Meatpacking District

Design, Meatpacking District

gansevoort peninsula, meatpacking district, nyc beach

Credit: James Corner Field Operations, courtesy of the Hudson River Park Trust

What at first appeared a lofty dream is now closer to reality. The Hudson River Park Trust on Thursday announced three requests for proposals for the construction of Manhattan’s first public beach. The project includes a 5.5-acre public park on the Gansevoort Peninsula in the Meatpacking District that would be home to a resilient “beach” with kayak access, a sports field, scenic lounge spots, and a large public art installation.

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Art, Events, Meatpacking District

Photo of Little Island under construction in October 2020; Photo: © CityRealty

Developers of the new public park under construction in the Hudson River announced on Wednesday the participants of its first-ever artists-in-residence program. Artists Ayodele Casel, Tina Landeau, Michael McElroy, and PigPen Theatre Co., will perform, direct, and/or curate cultural events for Little Island, the two-acre offshore park at Hudson River Park’s Pier 55 expected to open this spring.

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Art, Meatpacking District

All photos © Brake Through Media

American sculptor Tom Fruin has brought his famous “Icon” series to Gansevoort Plaza in the Meatpacking District. The installation, which is a welcome dose of color in the cold winter months, consists of one large “house” and seven smaller “satellite homes,” all made in the artist’s signature stained glass-esque design. During the day, the sun shines through the glass, casting colorful refelections, and at night, the pieces project multi-colored LED lights onto the cobblestone plaza.

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History, maps, Meatpacking District

13th avenue, 13th avenue manhattan, meatpacking district

1885 map showing 13th Avenue, via the New York Public Library

You may be scratching your head at the mention of the 13th Avenue in Manhattan, but it does exist–and it’s the shortest avenue in the whole city with a fascinating history behind it. The minuscule stretch covers prime Meatpacking District real estate, just west of 11th Avenue and between Little West 12th Street and Gansevoort Street. The single block across the West Side Highway is unmarked, but officially known as Gansevoort Peninsula. The avenue was created by the city in 1837, and in no way was intended to be so short. In fact, by the mid-1800s 13th Avenue encompassed nearly 15 blocks and was planned to stretch all the way up to 135th Street. But the block never left Chelsea and was mostly destroyed by the city at the turn of the century.

Read all about the life and death of the Avenue

Design, Meatpacking District

Little Island in May 2020 © CityRealty

The much-anticipated offshore public park in the Hudson River is coming together, with its concrete tulip-shaped pots in place and the first trees planted. New photos of “Little Island” at Pier 55 show construction progressing ahead of its scheduled spring 2021 opening. The two-acre park, designed by Heatherwick Studio and MNLA, is meant to resemble a leaf floating on water, with its concrete base sitting above the river.

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Design, Meatpacking District

Little Island, Pier 55, Hudson River Park, Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects, Barry Diller

Rendering courtesy of Little Island

The offshore park currently under construction in the Hudson River has been officially christened “Little Island,” the Diller-von Furstenberg Family Foundation announced Wednesday. The Pier 55 project, which is being funded by billionaire Barry Diller and overseen by the Hudson River Park Trust, includes over two acres of public green space across a wave-shaped structure near West 13th Street in the Meatpacking District. First proposed in 2014 for $35 million, Little Island is expected to cost $250 million and open in the spring of 2021.

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Featured Story

Features, Meatpacking District, photography, The urban lens

All photos © Jonathan Flaum. Photo above: High Line Color 1. June 2005.

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

Photographer Jonathan Flaum started going up on the abandoned High line in the ’80s, when it was full of overgrown wildlife, to see some of his friends’ graffiti work and find a quiet escape from the city. In the late ’90s, he heard about plans to demolish the former elevated train tracks and decided to start photographing the structure. Soon thereafter, Joshua David and Robert Hammond started Friends of the High Line, then a small, grassroots organization advocating for its preservation and adaptive reuse into a park. When they built their website, they incorporated Jonathan’s photos to provide a behind-the-scenes look for those who weren’t as adventurous to venture up there.

The park’s first phase officially opened in 2009 and to celebrate its 10-year anniversary, Jonathan has shared with us his collection of photos. Ahead, hear from him on his experiences with the High Line and see how far this NYC icon has come.

See all the photos

Architecture, Construction Update, Meatpacking District, New Developments, Starchitecture

40 tenth avenue, studio gang, jeanne gang

Photo © Timothy Schenck

The Meatpacking District gained a new architectural landmark this week. Construction of Studio Gang’s 40 Tenth Avenue is officially complete, making it Jeanne Gang and her firm’s first New York City building. Nicknamed the Solar Carve Tower because the way its facade seems to have been “sculpted by the angles of the sun,” the 10-story, High Line-facing office tower is designed to allow for lots of sunlight without casting shadows on the neighboring green space.

Details this way

Meatpacking District, Urban Design

gansevoort peninsula, meatpacking district, nyc beach

Credit: James Corner Field Operations, courtesy of the Hudson River Park Trust

The Hudson River Park Trust unveiled on Wednesday a preliminary concept for its plan to bring a public beach to Manhattan. The Meatpacking District site, known as the Gansevoort Peninsula, measures about 5.5 acres on the waterfront and formerly served as a parking lot for the city’s sanitation department. The new park will feature a beach area with kayak access, a sports field, a salt marsh, and areas to picnic and lounge.

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Art, Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District

The High Line’s final section, the Spur, is open

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, June 11, 2019

the high line, the spur, the plinth, public art, nyc parks

Photo by Timothy Schenck, courtesy of the High Line.

The High Line’s newest section, the Spur, opened to the public last week following a ribbon-cutting celebration on Tuesday. Elected officials, artists, advocates, supporters, community members, and architects involved in the project were on hand for a speaking program that welcomed visitors to the new space. The Spur–the last section of the original elevated rail to be converted into public space–extends east along West 30th Street and ends above 10th Avenue; it’s also home to the High Line Plinth, the first site on the High Line dedicated to a rotating series of contemporary art commissions. Simone Leigh’s “Brick House” is the first Plinth commission.

Photos and more, this way

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