Andy Warhol

Featured Story

Art, Features, History

Explore 10 of Andy Warhol’s lesser-known NYC haunts

By Lucie Levine, Tue, November 27, 2018

Andy Warhol in 1968, via Wiki Commons

The Whitney’s new Andy Warhol retrospective, “Andy Warhol – From A to B and Back Again,” is the first major presentation of the artist’s work in the United States since 1989. The show covers the museum’s entire fifth floor, as well as smaller galleries on the first and third floors. It traces Warhol’s career from his early days as a commercial illustrator, to his role as the world’s most iconic pop artist, and through his resurgence in the 1970s and ‘80s. If Warhol’s work is as famous as a can of Coca-Cola, so too is his relationship with New York City. High profile haunts like the Factory, Studio 54, and Max’s Kansas City are as closely associated with Warhol as any of his artwork. But Andy Warhol lived, worked, and played all over New York. Since Andy’s having his moment, give these 10 lesser-known Warhol haunts their 15 minutes.

These places pop!

Featured Story

Art, Events, Features

29 rooms, brooklyn

29 Rooms

Once the calendar flips to September, New York City’s fall arts season heats up with high-profile museum exhibits, important gallery openings, music, dance and film events and more. Here, we offer our top picks and suggestions for the best ways to get swept up in the season’s art whirl, from Warhol at the Whitney to goats in a gallery.

Add some great art to your fall calendar

Art, Events

Image: Andy Warhol’s “Campbell’s Soup Cans” at MoMA, via Brando/Flickr

“To humanize Warhol and get people to actually look at what he made is not as easy as it might sound.” Donna De Salvo, deputy director and senior curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art had this to say to the New York Times among other newly-released details on what to expect in “Andy Warhol — From A to B and Back Again,” opening on November 12th. The show will be the first Warhol retrospective offered by a United States museum since 1989. De Salvo is referring to the myth of Warhol, in his lifetime and even more so after it.

Find out more

Featured Story

Features, GVSHP, History

She shot Andy Warhol: The story behind actress Valerie Solanas’ attempt to assassinate a NYC icon

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Fri, June 1, 2018

Photo of the Decker Building via Wally Gobetz on Flickr; photo of Andy Warhol via Wikimedia

1968 was a turbulent year marked by riots, massive protests, and assassinations of notable political figures such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Bobby Kennedy.

But 50 years ago on June 3, 1968, an attempted assassination in New York City shook the downtown art world more deeply and personally than any of these other headline-grabbing events. Perhaps that was because it involved two quintessentially downtown figures — one a world-famous artist; the other, a struggling, mentally unbalanced aspiring writer/performer/self-proclaimed social propagandist, whose greatest claim to fame ended up being her attempt to kill the former, her one-time employer.

Find out more

Featured Story

Celebrities, Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History, People, photography, The urban lens

The Urban Lens: From Bob Dylan to Jack Kerouac, see rare photos of the Village’s Beat Generation

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, December 7, 2017

© Estate of Fred W. McDarrah

Perhaps no single photographer could be said to have captured the energy, the cultural ferment, the reverberating social change emanating from New York City in the second half of the 20th century as vividly as Fred W. McDarrah. McDarrah got his start covering the downtown beat of the Village Voice in the 1950s and ’60s, as that publication was defining a newly-emerged breed of independent journalism. McDarrah penetrated the lofts and coffeehouses of Lower Manhattan to shed light upon a new movement known as “The Beats” and went on to capture on film the New York artists, activists, politicians, and poets who changed the way everyone else thought and lived.

Through the generosity of the Estate of Fred W. McDarrah and the McDarrah family, the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation was fortunate enough to add to its digital archive a dozen of the most epochal of Fred McDarrah’s images of downtown icons, including Andy Warhol, Bob Dylan, Jane Jacobs, and Allen Ginsberg. And just in time for the holidays, you can purchase your own copy (with all proceeds benefitting GVSHP!).

Learn the story behind all the photos

Art, Chelsea

Andy Warhol’s Campbells Soup cans at MoMA, via Brando/Flickr

Andy Warhol, one of New York’s most iconic artists, is getting the spotlight at an upcoming retrospective in the Whitney Museum. The museum announced it’s planning the city’s first comprehensive Warhol retrospective in nearly 30 years–and they hope, according to ArtNet, that it’ll change your opinion of the most famed Pop artist in the world. Donna De Salvo, the curator organizing the exhibition, told ArtNet that “I’ve always felt there was so much attention given to the persona of Warhol that we had trouble looking at the work—and that’s what this exhibition does.” This showcasing of his work is scheduled to happen in November of 2018.

Here’s what we know so far

Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

Georgia O’Keefe, Andy Warhol, Frida Kahlo, Brooklyn Museum, AIPAD, Sunok Chin, NU Hotel, Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker, Museum of Modern Art, Naoko Tosa, Times Square Arts, #midnightmoment, The Art of Spray paint, Lori Zimmer, Logan Hicks, Joe Iurato, Hueman, Matt Eaton, Remi Rough, Ian Kuali'i, Nick Walker, Zac Braun, BR163, John Matos, CRASH, PichiAvo, Wallworks NY, Ground Floor Gallery, Kirsten Flaherty, Erin Smith, Amy Li Projects

In a city where hundreds of interesting events occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top picks for 6sqft readers!

Spring is upon us and so is a whole new week of great art events. This weekend, see some of the best of the photography world at AIPAD or head to Brooklyn to check out Welancora Gallery’s new partnership with Nu Hotel. The Brooklyn Museum is also deconstructing the artist’s persona and hosting a new Georgia O’Keeffe exhibition. #MidnightMoment also kicks off a new film in Times Square—this April, Naoko Tosa’s “Sound of Ikebana” will take over the screens every night. Finally, come pick up my new book, “The Art of Spray Paint,” and check out its corresponding exhibition at Wallworks Gallery in the Bronx.
More on all the best events this way

Celebrities, Chelsea, Cool Listings, Historic Homes

323 West 21st Street, Cool Listings, Chelsea, Firehouse, Manhattan Rental, Historic Homes, Andy Warhol, carriage house

The Chelsea Firehouse at 323 West 21st Street would be an historic icon based on its origins alone, beginning in the late 19th century as an actual firehouse, built to accommodate a shiny new horse-drawn steam pumper engine (h/t Daytonian in Manhattan). The mid-Victorian era structure not only survived the ensuing decades, but in 1999, Architectural Digest featured the duplex shown here, by then one of three luxury apartments, calling it “indisputably one of a kind.” In the years between, the building was home to free-spirited performers and artists, including Andy Warhol and Philip Pearlstein who sought refuge here from seedy lodgings in the East Village. The designer-renovated, uniquely-configured 4,000 square-foot duplex in this storied building is now on the rental market for $33,000.

Find out more about this iconic home

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Upper East Side

A piece of New York City history has become (just slightly) more affordable to own yourself. The mid-century home at 101 East 63rd Street on the Upper East Side, known as the Halston House, is one of only three residences in Manhattan designed by famed architect Paul Rudolph. Not only is the architecture iconic, but after designer Halston moved in in 1974, he spent the next 15 years hosting parties attended by the likes of Andy Warhol, Liza Minnelli and Bianca Jagger. The former carriage house turned party destination turned luxury residence first hit the market for $40 million last year when it was said that contemporary art dealer Jeffrey Deitch was “angling” to make a deal. It must not have worked out, because it’s back on the market at a discount, asking $28 million.

Hear more about this iconic home

Celebrities, Recent Sales, Upper East Side

In addition to being one of the world’s most iconic artists, Andy Warhol appears to have had the Midas touch for real estate. In 2013, Warhol’s one-time townhouse on Lexington Avenue sold $5.5 million—he paid just $60,000 for it in 1959; then last October, the artist’s former Montauk compound, which he paid just $225,000 for in 1972, sold for a whopping $50 million; and now, as The Real Deal reports, the ramshackle Upper East Side studio he rented for paltry $150 a month has just traded hands for an incredible $9.9 million.

find out more

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.