nyc parks

City Living, Events

You can help beautify dozens of NYC parks this weekend

By Devin Gannon, Fri, October 16, 2020

Photo by Tim Krause on Flickr

More than 60 parks organizations and community groups are leading cleanups at green spaces across the city this weekend, in response to a growing trash problem at parks. Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic in March, park use in New York soared, as it was one of the safest activities available to residents during the peak of the crisis. But the increase in visitors put additional strain on park management, which is struggling to keep up because of COVID-19 related budget cuts. On October 17, New Yorkers for Parks, City Parks Foundation, Partnership for Parks, and NYC Parks are encouraging New Yorkers to volunteer for a day of cleaning and beautifying the city’s parks in every borough.

How to participate

Policy

Image by Hucklebarry from Pixabay

The city’s parks department will resume issuing permits for outdoor youth sports next month, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Friday. While the fields and ballparks have been open throughout the coronavirus pandemic, NYC Parks will issue permits for organized, low-risk sports played outdoors starting on September 15. Sports leagues for baseball, softball, and soccer will be issued permits, but indoor sports, including swimming, will not be allowed.

Get the details

City Living, Policy

Photo by Timothy Krause on Flickr

Coronavirus-related budget cuts and an increase in use may be to blame for the growing garbage problem across New York City green spaces. As Gothamist reported, the number of 311 complaints about garbage and litter increased by 120 percent from the same period last summer. To address this increase in green space litter and to encourage New Yorkers to “show your park some love,” the city’s Parks Department launched a new “Toss Your Trash” campaign last week.

Find out more

City Living, maps

Contradictory to its “concrete jungle” nickname, New York City is home to over 19,000 acres of natural areas, consisting of forest, salt marsh, freshwater wetland, and streams. A new map from the Natural Areas Conservancy (NAC) highlights the location, size, and condition of natural resources throughout the five boroughs, while comparing the percentage of green space among neighborhoods, parks, and City Council districts. When the coronavirus pandemic hit the city, New Yorkers explored more wild parts of city parks as a way to get fresh air and maintain a safe distance from others. But according to the Conservancy, the increase in visitors is putting additional strain on park management, at a time when budgets across the country are being slashed because of COVID-19.

More here

Policy

sheep meadow, central park, social distancing parks

Photo of Sheep Meadow in Central Park on May 4, 2020 © 6sqft

Parks and public green space proved to be a lifeline for New Yorkers during the peak of the pandemic, for both their physical and mental wellbeings. But not all parks are created equal, as reports from the city’s Independent Budget Office and the Trust for Public Land found. In many low-income and minority neighborhoods, where cases and rates of death from COVID-19 were experienced disproportionately, residents lacked access to quality green space, especially when space like playgrounds and basketball courts, closed for nearly three months.

Find out more

Design, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Restaurants, South Street Seaport

View from John Street Rendering courtesy of Woods Bagot/ NYC Parks

An open-air waterfront restaurant and bar could be coming to the South Street Seaport Historic District. The Howard Hughes Corporation and the city’s Parks Department on Tuesday presented a proposal to the Landmarks Preservation Commission for a new concession along the East River Esplanade under the FDR Drive overpass. Designed by Woods Bagot, the “Blockhouse Bar” would be a year-round establishment, with plans to add decking over the pavement, planters, and vinyl coverings during the winter months.

Get the details

City Living, Manhattan

Photo by Kreg Holt

Summer is not totally canceled in New York City. Governors Island will officially reopen to the public next week for passive activities only and with a new reservation system for ferries. The Trust for Governors Island announced on Wednesday a system that lets visitors reserve tickets for ferry trips to the 172-acre site for the first time ever, as a way to allow for social distancing. Originally planned to open for the season in May, the Trust had postponed its opening in April because of the coronavirus.

Get the details

Chelsea, City Living

Photo by Iker Alonso on Flickr

The High Line will reopen to the public this month with a new timed-entry reservation system. The elevated park, which had been closed since mid-March because of the coronavirus, will open on July 16, with free reservations available starting 10 a.m. on July 9. A limited number of walk-up passes will be available at the entrance at Gansevoort and Washington Streets each day.

Get the details

Featured Story

City Living, Features, NYC Guides

The 15 best spots in NYC for outdoor grilling

By Devin Gannon, Tue, June 30, 2020

Photo via Pexels

It’s time to get your grill on. Barbecue areas in New York City parks will officially reopen this weekend in time for the Fourth of July, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Monday. While our tiny apartments and fire escapes may not always be the greatest spots to host a barbecue, the city’s parks provide some of the best places to dine on hamburgers and hot dogs this holiday. “I want everyone to remember to be safe, still practice the appropriate social distancing, still wear the face coverings,” the mayor said. Ahead, 6sqft rounded up 15 of the best parks to host socially-distanced outdoor barbecues, from old standby Prospect Park to less known locales like Staten Island’s Clove Lakes Park.

Find out the best BBQ spots in your neighborhood

City Living, Policy

NYC beaches will open for swimming July 1

By Devin Gannon, Wed, June 24, 2020

Photo of Coney Island by Dan DeLuca on Flickr

Swimming will be allowed at New York City beaches starting July 1, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Wednesday. Although Gov. Andrew Cuomo gave the green light for state beaches to reopen last month in time for Memorial Day Weekend, the mayor had said the city was “just not ready” to handle the crowds of beachgoers, particularly on public transit. But with the city now in phase two of reopening, the ocean is no longer off-limits, as the Wall Street Journal first reported.

Learn more

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Archtober2020