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Art, Flushing, Queens

GreenPoint Innovations / Eduardo Amorim for Gerada Art

A massive art mural that honors a New York City doctor who died from the coronavirus has taken over a parking lot in Queens. Spray-painted by Cuban-American artist Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada, the land art, titled “Somos La Luz” depicts Dr. Ydelfonso Decoo, a Dominican immigrant who lived in Washington Heights and skipped retirement to treat patients during the pandemic. The project also aims to memorialize all front line employees in New York City, particularly Hispanic and African American workers who continue to face disproportionate rates of infection and death caused by the virus.

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affordable housing, Flushing, housing lotteries

Photo by Chris Hamby on Flickr

A housing lottery kicked off on Monday for 31 new, middle-income apartments in the Queens neighborhood of Flushing. The rental at 144-74 Northern Boulevard contains 100 units and ground-floor retail, including the Korean supermarket H Mart and a Burger King. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 130 percent area median income can apply for the apartments, which range from $1,750/month studios to $2,400/month two-bedrooms.

Do you qualify?

Flushing, Policy

Photo by Michael Vadon on Flickr

A 350-bed medical facility will be built at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Queens to ease the pressure the Elmhurst Hospital has been facing amidst the coronavirus outbreak. Construction began at the site in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, which hosts the US Open tournament, yesterday. The city’s Emergency Management selected the site to serve as a temporary facility, which will begin treating COVID non-ICU patients beginning next Tuesday, April 7th. The center’s indoor courts will be converted into the medical facility, with its Louis Armstrong Stadium set to become a place for volunteers to assemble 25,000 meal packages per day for patients, workers, and students.

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Chinatown, Restaurants

Photo by josh s jackson via Flickr cc

NYC’s largest Chinese restaurant, Jing Fong, has temporarily shut its doors at 20 Elizabeth Street amid the coronavirus health crisis. The situation is two-fold for the iconic dim sum restaurant; not only is business down 30 to 40 percent, according to the Post, but since the restaurant has 800 seats, they fall under Governor Cuomo’s order that gatherings of 500 or more be shut down. The effect of the pandemic has been especially hard for restaurants in Manhattan’s Chinatown, as well as those Chinatowns in Flushing and Sunset Park.

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Architecture, Flushing

Image via Purpleturtle52 on Wiki Commons

Plans to restore the Philip Johnson-designed New York State Pavilion at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park have been inching along slowly over the past five years. Now, the project finally has a construction start date, Untapped Cities reported. Work will begin by the end of the month and is expected to be completed in March 2021. As 6sqft previously reported, the project has acquired just over $24 million in funding from the Mayor’s office, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, City Council, and a FEMA grant for Hurricane Sandy repairs.

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Featured Story

Features, Flushing, History

US Open, Arthur Ashe Stadium, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, tennis stadiums

Photo via Wiki Commons

Now in its 51st year, U.S. Open fever has once again swept the city. Though nowadays it’s all Venus and Djokovic and craft beers and lobster rolls, there’s a long history behind the world-famous event. Here, 6sqft takes a look at how the international tournament made its way from an elite, private club in Newport Rhode Island to Forest Hills’ West Side Tennis Club and finally to its current home in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, even uncovering a little connection to the 1964 World’s Fair.

All the tennis history right this way

Flushing, Restaurants

Google Street View of the mall and Sky View Parc

According to The Real Deal, developer Blackstone will be opening an upscale food hall at Flushing’s Shops at Skyview, a large shopping mall with big-box stores such as Target, BJ’s, and Nordstrom Rack that’s part of the larger Sky View Parc luxury condo development. In addition to plans for “chef-driven” and “fast-cash” food offerings, performance spaces and nightlife events are also in the works. And according to the group who will be curating the food hall, it’s taking inspiration from San Francisco’s popular Chinese marketplace.

More details ahead

Flushing, History

1964 US Olympic Trials at Kissena Velodrome. From page 47 of “30 years of progress, 1934-1964 : Department of Parks : 300th anniversary of the City of New York : New York World’s Fair.” (1964). Via Internet Archive Book Images on Flickr

From the late 1890s through the 1920s, tens of thousands of New Yorkers turned out to witness the high drama of competitive bicycle speed racing. In New York, there were Velodromes (cycling tracks) at Coney Island, in the Bronx, and even at the original Madison Square Garden, where grueling six-day races called “Madisons” pushed riders to their limits. The sport fell prey to the Depression, and today there are just 26 Velodromes in the United States, including one in New York City, the Kissena Velodrome in Flushing’s Kissena Park, known to Velodrome enthusiasts as “the Track of Dreams.”

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Featured Story

Events, Features, holidays

The 15 best places in NYC to ring in the Lunar New Year

By Devin Gannon, Fri, February 1, 2019

Via Wikimedia

One of New York City’s most spirited events kicks off next Tuesday: the Lunar New Year. With multiple Chinatowns and Asian communities across the five boroughs, there is no shortage of events to celebrate the nearly two-week-long holiday, which is said to have originated more than 4,000 years ago. While the most well-known festivity is the colorful parade in Lower Manhattan’s Chinatown, other Lunar New Year events in Flushing, Sunset Park, and Staten Island should not be overlooked. Embrace the Year of the Pig, the 12th zodiac animal said to signal good fortune, with lantern decorating events, dumpling and noodle-making classes, traditional dance and song, and sparkling firecracker ceremonies.

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Architecture, Flushing

Designed by Philip Johnson for the 1964-65 World’s Fair to embody the architectural essence of Space Age futurism, the New York State Pavilion has been battered by the ensuing decades to the point of becoming valued as an “historic ruin.” As 6sqft previously reported, plans to restore the site have been progressing slowly even with new funding from the city. Now, Curbed reports, the iconic site in Flushing, Queens, will be getting a $16.5 million grant from FEMA for Hurricane Sandy-related repairs.

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