American Museum of Natural History

History, Manhattan, Museums

All images © D. Finnin/AMNH

Five years and a $19 million renovation later, the American Museum of Natural History’s oldest gallery reopened to the public last week. Developed alongside curators from Native Nations of the Northwest Coast, the new 10,200 square-foot Northwest Coast Hall showcases the history of the Pacific Northwest with a focus on the “scholarship and material culture of the Northwest Coast communities,” according to a press release. The gallery contains more than 1,000 artifacts including a 63-foot-long canoe, the largest Pacific Northwest dugout canoe existing today, and a diverse collection of art, from monumental carvings up to 17 feet tall to contemporary works of art from Native artists.

Details here

Architecture, Design, Museums, Upper West Side 

Entrance, © Neoscape, Inc.

After years of delays due to legal action, the American Museum of Natural History’s Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation has an official opening date. The museum on Monday announced the Gilder Center, a 230,000 square foot architectural wonder designed by Jeanne Gang’s Studio Gang, will open to the public next winter. The new center will improve circulation in the museum and help fulfill a 150-year-old vision of creating a continuous campus across four city blocks. It will also provide space for new galleries, educational programs, an expanded library, and a theater.

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Featured Story

City Living, Features, holidays, NYC Guides

The 10 most romantic spots in NYC

By Rebecca Fishbein, Thu, February 10, 2022

It’s sometimes hard to see New York’s romantic potential, considering the city’s sheer quantity of subway rats and mysterious street sludge. But despite some of New York’s less love-inspiring qualities, there are a lot of beautiful, heart-stopping spots that set the right tone for romance, even if you have to contend with yellow snow on your way home. Just in time for Valentine’s Day, we’ve rounded up our 10 favorites, from a medieval monastery to a cozy restaurant haunted by Aaron Burr to tried-and-true favorites like the top of the Empire State Building.

Love is in the air

Museums, Upper West Side 

Photo © Olivia Lemons

The statue of Theodore Roosevelt that has stood on the steps of the American Museum of Natural History for more than eight decades was removed this week. The city’s Public Design Commission voted last summer to take down and relocate the statue, seen as racist for its depiction of Roosevelt on horseback flanked by a Native American figure and an African figure. The bronze statue will soon be shipped to Medora, N.D., where it will be displayed at the Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library, set to open in 2026.

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Featured Story

City Living, Features, holidays

Photo by Charley Lhasa on Flickr

The Christmas Tree at Rockefeller Center may be the most popular conifer in New York City, with 125 million people visiting the tree each year, but it certainly is not the only one. Every holiday season, spruces adorned with colorful lights and ornaments pop up across the five boroughs. The city’s many holiday trees each offer a unique take on the tradition, which began in NYC in 1912 when the first public Christmas tree was erected in Madison Square Park. For those looking to skip the Midtown crowds this year, we’ve rounded up 15 of the best holiday trees, from the origami tree at the American Museum of Natural History to the flotilla of trees in Central Park’s Harlem Meer.

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Museums, Upper West Side 

Photo by Mike Steele on Flickr

After standing on the steps of the American Museum of Natural History for more than 80 years, the statue of Theodore Roosevelt will be removed and relocated to North Dakota. The Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library, set to open in Medora, N.D. in 2026, announced on Friday it entered into an agreement for a long-term loan of the statue with New York City.

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, Museums, Upper West Side 

Renderings courtesy of NYC Parks/ AMNH

The New York City Public Design Commission on Monday approved plans to remove and relocate the Theodore Roosevelt statue from the steps of the American Museum of Natural History, about a year after officials called for the controversial sculpture to be taken down. The city’s Parks Department and AMNH presented their proposal last week to the Landmarks Preservation Commission, but the agency was unable to reach a decision. On Monday, The PDC voted unanimously to remove and relocate the statue to a relevant cultural institution.

More here

Events, Museums

The Mineral Hall in the Allison and Roberto Mignone Halls of Gems and Minerals at AMNH. Photo credit: D. Finnin/ © AMNH

New York City is getting its sparkle back. The American Museum of Natural History will reopen its popular Allison and Roberto Mignone Halls of Gems and Minerals to the public this weekend following a $32 million redesign. The galleries feature more than 5,000 specimens sourced from 98 countries, including a 563-carat Star of India sapphire, a 12-sided 632-carat Patricia Emerald, and a 14,500-pound slab with huge garnet crystals found in upstate New York.

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Policy, Upper West Side 

Photo by D. Finnin/ ©AMNH

Those who work at cultural institutions, as well as public housing residents, will be prioritized at a new COVID-19 vaccine site opening on Friday at the Upper West Side’s American Museum of Natural History. Mayor de Blasio made the announcement in a press conference this morning, noting that “literally you can get vaccinated below the blue whale,” who is now sporting a giant bandaid. In a show of support, the Museum will give complimentary general admission on a future visit for a group of four to anyone who receives their vaccine at the site.

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Museums, Policy

Photo by Mike Steele on Flickr

A statue of Theodore Roosevelt that depicts the former president on horseback flanked by a Native American man and an African man will be removed from the steps of the American Museum of Natural History, officials announced on Sunday. The decision to take down the statue, which local activists have requested for years, comes as a renewed discourse about racism and racist symbols continues to grow across the country following the death of George Floyd last month.

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