American Museum of Natural History

Landmarks Preservation Commission, Museums, Upper West Side 

Renderings courtesy of NYC Parks/ AMNH

The New York City Public Design Commission on Monday approved plans to remove and relocate the Theodore Roosevelt statue from the steps of the American Museum of Natural History, about a year after officials called for the controversial sculpture to be taken down. The city’s Parks Department and AMNH presented their proposal last week to the Landmarks Preservation Commission, but the agency was unable to reach a decision. On Monday, The PDC voted unanimously to remove and relocate the statue to a relevant cultural institution.

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Events, Museums

The Mineral Hall in the Allison and Roberto Mignone Halls of Gems and Minerals at AMNH. Photo credit: D. Finnin/ © AMNH

New York City is getting its sparkle back. The American Museum of Natural History will reopen its popular Allison and Roberto Mignone Halls of Gems and Minerals to the public this weekend following a $32 million redesign. The galleries feature more than 5,000 specimens sourced from 98 countries, including a 563-carat Star of India sapphire, a 12-sided 632-carat Patricia Emerald, and a 14,500-pound slab with huge garnet crystals found in upstate New York.

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Policy, Upper West Side 

Photo by D. Finnin/ ©AMNH

Those who work at cultural institutions, as well as public housing residents, will be prioritized at a new COVID-19 vaccine site opening on Friday at the Upper West Side’s American Museum of Natural History. Mayor de Blasio made the announcement in a press conference this morning, noting that “literally you can get vaccinated below the blue whale,” who is now sporting a giant bandaid. In a show of support, the Museum will give complimentary general admission on a future visit for a group of four to anyone who receives their vaccine at the site.

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Museums, Policy

Photo by Mike Steele on Flickr

A statue of Theodore Roosevelt that depicts the former president on horseback flanked by a Native American man and an African man will be removed from the steps of the American Museum of Natural History, officials announced on Sunday. The decision to take down the statue, which local activists have requested for years, comes as a renewed discourse about racism and racist symbols continues to grow across the country following the death of George Floyd last month.

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Art, Events, Upper West Side 

American natural history museum, the nature of color, nyc spring 2020 exhibitions

Photo credit: R. Mickens/© AMNH

For most of us, color is such a seamless part of how we experience the world that we don’t think to stop and question it. But color is more than just a visual phenomenon, it carries symbolic and cultural meanings, has the ability to impact our mood, and in the natural world, it plays a critical role in the survival of many species. The many dimensions of color will be explored in The Nature of Color, a new exhibition opening at the American Museum of Natural History on March 9th.

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Design, Museums, Upper West Side 

AMNH, Allison and Roberto Mignone Halls of Gems and Minerals

A conceptual rendering of the Allison and Roberto Mignone Halls of Gems and Minerals, opening in fall 2020 at the American Museum of Natural History. Rendering courtesy American Museum of Natural History.

The American Museum of Natural History announced this week that the new Allison and Roberto Mignone Halls of Gems and Minerals will be opening in fall of 2020. Named for longtime museum supporters Roberto and Allison Mignone, the long-awaited redesign will be a dazzling showcase for one of the greatest collections of its kind. The new Halls will be connected to Studio Gang’s 235,000-square-foot Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education and Innovation.

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Featured Story

Events, Features, holidays

Where to celebrate Kwanzaa 2019 in NYC

By Devin Gannon, Mon, December 23, 2019

Photo ©AMNH/ R. Mickens

On Thursday, the week-long holiday Kwanzaa kicks off as a celebration of African American culture and heritage in the United States. From Dec. 26, through Jan. 1, New Yorkers can learn about the seven principles of Kwanzaa, or Nguzo Saba, through traditional music and dancing, kinara lighting, African folklore storytime, and a bar crawl featuring only black-owned businesses. Ahead, find the best places in NYC to celebrate Kwanzaa, from family-friendly arts and crafts and lectures at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum to live performances at Harlem’s iconic Apollo Theater.

The full list, ahead

Featured Story

City Living, Features, holidays

The Christmas Tree at Rockefeller Center may be the most popular conifer in New York City, with 125 million people visiting the tree each year, but it certainly is not the only one. Every holiday season, spruces adorned with colorful lights and ornaments pop up across the five boroughs. The city’s many holiday trees each offer a unique take on the tradition, which began in NYC in 1912 when the first public Christmas tree was erected in Madison Square Park. For those looking to skip the Midtown crowds this year, we’ve rounded up 20 of the best holiday trees and lighting ceremonies, from the origami tree at the American Museum of Natural History to the flotilla of trees in Central Park’s Harlem Meer.

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Featured Story

Features, History, Museums, Upper West Side 

Photo via Flickr cc

This year, the American Museum of Natural History celebrates its 150th anniversary. Though best known for its spectacular T. Rex skeletons and incredible hanging blue whale, the story of this Upper West Side museum isn’t just one of dinosaurs and dioramas. For example, did you know that Ulysses S. Grant laid the cornerstone? Or how about that in the 1930s, there was a proposal to build a promenade through Central Park to connect the Museum with the Met? Ahead, we’ve rounded up eight things you might not know about the American Museum of Natural History.

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Museums, New Developments, Starchitecture, Upper West Side 

Studio Gang, Museum of Natural History, Jeanne Gang, Gilder Center

A rendering of the front façade of the Gilder Center (L) by Studio Gang, 2019; Center interior (R) by MIR and Studio Gang, 2019.

Following delays caused by a lawsuit aimed at protecting the adjacent, city-owned Theodore Roosevelt Park, a groundbreaking ceremony on June 12 officially kicked off construction of the American Museum of Natural History’s new Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation. Designed by architect Jeanne Gang—who was initially brought on board the project seven years ago—the $383 million Center will add new galleries, classrooms, a theatre, and an expanded library while linking 10 museum buildings for better circulation throughout the campus. Originally slated to open in 2020, the construction process is expected to last three years.

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