Meatpacking District

Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Policy, Urban Design

6sqft reported in March on the latest developments in the on-again-off-again status of the $200 million Barry Diller-funded offshore park/performing arts center proposed for Pier 55 on the Hudson River; though construction began last November, opponents of the project, led by the City Club of New York, gained a victory in the form of a ruling by Judge Lorna G. Schofield that agreed with group’s claim that the Army Corps of Engineers had not conducted a sufficient environmental review on how the 2.4-acre park would affect fish and wildlife. The judge ordered that work stop at the site and called for a review of alternatives for building along Hudson River Park, a maritime sanctuary. Now, the New York Times reports that the Corps of Engineers, with the project’s sponsor, the Hudson River Park Trust, has filed an appeal of the decision.

And what about that Diller-Durst feud

Featured Story

Features, History, Meatpacking District, photography, The urban lens

6sqft’s ongoing series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation shares archival images of the gritty Meatpacking District from the 1980s to early 2000s. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

“Few parts of New York City have transformed as dramatically in the last decade or so as the Meatpacking District. Changes in the area are physical as well as spiritual. What was once a deserted ghost town by day, nightlife, sex club, and prostitution hub by night, and bustling workaday center of the Meatpacking industry from early morning to noon is now a glitzy, glamorized center of shopping, dining, tourism, strolling, and arts consumption,” says Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation. The organization recently released a collection of archival photos of the neighborhood’s post-industrial grit, “before the Whitney, before the High Line, before Apple and Diane von Furstenberg, even before Sex and the City discovered the neighborhood.” Ahead, 6sqft shares these images, from the 1980s to the mid-2000s, which document the major transformation that’s taken place in just the past decade.

See all the photos here

Architecture, Meatpacking District, New Developments, Starchitecture

The Warehouse, High Line architecture, Elijah Equities, Morris Adjmi, 520 West 20th Street

Morris Adjmi is no stranger to converting and reinterpreting industrial architecture, so it’s fitting that Elijah Equities tapped the “contextual king” to redevelopment the Carolina Manufacturing Company’s former distribution facility and apparel-manufacturing space at 520 West 20th Street, right next to the High Line in Chelsea (h/t ArchDaily). For the project, known as “The Warehouse,” Adjmi will add a three-story, steel-framed addition to the current 65,000-square-foot structure, resulting in 100,000 square feet of office and retail space with more than 18,000 square feet of rooftop and outdoor amenity space.

All the renderings and details ahead

Featured Story

Features, History, Meatpacking District

Today it seems like there’s a new food hall popping up every day, but one of the first incarnations of this trend was at Chelsea Market, when Irwin Cohen and Vandenberg Architects transformed the former Nabisco factory in the 1990s into an office building, television production facility, and food-related retail hub. New York City history buffs likely know that this is where a certain famous cookie was invented, but there are plenty of other fun facts about the location that are much less well known. Therefore, 6sqft has rounded up the top 10 most intriguing secrets of Chelsea Market.

Find out everything here

Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Policy, Urban Design

If you thought the roller coaster that is Pier 55 was over since construction began in November, you may not want to step off the ride just yet. Just yesterday, a federal judge ruled in favor of the City Club of New York, who took legal action against the $200 million Barry Diller-funded offshore park way back in the summer of 2015. As reported by the Times, Judge Lorna G. Schofield agreed with the group’s claim that the Army Corps of Engineers had not conducted a sufficient environmental review on how the 2.4-acre park would affect fish and wildlife. She ordered that work stop at the site and called for a review of alternatives for building along Hudson River Park, a maritime sanctuary.

Get the whole legal saga

Architecture, Green Design, Meatpacking District, New Developments, Starchitecture

Renderings © Neoscape for Studio Gang Architects

Just yesterday, 6sqft shared the news that Jeanne Gang‘s first ground-up project in NYC–the Solar Carve Tower at 40 Tenth Avenue–had begun construction along the High Line. Now, the Post shares new renderings of the jewel-like, glassy structure, which is so named for its employment of the firm’s strategy that uses the sun’s angles to shape a building. Along with these views of its chiseled edges, connection to the park, terraces, and interior spaces, comes word that developers Aurora Capital and William Gottlieb Real Estate have tapped Bruce Mosler of Cushman & Wakefield to begin leasing the 139,000-square-foot, 12-story boutique office building in anticipation of its 2019 opening.

Lots more details and renderings ahead

Architecture, Construction Update, Green Design, Meatpacking District, Starchitecture

For an architect who had yet to break into the NYC scene, Jeanne Gang is now moving full steam ahead. Her firm, Studio Gang, received LPC approvals back in October for their much-hyped, $340 million Museum of Natural History expansion, and now, CityRealty tells us that construction has begun on their razor-edged glass tower along the High Line. Dubbed “Solar Carve Tower” for the firm’s strategy that “uses the incident angles of the sun’s ray to form the gem-like shape,” the 12-story office building will be Gang’s first ground-up project when completed.

Find out more

Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Urban Design

Despite the fact that the 535 concrete piles that will support the planned undulating base of the Pier 55 offshore park have already been erected, the Hudson River Park Trust is now looking towards a flatter design. The Architect’s Newspaper obtained a copy of a permit modification request that the group submitted to the Army Corps of Engineers that reduces the park’s overall size slightly from 2.7 to 2.4 acres and replaces many of the hollow pentagonal pots that would have sat on top of the columns with “a flat structural base sandwiches between the piles and the landscaping.”

Find out the reason for the major change

Chelsea, condos, Meatpacking District, New Developments, Starchitecture

the eleventh, bjarke ingels, BIG, HFZ Capital Group, 76 Eleventh Avenue,

When HFZ Capital Group chairman Ziel Feldman needed a bold design for what will be Chelsea‘s largest development in more than a decade, he knew the very-visible, block-long site wanted nothing short of an architectural icon to house the future 950,000-square-foot mix of parking, retail and office space, a 137-room Six Senses Hotels Resorts Spa and 240 condominium apartments. So it should come as no surprise that Bjarke Ingels’ BIG was chosen to design what would be the firm’s second Hudson River-front tower (after Via 57 West). Straddling the High Line and offering sunset river views, the two towers penned by the Danish wunderkind sit atop a four-floor base at 76 Eleventh Avenue, rising to 28 and 38 floors, respectively. CityRealty now brings us a collection of new views and a concept development slideshow of the $1.9 billion project recently published by BIG on their website.

See new images from the slideshow and some scintillating site prep

adaptive reuse, Architecture, Chelsea, Landscape Architecture, Major Developments, Meatpacking District

pier 57, google, google expansion, anthony bourdain, !MELK LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN, GOOGLE, HANDEL ARCHITECTS, HUDSON RIVER PARK, HUDSON RIVER PARK TRUST, PIER 57, RXR REALTY, YOUNG WOO & ASSOCIATES

Pier 57 now showing some skin; Photo: CityRealty

Work is moving along at the waterfront development that is rehabilitating and revitalizing Pier 57, Manhattan’s new “SuperPier;” newly-installed, canted glass panels can be seen along the pier’s rows of exterior columns, CityRealty reports. The $350 million transformation of the former freight terminal, a joint venture by Young Woo & Associates and RXR will include 250,000 square feet of offices for Google, a 170,000-square-foot food market curated by Anthony Bourdain and provide an elevated two-acre park with a rooftop movie and performance amphitheater. The project’s design is being handled by Handel Architects and !Melk Landscape Architecture and Urban Design.

Check out new construction photos

Chelsea, Cool Listings, Meatpacking District

221 West 14th Street, Cool listings, Chelsea, Meatpacking, loft bed, terrace, studio

This Chelsea-meets-Meatpacking studio at 221 West 14th Street checks the boxes for charm, neighborhood amenities and convenience, and it possesses that elusive bonus item: an attractive outdoor space with at least enough room for a rosé al fresco. For $845,000 it’s not exactly a steal, though if neighborhood comps are a factor—which of course they are—then it becomes one. The second-floor townhouse condominium’s layout works, allowing the space to be a small studio, yet solving the problem of having your bed next to the fridge.

What else do we love about it?

Construction Update, Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Urban Design

Current view of Pier55 site, via 6sqft

Now that the Barry Diller-funded Pier 55 offshore park can proceed freely, the Wall Street Journal took a look at how construction is progressing on the $200 million project. Currently, the 535 concrete columns, each three feet wide and ranging from 70 to 200 feet long, that will support the 2.75-acre park have been erected, poking out of the Hudson River amidst the historic wooden piles that once supported Pier 54, where the Titanic was supposed to dock (these will remain to sustain marine life development). On top of them will be pots, “hollow pentagonal forms” that weigh as much as 60 tons and will be “linked with concrete to create a rectangular platform of about 104,000 square feet.”

More new details this way

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Meatpacking District

Don’t worry, this interesting trio of notables didn’t live in this Meatpacking District condo at the same time. “South Park” co-creator Trey Parker lived in the loft-style, three-bedroom spread at the Porter House during the initial run of his Tony-winning Broadway show “Book of Mormon,” according to the Post, who also note that Academy Award-winning director Jason Batemen, best known for “Juno” and “Up in the Air,” as well as uber-conservative political commentator Glenn Beck have called this apartment home. And it’s currently on the market for $4.9 million or as a $13,900/month rental.

See the rest

Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Policy

Pier 55, Hudson River Park Trust, Barry Diller

After nearly a year and a half of yo-yo-ing back and forth between stop work orders and lawsuits, the Barry Diller-funded Pier 55 park can finally move ahead freely. The New York Law Journal reports that yesterday the state Court of Appeals denied the City Club of New York’s appeal of September’s ruling in favor of Pier 55 and the Hudson River Park Trust (HRPT) that said construction could continue on the 2.75-acre offshore park, dismissing the opponents’ claims that the park failed to go through adequate environmental impact evaluations and violated the public trust doctrine by planning to host private events.

What this means for Pier 55

condos, Meatpacking District, New Developments, Starchitecture

NYC starchitecture, 76 Eleventh Avenue, Bjarke Ingels, BIG Architecture, HFZ Capital, High Line towers, The Eleventh

In a press release announcing that HFZ Capital Group is bringing a 137-key luxury Six Senses hotel and spa to Bjarke Ingels‘ pair of travertine-and-bronze towers along the High Line, 6sqft has learned that the $1.9 billion project at 76 Eleventh Avenue will officially be known as The Eleventh. The hotel announcement –which is interesting because in December 2015, the original plans for a hotel were replaced with office space–also came with several new renderings of the 28- and 38-story buildings, which are distinguished by their twisting silhouettes, glowing crowns, and two amenity-filled podium bridges that connect them.

More new views and details ahead

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