Greenpoint

affordable housing, Greenpoint, housing lotteries

Renderings of The Greenpoint courtesy of Neoscape

Applications are now being accepted for 140 affordable units at The Greenpoint, the neighborhood’s first skyscraper and current tallest building. The 40-story residential building, located on the Brooklyn waterfront at 23 India Street, boasts amenities like a bike room, sports court, children’s playroom, outdoor entertainment space, fitness center, a public promenade and more. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 40 and 60 percent of the area median income can apply for affordable apartments ranging from a $613/month studio to a $1,230/month two-bedroom.

Find out if you qualify here

Brooklyn, Design, Green Design, Greenpoint

the greenpoint, brooklyn, waterfront development

Rendering of The Greenpoint via +TOM

The Greenpoint, a 40-story waterfront rental and condo tower and the neighborhood’s tallest building, topped out in February, launched sales in July and now, is a few months away from getting a public 275-foot long promenade at its waterfront site. After nearly a decade of delays, the Brooklyn walkway, the first of its kind to be privately built in Greenpoint, will open in the spring. According to the Wall Street Journal, the park will total 29,500 square feet, including a 4,000-square-foot playground with lots of trees and colorful oval panels above.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Greenpoint, Interiors

114 india street, greenpoint, rental, outdoor space, halstead

Every winter, New Yorkers mourn the outdoor space they can’t enjoy due to cold weather. This Greenpoint apartment has solved that problem, by installing a fire pit within a charming private patio. This jealousy-inducing outdoor space is tacked onto a two-bedroom duplex unit from 114 India Street, a condo built in 2008. It’s being offered as a short-term rental–completely furnished, with utilities and weekly housekeeping included–for $6,000 a month.

Now see the interior

Greenpoint, Transportation, Urban Design

As of 8 a.m. Sunday morning, the old, traffic-snarling Kosciuszko Bridge is no more. The decaying bridge, which was officially closed in April when the eastbound span of its replacement opened, crumbled and fell to the ground in a matter of minutes in a process known as “energetic felling, the city’s first ever implosion of a major bridge using explosives.

See the full video footage of the bridge getting blown to bits

Greenpoint, Transportation, Urban Design

Kosciuszko bridge officially getting blown up this Sunday

By Michelle Cohen, Fri, September 29, 2017

Kosciuszko Bridge

Out with the old: The new Kosciuszko Bridge in the foreground, with the old bridge behind it. Image: Wikimedia commons.

The long-delayed demolition of two old sections of the Kosciuszko Bridge has been scheduled for this Sunday, October 1, according to AM New York. The demolition will herald the first stage of the $825 million construction of the new Kosciuszko Bridge. The first section of the new bridge was opened to eastbound and westbound traffic in April. The implosion of the 78-year-old bridge–still subject to change depending on weather conditions–has been scheduled for 8 a.m. according to Councilman Stephen Levin’s office.

Find out more

affordable housing, Greenpoint, Policy

View of the vacant hospital complex, via Google Street View

It’s been 35 years since the Greenpoint Hospital shut its doors, since which time the city has tried and failed to convert the vacant 146,100-square-foot complex into affordable housing. But Mayor de Blasio, explaining that the “the need for affordable housing in Greenpoint and Williamsburg is too high to leave even one stone unturned,” will now seek proposals from developers to transform the site into anywhere between 300 to 600 below-market rate apartments and supportive housing, along with green space, commercial space, and a relocated 200-bed shelter and clinic (h/t DNAinfo).

The past and future of the site

Cool Listings, Greenpoint, Interiors

184 Calyer Street, Greenpoint, Cool Listings, townhouses, outdoor space,

Greenpoint has quietly over the past decade become one of Brooklyn’s most livable and lovable neighborhoods; its waterfront location, a diverse family-friendly vibe, proximity to McCarren Park and Williamsburg, and exciting new developments on the way are just a few of the reasons why. Townhouses here are rarer than lofts and condos, but they do pop up for lucky buyers, and this three-story home at 184 Calyer Street, asking $2.395 million, is a move-in ready example. The fully-renovated two-family house with a private garden is comprised of a spacious owners’ duplex and a good-sized one-bedroom apartment with its own outdoor space.

Give the G line a try

Bushwick, Greenpoint, real estate trends, Transportation, Williamsburg

G train, NYC subway

G Train at Court Square via Wikipedia

In response to the looming 15th-month L train shutdown, which will affect its nearly 225,000 daily riders beginning April 2019, real estate developers have started looking at Williamsburg’s hip and slightly cheaper neighbors, Greenpoint and South Williamsburg. Both areas sit nearby the G, J, M and Z trains, and in the past have offered a variety of housing options at cheaper prices. According to the New York Times, as developers begin their plunge into Greenpoint, sites along these train lines have become pricier and more difficult to lock down.
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affordable housing, Greenpoint, housing lotteries

The waitlist is open for $2,611/month two-bedroom apartments at Greenpoint‘s super-trendy rental Eleven33, which goes out of its way to check all the boxes in terms of “Brooklyn living” — from a cyber café with an espresso bar to a landscaped rooftop terrace to a fitness center complete with CrossFit equipment. The affordable housing lottery is open to middle-income households of two, three, and four people earning between $106,080 and $158,550 annually.

Find out if you qualify here

Architecture, Design, Greenpoint

London-based collective Assemble works across art, architecture, and design “to address the typical disconnection between the public and the process by which places are made.” They’ve employed this philosophy at their first U.S. project–a temporary clay-extruding factory in the courtyard of Greenpoint’s A/D/O creative hub, known as “A Factory As It Might Be.” As Dezeen explains, the firm first built only a steel roof on top of the brick walls, but after acquiring an industrial clay extruder and electric kiln and finding that of all the vessels and homewares being created the tiles were the most successful, they decided to use the ceramic tiles to create a colorful, geometric facade.

Find out more about the project here

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