Search Result for prefab

Featured Story
79th street boat basin, upper west side, houseboats

Photo of the 79th Street Boat Basin by Jim Henderson on Wikimedia

In Amsterdam, houseboats are considered an affordable way to live in the center of the city. They’re also popular in other global cities, from London’s Little Venice to waterfront neighborhoods in Vancouver, Los Angeles, and Sydney. So why doesn’t New York City—with its 578 miles of coastline—have a thriving houseboat community, too? While it’s impossible to know for certain, recent estimates for Manhattan suggest that year-round houseboat residents or “liveaboards” may now number fewer than 50.

More on houseboat living and how to do it yourself

Photos © Jamie Warren, Brooklyn Bridge Park

After closing for good nearly two years ago, a new Squibb Bridge will open at Brooklyn Bridge Park on May 4 at 9am, as was first reported by Curbed. The 450-foot-long walkway over Furman Street connects the Squibb Park (which will also reopen) on the Brooklyn Bridge Promenade to Pier 1 in Brooklyn Bridge Park and has had quite a shaky history since first opening in 2013. Eric Landau, the president of the Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation, told Curbed, “The new bridge has the same overall aesthetic feeling of the previous bridge that people loved, with full functionality.”

Read more

Renderings of park courtesy of MNLA

Developer TF Cornerstone this week released new renderings for two sites within Brooklyn’s long-delayed Pacific Park development that have yet to break ground: 615 and 595 Dean Street. Their plans will bring 72,600 square feet of public open space with community amenities, 800 units of mixed-income housing, and retail to Pacific Park. In addition, Chelsea Piers is set to open a Field House that will offer a wide range of family and youth-focused programming when the site opens in 2023. 

More details

Via Flickr

A rental tower in Brooklyn’s long-plagued Pacific Park development is currently accepting applications for its affordable housing waitlist. The 363-unit building at 461 Dean Street opened in 2016, with its affordable housing lottery launching that same year. Three years later, the building’s lottery waitlist has opened, inviting New Yorkers earning 160 percent of the area median income to apply for the not-so-affordable $2,025/month studios and $2,541/month one-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

pacific park, brooklyn development, pacific park brooklyn

Rendering courtesy of Greenland Forest City Partners

Long in the works, construction at the Pacific Park complex in Brooklyn is set to ramp up after Greenland Forest City Partners announced a partnership with the Brodsky Organization to develop 18 Sixth Avenue. Designed by Perkins Eastman, the building will exceed 500 feet and become the tallest in Pacific Park. As 6sqft previously reported, Brodsky was also tapped for another apartment building in the complex at 664 Pacific Street, which will also include public space and a school. Groundbreaking at both sites is set to take place within the next two weeks.

More info

Fulton Ferry landing concession, restaurants, DUMBO, 1 water street, Sterling architecture

Rendering by Starling Architecture

The Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) on Tuesday gave mixed reviews for a proposed new concession pavilion outside of the landmarked fireboat station at the Fulton Ferry Landing. The proposal, chosen last December by the Brooklyn Bridge Park (BBP), includes constructing an outdoor restaurant and bar that would connect to an adjacent utility shed and sit in front of the two-story fireboat station, previously home to the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory. While Alex and Miles Pincus, the operators of the proposed space, designed the outdoor concession to be simple and airy, some LPC commissioners expressed concern over the structure possibly blocking views of Manhattan and the need to keep the space as open as possible.

See the proposed project

Left to right, Jerome L. Greene Science Center and The Forum. ©Frank Oudeman/Columbia University.

Sixteen years after Columbia University president Lee Bollinger announced the development of the school’s $6.3 billion 17-acre Manhattanville campus, he joined Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano to celebrate and unveil the third and final building of the starchitect’s ensemble in West Harlem. Previously, Piano completed the Jerome L. Greene Science Center and the adjacent Lenfest Center for the Arts, and today he marked the completion of the Forum, the ship-like structure that peaks at the triangular intersection of Broadway and West 125th Street. The 56,000-square-foot building will serve as a flexible meeting and conference hub, and like its siblings, was purposefully designed with a transparent, public ground floor surrounded by plazas.

See photos of the Forum

Featured Story

With major developments underway, Staten Island is slowly losing its nickname as the “forgotten borough.” While projects like Empire Outlets, the Bay Street Corridor rezoning, and the expansion of the former Stapleton homeport hope to revitalize the borough with new residential and commercial space, Staten Island already offers visitors a ton of unique attractions to explore. Just take the free Staten Island Ferry to discover the miles of coastline and 12,300-acres of parkland in the city’s greenest and least populated borough. For the best spots in the borough, follow 6sqft’s list ahead of the 15 most unforgettable attractions on Staten Island.

Find out more

55 Washington Street in 1907, courtesy of the Skyscaper Museum

New Yorkers are known for their innovative thinking: Inventions like Scrabble, credit cards, and even Baked Alaska all came from local creators. A little less exciting, but still a crucial contraption, the cardboard box was also invented in New York City. Like many discoveries, the box came to be only after a careless mistake. Scottish-born entrepreneur Robert Gair owned a paper bag factory on Reade Street in Manhattan. One day in 1879, a pressman accidentally cut through thousands of small seed bags, instead of pressing them. Following the accident, Gair, who moved headquarters to Dumbo, developed a method for the mass production of cardboard boxes and later supplied major companies like Kellogg and Nabisco.

Find out more

Go off-the-grid glamping at the Catskills’ Eastwind Hotel

By Michelle Sinclair Colman, Wed, May 23, 2018

Off-the-grid, A-frame huts are all the rage in the Catskills. Last week, we wrote about Bjarke Ingels’  triangular prefab “inspired by the Catskills.” Now, another appearance makes the news as the Eastwind Hotel reopens June 1st. Just two hours north of New York City, Eastwind was originally built in the 1920s as a bunkhouse for hunters, fly fishermen, and outdoor enthusiasts. The hotel reopens in a few weeks with 19 rooms and three A-frame, glamping huts nestled in the woods.

Get a look around

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.