yorkville

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, yorkville

Photo credit: David Paler for The Corcoran Group

How’s that for bragging rights? This incredible townhouse at 530 East 87th Street in Yorkville was built in the 1870s by the Astor family, and it later was owned by one of Theodore Roosevelt’s granddaughters. In more recent years, it underwent a designer renovation (it was even featured in Architectural Digest) that includes four wood-burning fireplaces with original mantles, lacquered walls, and a whimsical garden with climbing vines and lanterns.

Lots more to see

affordable housing, housing lotteries, yorkville

1775 york avenue, affordable housing, mitchell lama

Streetview of 1775 York Avenue; Map data © 2020 Google

Applications are currently being accepted to replenish the waitlist for affordable apartments in a luxury Yorkville building. Located at 1775 York Avenue, the building, known as The Brittany, is a high-rise located on the East River waterfront. Apartments–set aside for New Yorkers earning 40 percent of the area median income–include one- and two-bedroom apartments for $728/month and $868/month, respectively.

How to apply

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Upper East Side, yorkville

Photo of Carl Schurz Park by CityRealty

In 2017, Sky Management filed plans to build a 22-story Passive House rental building at 515 East 86th Street, just off York Avenue near Carl Schurz Park and the East River. Designed by Arquitectonica with EP Engineering, the environmentally friendly building has tons of amenities, some of which include a pet spa, dog run, co-working space, fitness center, and yoga studio. In terms of outdoor space, there’s a grilling terrace, landscaped interior courtyard, and roof deck. The 35 affordable units in the building are available to those earning 40, 60, 80, and 130 percent of the area median income and range from $747/month studios to $3,123 two-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify here

Art, Events, yorkville

All photos by Michael Appleton/NYC Mayor’s Office

A new art exhibition is open at Gracie Mansion, the fourth and final installation of Mayor Bill de Blasio and First Lady Chirlane McCray’s tenure. Catalyst: Art and Social Justice, which will also be the largest ever hosted at the historic home in Yorkville, features more than 75 works created by over 50 artists since the 1960s. With a focus on inclusion, the exhibit explores the connection between art, justice, and the social change movements behind it all.

Get the details

Cool Listings, yorkville

321 East 89th Street, cool listings, upper east side, yorkville

Image courtesy of Halstead.

Asking $325,000, this cozy co-op’s Yorkville location at 321 East 89th Street between Central Park and Carl Schurz park means you’ve got a choice between the two green spaces–and the new Q line stops three blocks away. The tucked-away top-floor studio is served by an elevator, so getting home doesn’t have to be a workout.

See more

Featured Story

Features, History, yorkville

The hopping history of German breweries in Yorkville

By Lucie Levine, Thu, October 10, 2019

Jacob Ruppert’s Knickerbocker Beer, 1912, via Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division

If you spent the first weekend of October hoisting lager and Oomph-ing it up for Oktoberfest, then you joined a long and proud tradition of German beer production and consumption in New York City. In fact, New York’s German-owned breweries were once the largest beer-making operations in the country, and the brewers themselves grew into regional and national power-players, transforming Major League Baseball, holding elected office, and, perhaps most importantly, sponsoring goat beauty pageants in Central Park. While brewing flourished in both Manhattan and Brooklyn throughout the 19th century, the city’s largest breweries were clustered in Yorkville. In fact, much of the neighborhood’s storied German cultural history can be traced to the rise of brewing in the area, and the German-language shops, cultural institutions and social halls that sprang up to cater to the brewery workers.

Get more Hopping History Here!

Cool Listings, Upper East Side, yorkville

340 East 83rd Street, upper east side, yorkville, cool listings, outdoor spaces, studios

This Yorkville studio at 340 East 83rd Street may not be spacious inside, but the private backyard paradise just outside of the living room window is a study in hidden charm in the city.  Asking $425,000, the cozy co-op spans 400 square feet of quiet, back-of-the-building efficiency.

More of that fabulous patio, this way

affordable housing, Upper East Side, yorkville

Holmes Towers, NYCHA, Fetner Properties

Previous rendering of the original project; Via NYCHA

The New York City Housing Authority has ditched plans to build a private 47-story apartment building on top of a playground on the Upper East Side, agency officials said Friday. The original plan called for a 300-unit tower to replace the playground at the Holmes Tower public housing complex with half of the units affordable and the other half at market-rate, the latter meant to raise funds for repairs at the tower. The new plan for the site will increase the number of market-rate apartments in order to collect more money, NYCHA officials told THE CITY.

Get the details

Landmarks Preservation Commission, Upper East Side, yorkville

Photos courtesy of the LPC

Members of the Landmarks Preservation Commission voted Tuesday in favor of landmarking two historic sites in Yorkville–the First Hungarian Reformed Church of New York at 344 East 69th Street and the National Society of Colonial Dames in the State of New York at 215 East 71st Street. As 6sqft previously reported, the Hungarian Reformed Church was designed in 1916 by esteemed architect Emery Roth as one of his few religious buildings and his only Christian structure. The Colonial Dames headquarters is housed in an intact Georgian Revival-style mansion built in 1929.

Find out more

Celebrities, Cool Listings, yorkville

130 East End Avenue, Yorkville, Upper East Side, Penthouses, Irving Berlin

American songwriter Irving Berlin moved into the duplex at 130 East End Avenue—an Emory Roth-designed co-op in Yorkville right across from Carl Schurz Park— in 1931, where he went on to write hits like “I’ve Got My Love to Keep Me Warm” and “Say It Isn’t So.” As Berlin’s biographer Laurence Bergreen described, the formal residence featured antiques and floor-to-ceiling bookshelves that “quietly suggested the home of [a] wealthy, cultivated businessman possessed of exacting, if severe, taste.” Though the Berlin’s moved out in 1944, the stately residence with East River views retained it’s formal decor when the unit last hit the market in 2017 for $7,900,000. Over the past two years, the apartment has undergone a modern renovation and is back seeking a much reduced $3,995,000.

Get the tour

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