Meatpacking District

Construction Update, Design, Meatpacking District

Pier 55, Heatherwick Studios, Diller

Construction photo via CityRealty; Rendering via Heatherwick Studio

Construction has moved along quite nicely at Pier 55, the on-again, off-again public park project funded by billionaire businessman Barry Diller planned for the Hudson River. While there was not much to show when the park broke ground in April, photos recently taken by CityRealty reveal new concrete pylons arranged in various heights. These will act as the wave-shaped floating park’s support structure.

See the photos

Meatpacking District, Urban Design

pier 55, barry diller, thomas heatherwick

Rendering by Pier55 Inc/Heatherwick Studio

After years of drama, during which the project was declared dead, then given new life, construction on the public park anchored in the Hudson River (also known as Pier 55 and Diller Island), is now moving forward as evidenced by a site photo taken by CityRealty this week showing two walkways leading to the pier from Hudson River Park now in place. As 6sqft reported last October, the Pier 55 project spearheaded by media mogul Barry Diller was rebooted with Diller’s renewed commitment, complete with the backing of his recent legal foes, former ointment-fly Douglas Durst and Governor Andrew Cuomo.

More pictures this way

Architecture, Meatpacking District, New Developments, Starchitecture

40 tenth avenue, solar carve, jeanne gang, gang studios, Aurora, high line, meatpacking, new developments, commercial developments, architecture

Renderings © Neoscape for Studio Gang Architects

Since 6sqft reported just over a year ago on the beginnings of the building formerly known as the Solar Carve tower by celebrated architect Jeanne Gang at 40 Tenth Avenue, the new High Line-hugging addition has been quietly rising. Now, the 10-story commercial tower has officially topped out, and we’ve got the construction photos and new renderings to prove it.

Renderings and photos this way

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Meatpacking District

Though the couple sold the Meatpacking pad at 66 Ninth Avenue for $3.8 million in 2015 and acquired a stately Clinton Hill mansion, this corner two-bedroom loft in the Porter House condominium is just as lovely at its new rental price of $13,500 a month, as the Post reports. The then-engaged couple (they’re married now) sold the home in just five months.

Have another look

Art, Meatpacking District

A post shared by Banksy (@banksy) on

Elusive graffiti artist Banksy has graced the streets of New York City once again with a new bewhiskered art offering, this time a rat scurrying inside a clock on the side of a former bank at 101 West 14th Street; the building is slated for demolition in a few months. Banksy posted news of his newest addition via his Instagram account yesterday.

More to come?

Cool Listings, Interiors, Meatpacking District

799 washington street, sotheby's, meatpacking district

The listing calls this building at 799 Washington Street “one of the last grand historic structures in prime meatpacking district.” And it could be yours for a cool $75 million. Turning it into a mega-mansion, however, will require serious work. (Though there’s no lack for inspiration when it comes to mega-mansions in New York.) The 23,000-square-foot structure is currently configured as a high-end film studio and commercial space, topped off with a residential penthouse unit. Other suggestions to any deep-pocketed buyer, per the listing, include conversions to a boutique hotel or a multi-unit, live/work building.

Take a look inside

Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Policy

Rendering via Pier55, Inc

Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer appointed Douglas Durst on Friday to the board of the Hudson River Park Trust, a group he has frequently criticized over their proposed Pier55 project. Durst admitted last year to funding a lawsuit to stop the trust’s plan for an off-shore park on the Hudson River. While billionaire businessman Barry Diller, who is funding the $250 million project, halted construction in September, the plan was restored a month later, with pressure and financial help from Gov. Andrew Cuomo. Brewer told Crain’s that Durst didn’t volunteer, she asked him to join the board. “I think he loves the park,” she said.

Find out more

Featured Story

Features, GVSHP, History, Meatpacking District, photography, West Village 

Rare photos of the High Line being demolished in the 1960s tell the story of a changing West Village

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, October 26, 2017

Crane with wrecking ball mounted on the trestle. Photo by Peter H. Fritsch (1962). Photo courtesy of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation/Fritsch Family Collection.

Few structures have had a more far-reaching impact upon the West Village and Chelsea than the High Line. Its construction in 1934, then partial demolition in the early ’60s, and final preservation and conversion into a park a decade ago have profoundly shaped the way these neighborhoods have changed over the last 85 years. And while photos of its heyday and those of it today as an internationally recognized public space are plenty, few exist of those interim years. But GVSHP recently acquired some wonderful images of the High Line being demolished in 1962 at Perry Street, donated by the Fritsch Family who lived nearby at 141 Perry Street.

The Fritschs’ photos say a lot about how the High Line, and its demolition, changed the West Village. It’s apparent from the images just how much more industrial, and gritty the Far West Village was in those days. But it also shows how the demolition of the High Line left a huge gap in this unpretentious neighborhood, which housed both disappearing industry and a diverse and vital residential community.

See the other photos and learn the whole history

Meatpacking District, Policy, Urban Design

BARRY DILLER, DOUGLAS DURST, GOV. ANDREW CUOMO, HUDSON RIVER PARK TRUST, PIER 55

Photo: Pier 55, Inc./Heatherwick Studio.

In September, 6sqft reported that billionaire IAC Chairman Barry Diller was giving up on the $250 million project that promised to bring a futuristic offshore park and cultural destination to the Hudson River’s dilapidated Pier 54. Since its beginnings in 2014, the seemingly ill-fated project, known as Pier 55 (or sometimes “Diller Park”), was beleaguered by opposing factions–eventually revealed to be funded by prominent New York real estate developer Douglas Durst–that blocked its progress at every turn. Diller, who had imagined the project as a new Manhattan waterfront icon to rival the nearby High Line, had had enough. In a cautiously optimistic turnaround, it was announced Wednesday that the media mogul–now backed by his recent legal foes and Durst in addition to Governor Andrew Cuomo–was renewing his commitment to move ahead with the project, according to Crain’s. Diller said in a statement, “I have had countless people tell me how much they were looking forward to having this new pier, and how unfortunate were the circumstances of its cancellation.”

So what happened?

Meatpacking District, Policy, Urban Design

Barry Diller pulls the plug on $250M Pier 55 offshore park

By Michelle Cohen, Thu, September 14, 2017

Photo: Pier 55, Inc./Heatherwick Studio.

Barry Diller, the billionaire chairman of IAC, announced he’s killing the $250 million project that promised to bring a futuristic offshore park and cultural site to the Hudson River’s dilapidated Pier 54. 6sqft previously covered the unfolding saga of the ill-fated project, known as Pier 55 (or sometimes as “Diller Park”), as opposing factions continually blocked its progress and were eventually revealed to be funded by prominent New York real estate developer Douglas Durst. According to the New York Times, Diller said Wednesday that his commitment to build the undulating pier would be coming to an end—an inglorious one for a bold plan that some, and certainly Diller himself, saw as a new Manhattan waterfront icon to rival the nearby High Line.

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