climate change

Union Square

Photo by Zack Winestine

The massive electronic clock in Union Square that has puzzled New Yorkers for over two decades has been repurposed as a count down to climate disaster. Created by Gan Golan and Andrew Boyd, the “Climate Clock” displays the years, days, hours, minutes, and seconds the world has left to make significant changes before the effects of global warming become permanent. The new installation comes as Climate Week NYC kicks off this week, alongside the United Nations General Assembly.

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Design, Manhattan

Rendering of the western promenade; Credit: WXY architecture + urban design/bloomimages

Plans to bring a climate change research center on Governors Island are moving ahead. The Trust for Governors Island on Thursday unveiled a proposal for a new research center that would be dedicated to studying the impacts of climate change and serve as a platform for environmental justice organizations and solutions-based public programs. The project involves rezoning the southern end of the island to make space for up to about 4 million square feet of development. The rezoning proposal is expected to enter the city’s formal public land-use review process next month.

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Policy

Photo by David Shankbone via Wikimedia Commons

Six weeks after President Trump derided a potential NYC sea wall on Twitter, his administration abruptly ended the study that was looking into the idea. Launched in 2017, the NY & NJ Harbor and Tributaries feasibility study was evaluating five measures that could “address severe coastal storm risks” and the sea wall was one of them. On Tuesday, the Army Corps of Engineers announced that the critical study had been shelved due to a lack of funding and a report that was due to come out this summer would be “indefinitely postponed,” the New York Times reported. The curious timing relative to Trump’s tweet has led many to speculate about the political underpinnings behind the decision. “This is dangerous,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said. “It’s another of Donald Trump’s blatant political hits on New York City.”

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Green Design, Landscape Architecture, Policy, Technology

flooding, climate change, superstorm sandy, nyc weather

Flooded Battery Park Tunnel after Hurricane Sandy. Image: Timothy Krause via Flickr.

barrier wall proposed by the Army Corps of Engineers as one of several options being evaluated to shield the New York area from rare storms–which may well become less rare and more destructive with global warming–is the subject of a heated debate among planners and environmental experts. Supporters suggest that a barrier be constructed in the outer New York Harbor where it’s mostly hidden from view, saying it would go the farthest in protecting people, land and valuable landmarks along the waterfront from a storm surge. Others fear the idea is a short-sighted measure that doesn’t address major climate threats–and could even worsen matters by trapping sewage and toxins during flooding from high tides and storm runoff. President Donald Trump, however, remains the sole proponent of the mop-and-bucket approach, as the New York Daily News reports.

What will save us from a tweetstorm?

New Developments, Policy

nyc skyline, new york skyline, manhattan

Photo via Pexels

Certain New York City buildings next year will be forced to share how energy efficient they are with the public. As part of the Climate Mobilization Act, passed by the city in April, structures that are 25,000 square feet and larger will be graded based on energy efficiency and mandated to post the rating in a “conspicuous” place in the building. As the New York Times reported, more than 40,000 of the city’s one million buildings will be issued report cards, similar to how the Health Department issues restaurants a prominently displayed food safety rating.

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Lower East Side, Policy

Coastal Resiliency, NYC flooding, DDC

Rendering courtesy of the Department of Design and Construction

The $1.45 billion East Side Coastal Resiliency Project (ESCR), designed to protect a section of Manhattan’s east side from flooding, was approved on Thursday in a full City Council vote. The vote is the final City Council approval of the project, which passed the city’s land use committee earlier this week and is the culmination of a long and at-times controversial process. As 6sqft previously reported, the project was born in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, and was designed to flood-proof over two miles of Manhattan’s east side between East 25th Street and Montgomery Street and improve waterfront access to waterfront space. According to the city, the ESCR project would protect over 110,000 New Yorkers.

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Policy

Photo by Michael Vadon on Flickr

A research center dedicated to climate change could open on Governors Island, the New York Times reported on Sunday. The city is seeking proposals for a “major center for climate adaptation research, commercialization, conversation, and policymaking,” to be built on the southern portion of the island, according to documents obtained by the Times. The city has looked to transform Governors Island into a 24/7 community since taking over control of the 172-acre site from the federal government in 2003.

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Battery Park City, Financial District, Green Design, Policy, South Street Seaport

Lower Manhattan Resiliency, de Blasio, climate change nyc

Via Mayor Bill de Blasio’s office

Mayor Bill de Blasio unveiled on Thursday a $10 billion plan to extend the coastline of Lower Manhattan as much as 500 feet to protect from future floods. The Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency project is the result of a study that looked at ways to build resilience in low-lying neighborhoods like the Financial District and South Street Seaport. The study found the only feasible measure for these areas would be extending the shoreline about two city blocks into the East River by adding a new piece of land at or above 20 feet from current sea level.

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Art, Midtown

Jean-Sébastien Côté & Philippe Jean, ATOMIC3, Appareil Architecture, Iceberg art installation, Iceberg NYC, Garment District art, Garment District Alliance, climate change art, public art NYC

Photos courtesy of Alex Ayer/Diversity Pics

Earlier this week The Garment District Alliance unveiled “Iceberg,” an immersive art installation on the Broadway pedestrian plazas along Broadway from West 37th to 38th Streets. Created by ATOMIC3 & Appareil Architecture, in collaboration with Jean-Sébastien Côté and Philippe Jean, the installation allows the public to generate a light and sound show as they pass through the metal arches of the installation, which react to the pace of each participant by turning different colors. But there’s more to it than pretty lights—the installation also carries an environmental message.

See the lights

Design, Green Design, Policy

Via US Army Corps

In response to intensifying hurricanes that have hit the New York and New Jersey coastal region in recent years, the U.S. Army Corps is proposing a handful of measures to reduce the risk of storm damage. The proposals include constructing barriers, either in-water or land-based, and floodwalls that would stretch over 2,000 square miles across New York Habor to protect the area’s waterfront neighborhoods.

The barriers, already being used in cities like Stamford, Conn. and London, would have gates that remain open to let ships pass, but close when a hurricane is advancing (h/t WNYC). After completing a study that looked at nine high-risk areas, including 25 counties in NY and NJ, on the Atlantic Coast, the Corps this month will present the proposals at public information sessions across the two states.

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Archtober2020