 21st-century finishes in this penthouse

 

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Hamptons

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100 Flying Point Rd, Water Mill, NY, United States

Retired NBA star Jason Kidd is getting ready to start his new gig as the head coach for the Milwaukee Bucks and he’s just listed his Hamptons home in Water Mill, N. Y. for $7.995 million. Located at 100 Flying Point Road, the four building luxury compound is just one mile from the beaches of South Hampton and Watermill. While he’s keeping his Brooklyn apartment known for its off the hook amenities (and currently available for rent), the Hamptons home is up for permanent grabs.

Read more

 

Social Media

Pin Your Favorite Interiors with Us on Pinterest

By Alyssa Alimurung, Thu, October 23, 2014

Visit 6sqft’s profile on Pinterest.

We know you love perusing our site to swoon over pretty photos of celebrity penthouses and historic landmarked brownstones. Keep them at a click’s reach by joining us on Pinterest! Here’s a quick sample of our pins so far, but we want to be inspired by you. Follow us on Pinterest and let us know which interiors you like by following our boards and liking our pins.

6sqft on Pinterest

Daily Link Fix

  • Gothamist looks back at the glory days of Port Authority Bus Terminal One of today’s ugliest buildings, it was once considered “revolutionary” and “magnificent.” Huh?…
  • After years of hurdles, a block of West 121st Street is renamed George Carlin Way, honoring the street where the famous comedian grew up. More on the Village Voice.
  • The iconic Palm Court at the Plaza Hotel reopens today with pricey tea service, according to Eater NY.
  • It’s a new take on the battle of the coasts. Co.Design has a fun map of how San Franciscans see New York City.
  • Have you seen the 20-foot Lego Statue of Liberty in Madison Square Park? Check it out on Untapped Cities.

Images: Port Authority today via Wiki Commons (L); George Carlin Way via Getty Images (R)

Celebrities, Chelsea, Cool Listings, Interiors

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177 9th Ave, New York, NY, United States

Things must be looking up for Knicks hoopster Carmelo Anthony and his wife LaLa, because they were reportedly seen checking out a $15 million duplex penthouse at the Chelsea Enclave, 177 Ninth Avenue. The sometimes-troubled couple was last seen touring a $29,000 a month rental at 1212 Fifth Avenue, but it seems now they’d prefer to buy.

Located on the transparent top two floors of the Chelsea Enclave, their latest real estate contender has four bedrooms, 3,452 square feet of indoor space, and 2,640 square feet of outdoor space spread across two terraces.

Read more

 

Celebrities, Cool Listings, DUMBO

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1 Main Street, Dumbo, Brooklyn, NY, United States

Brooklyn Nets’ Joe Johnson is hunting for a home and he’s got his eye on a beauty at the Clocktower Building in DUMBO. According to the NYP, the 33-year-old shooting guard was spotted scoping out a two-bedroom renting for $9,500 a month at the iconic waterfront building. The corner loft home features concrete beamed 11-foot high ceilings, hardwood flooring and big, bright windows facing the Manhattan Bridge.

Let’s have a look inside

 

Cool Listings, Interiors, Park Slope

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513 4th Street, Brooklyn, NY, United States

One of Park Slope’s most recognizable homes is available for $4.29 million. The 4,800-square-foot, semi-detached townhouse—which has been featured in numerous music videos, as well as in the movie Moonstruck—is one of a row of townhouses on 4th Street built by the Allan Brothers in 1892. A five-bedroom triplex with a beautiful garden, this red brick and stone Romanesque Queen Anne townhouse features such romantic details as a turret bay façade, a castle-style balcony, transom stained glass, and a Spanish-tiled spire with an ornamental finial. The terracotta roof of this landmark dwelling also stands out with elaborate cornices. And we haven’t even stepped inside yet.

There’s more, here

 

CityLiving, Features, Goldilocks Blocks, Williamsburg

Goldilocks Blocks: Hope Street in Williamsburg

By Michelle Cohen, Wed, October 22, 2014

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Hope Street, Brooklyn, NY, United States

Between hyper-developed hotspots, main drags in up-and-comers, and those genuinely avoidable areas, there can often be found a city’s “just-right” zones. They aren’t commonly known, but these micro-neighborhoods often hide within them real estate gems coupled with perfectly offbeat vibes. Continuing our Goldilocks Blocks series, this week we look at Hope Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

It’s hard to imagine any corner of Williamsburg that doesn’t embody some form of the neighborhood’s upscale hipster paradise. With the opening of The Gorbals restaurant–to excellent reviews–atop the 6th Street Urban Outfitters on the North Side and the South Side sprouting condos and charter schools, the term “prime Williamsburg” has become meaningless. But in every district there are places that retain that charming, slightly unruly je ne sais quoi. The four blocks that comprise Hope Street fit this description.

What makes Hope Street so ‘just right?’

 

Design, Interiors, Manhattan

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South Street Seaport, Water Street, New York, NY, United States

In a city where people pay a premium for spectacular views, few panoramas rival the majestic beauty of the Brooklyn Bridge. The window-filled living room of this Water Street duplex in the South Street Seaport Historic District certainly gives the owners their money’s worth, with the landmark East River crossing seemingly only inches away. But it’s the views inside this loft conversion courtesy of Steven Harris Architects that will have you either scratching your head or experiencing jaw-dropping delight.

See this home’s jaw-dropping views inside and out

 

Cool Listings, Interiors, Williamsburg

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311 South 4th Street, Brooklyn, NY, United States

What if we told you that you could have a one-of-a-kind, industrial loft-style triplex townhouse in one of Brooklyn’s hottest neighborhoods, just one subway stop from the city? Even better, what if we told you this converted warehouse came with a courtyard, a roof deck, and the ability to build even more square footage? Well, before you start running to 311 South 4th Street, take a second to look around at this fantastic $3.5 million home.

Take a look inside, here

 

Real Estate Wire

  • Melissa Rivers will inherit mom Joan Rivers’ penthouse apartment at 1 East 62nd Street. [NYP]
  • Vice’s expansion has taken another victim: Williamsburg’s beloved music venue Glasslands. [Gawker]
  • A plan to build luxury condos on a toxin-laden Greenpoint site of a former plastics factory could kick up pollutants and poison kids attending a planned school nearby. [Brooklyn Paper]
  • Tall towers don’t come cheap. NYC construction costs have broken the $1,000 per square foot barrier. [TRD]
  • See eight NYC towers rise from nothing. [Curbed]

Images: Joan Rivers’ penthouse (left); Glasslands (right)

Transportation

If you feel like your subway rides are starting to feel more and more like squeezing into a sweaty sardine can, you’re right on the money. According to the MTA, ridership is at an all-time high with 149 million passengers cramming into cars during the month of September alone. The MTA also met another milestone last month on September 23rd, when a whopping 6,106,694 took to the rails—this is the most of any day since ridership was first tracked in 1985; and it broke last year’s record of 5,987,595 passengers on October 24th.

Read more

Products

Lighting technology is surprisingly exciting these days, and the ‘Hang It On the Wall‘ lighting fixture, from designer Harry Thaler, is a lighthearted celebration of this evolving industry. The lamp’s design is a response to the phasing out of the iconic Edison light bulb. While the pear-shaped form of the original bulb is still intact, the lamp’s glass fixture has been distorted to represent how things are changing.

Read more

History, Manhattan, Technology

A new mapping tool called Urban Layers lets users see almost every building still standing in Manhattan today and reveals exactly when it was built. The data goes back as far as 1765. The interactive map by Morphocode provides insight not only into the history of a specific building, but into the evolution of entire neighborhoods, too. And for New York City history fanatics like us, this user-friendly tool is definitely going to come in handy.

More on the mapping tool here

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