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City Living, Events

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , May 24, 2022

All photos courtesy of MSG Sports

The New York Rangers are on the hunt for the team’s fifth Stanley Cup, facing off this week against the Carolina Hurricanes in the second round. To keep fans excited about the playoff run, the hockey team is painting New York City blue with viewing parties, prizes, giveaways, appearances by alumni, and photo experiences. Giant letters spelling the Rangers’ appropriate motto for the season, “No Quit in New York,” have popped up across Manhattan, perfect for a pre-game photo op.

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City Living, Events, Upper East Side

You can pick your own tulips on Park Avenue

By Aaron Ginsburg, Tue, May 24, 2022

  • By Aaron Ginsburg
  • , May 24, 2022

Photo courtesy of East Midtown Partnership on Flickr

Get your trowels ready! The Park Avenue Tulip Dig is back, giving New Yorkers the opportunity to dig up and take home tulip bulbs planted along the famed thoroughfare between the north side of East 54th Street and the south side of East 86th Street. Approximately 60,000 tulips are planted every year in a new color by the non-profit Fund for Park Avenue, as reported by Patch. This year’s flowers are a pink tulip known as “Darwin Hybrid Apricot Pride.”

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Green Design, Policy

  • By Aaron Ginsburg
  • , May 24, 2022

Looking north towards Billionaires’ Row © 6sqft

A group of New York City building owners is suing the city in an effort to block a 2019 law that requires large buildings to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Local Law 97 mandates owners of buildings more than 25,000 square feet to cap their property’s greenhouse gas emissions or face fines. The lawsuit, filed on Thursday by two co-ops in Queens and a mixed-use building owner in Manhattan, claims the new law is “excessive and disproportionate to the purported offense,” as first reported by Crain’s New York. Under the law, owners have until 2024 to ensure their property’s compliance, with the ultimate goal of reducing the emissions produced by the city’s largest buildings 40 percent by 2030 and 80 percent by 2050.

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Cool Listings, New Jersey

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , May 24, 2022

Photo credit: Rich Weinberger

Downtown Jersey City may not be the first place you’d think to look for a 6,000-square-foot townhouse on a brick-and-brownstone block, but this five-story classic at 94 Wayne Street, asking $2,750,000, is exactly that. The four-family home consists of a lower duplex (with a BBQ-ready paradise for a backyard) and three identical units above. Inside there are high ceilings, large rooms, and historic details as well as updated appliances, central AC, and ten bedrooms in all. It’s a perfect opportunity for townhouse living with lots of rental income–or to create a multi-floor family home. An extension allows for plenty of space on all floors.

See more of this unusual JC townhouse

Restaurants, Transportation

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , May 23, 2022

Photo by Eden, Janine and Jim on Flickr

New Yorkers may seem to need no encouragement to visit the city’s bounty of local restaurants, but independent eateries could use a boost after Covid restrictions kept everyone at home. DineAWAY is a joint effort by the MTA and the James Beard Foundation to get residents and visitors to explore New York City’s local restaurants and neighborhoods via subways, buses, and commuter rails. DineAWAY sweepstakes offer fabulous foodie prizes like dinner at favorite restaurants and VIP tickets to food festivals.

Delicious details, this way

Cool Listings, Midtown East, Sutton Place 

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , May 23, 2022

Photo credit: Stephen Kent Johnson

This two-bedroom, 1,400-square-foot Sutton Place co-op at 435 East 57th Street is the home of Caleb Anderson, partner in the AD top 100 interior design firm Drake/Anderson. Anderson has listed the home for $2,895,000, furniture included, so the next owner can instantly benefit from an impeccable NYC design pedigree. The elegant pre-war apartment underwent a thorough renovation, with top-tier materials and craftsmanship–from Venetian plaster walls and custom hardware to hand-painted wall coverings–evident at every turn.

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Art, Brooklyn, Design, Events

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , May 23, 2022

Photo © Brooklyn Botanic Garden

An outdoor exhibition featuring dozens of artist-made birdhouses will open at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden next month. Debuting on June 11, “For the Birds” highlights the connection between birds, plants, and the importance of protecting plant ecosystems. The installation coincides with the release of “For the Birds: The Birdsong Project,” a multi-album collection of original songs and readings inspired by birds compiled by music supervisor Randall Poster.

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City Living

  • By Aaron Ginsburg
  • , May 23, 2022

Photo by Clay Banks on Unsplash

Public libraries in New York City are calling on New Yorkers to take a stand against book banning. The New York Public Library, Brooklyn Public Library, and Queens Public Library on Monday launched the citywide “Banned Books Challenge,” urging New Yorkers to read 10 books that explore issues of race, sexuality, religion, and history, subjects that have been targeted for censorship in recent months. To kick off the challenge, the libraries made Last Night at the Telegraph Club by Malinda Lo, available for free with no waits on e-reader apps until June 26.

See the list

Shop

  • By Devin Gannon
  • , May 20, 2022

All photos courtesy of The Sill

In celebration of its 10th birthday, The Sill, the direct-to-consumer houseplant company, is hosting a major sale event on some of its best-selling plants and planters. The company got its start in New York in 2012 with the idea that “plants make people happy,” and has since expanded to several other cities, including Los Angeles, Boston, and Chicago. During the month of May, use the code BIRTHDAY to take 10 percent off one item, 20 percent off two items, and 30 percent off three or more items in the birthday sale collection, which includes favorites like the fiddle leaf fig, snake plant, and philodendron.

It’s house plant season

Art, Chinatown, Policy

  • By Michelle Cohen
  • , May 20, 2022

Streetview of murals by Richard Haas at the Manhattan Detention Complex; © Google 2022

On Wednesday, a judge ruled against halting the demolition of the Manhattan Detention Complex at 124-125 White Street at a hearing in a lawsuit brought by two artists whose works at the site may be moved or destroyed, the New York Times reports. The plaintiffs had requested a preliminary injunction; Judge Lewis A. Kaplan of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York denied the request, citing a lack of proof that preserving the artworks outweighed the community value of a newly-constructed jail planned for the site. The artists–with support from Neighbors United Below Canal, a neighborhood group opposed to the new Chinatown jail–had invoked the Visual Artists Rights Act of 1990 as grounds for the lawsuit.

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