yorkville

Celebrities, Cool Listings, yorkville

130 East End Avenue, Irving Berlin apartment, Irving Berlin Upper East Side, Yorkville co-ops

Growing up at the turn of the century on the Lower East Side, which was then home to the Yiddish Rialto (the largest Yiddish theater in the world at the time), is how legendary Hollywood songwriter Irving Berlin was first exposed to music and theater. But later in life, he moved his family uptown, first to Sutton Place and then to 130 East End Avenue, an Emory Roth-designed co-op in Yorkville right across from Carl Schurz Park. He lived in the penthouse duplex, which biographer Laurence Bergreen described as “a formal, stately dwelling with impressive views of the East River,” from 1931 to 1944. Now, the still-stately and “One of a Kind” home has just hit the market for $7.9 million.

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Cool Listings, Interiors, yorkville

Yorkville has long been considered one of Manhattan’s more affordable uptown neighborhoods–although that’s been changing in recent years–but here’s a neighborhood pad that’s not priced too high. For $695,000 you’ll get a one-bedroom duplex within the historic brownstone at 421 East 84th Street. The upper floor boasts two large windows and a wood burning fireplace, while the lower level has enough space to fit a king-sized bed and other furniture. Plus, it’s located just a few blocks away from the new Second Avenue subway station at 86th Street.

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Celebrities, Cool Listings, Upper East Side, yorkville

Ricky Martin might’ve gotten a bit too optimistic about Yorkville‘s Second Avenue Subway-influenced real estate boom, as Mansion Global reports that he’s chopped the price of his condo at 170 East End Avenue from $8.4 million to $7.1 million after just five months. This isn’t the first time the Latin pop star has had trouble unloading NYC real estate; in 2012 he put his condo in Noho’s 40 Bond on the rental market for $28,000/month. In 2014, he listed it for $8.3 million, but it didn’t find a buyer until a year and half later when it sold for the reduced price of $7.55 million.

Will he have better luck in Yorkville?

Transportation, Upper East Side, yorkville

Melissa DeRosa, the governor’s chief of staff, said Friday that Governor Andrew Cuomo was “cautiously optimistic” about a December opening for the long-awaited Second Avenue subway project, according to AM New York. After several weekly visits to the under-construction 72nd Street site, the governor appeared confident that the MTA would be able to meet the project’s December 31 deadline. U.S. representative Carolyn Maloney had also expressed confidence in the Second Avenue subway meeting its year-end deadline.

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Transportation, Upper East Side, yorkville

There are just seven weeks left for the MTA to wrap works on the 2nd Avenue Subway if they want to meet their December 31st deadline. According to the Times, at yesterday’s MTA board meeting, officials relayed that an “unprecedented” effort would be required in order to wrap Phase 1 of the project on time.

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affordable housing, Features, real estate trends, Upper East Side, yorkville

A look at Yorkville’s affordable housing decline

By Cait Etherington, Mon, October 10, 2016

Despite its location just a few blocks east of Park Avenue, Yorkville remains one of Manhattan’s most affordable neighborhoods south of 95th Street. The neighborhood’s reasonable prices partially reflect its reputation. Simply put, Yorkville has never been considered quaint or hip. Since its development in the nineteenth century, it has been best known for its German delis and unremarkable yet practical residential housing. Another factor that has historically kept the neighborhood’s housing prices below average is its high stock of rent stabilized units. Unfortunately, Yorkville’s reputation as a great place to find a bargain may soon be compromised. Recently released data on affordable housing stock in New York reveals that rent stabilized housing in Yorkville is rapidly declining. Indeed, between 2007 and 2014, the neighborhood lost more rent stabilized units than any other neighborhood in the city’s five boroughs.

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Features, History, Upper East Side, yorkville

Yorkville history, East 86th Street, Germantown

If you read 6sqft’s post about Kleindeutschland, or “Little Germany,” you know that in 1885 New York had the third largest German-speaking population in the world, outside of Vienna and Berlin, and the majority of those immigrants settled in what is today the heart of the East Village. You also know that the horrific General Slocum disaster in 1904 pushed the last of the Germans out of the area. And as promised, we’re here to tell you where that community went– Yorkville, then commonly known as Germantown.

The Upper East Side neighborhood, bounded by 79th and 96th streets and running from the east side of Third Avenue to the East River, exploded with immigrants from the former Prussian Empire in the early 20th century. Those looking for a fresh start after the tragedy saw opportunity in the many available jobs in Yorkville. Like the East Village, Yorkville still has many reminders of its German past, as well as still-thriving cultural spots.

Take a tour of Yorkville’s German history

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