City Living

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City Living, Features

The 15 best spots in NYC for outdoor grilling

By Devin Gannon, Fri, May 26, 2017

With Memorial Day Weekend just around the corner, it’s hard not to imagine the taste of savory barbecue food like hot dogs and hamburgers, chicken wings and corn on the cob. And while our tiny apartments in New York City may not always be the greatest spots to host a barbecue, the city’s parks provide some of the best places to get your grill on this summer. Ahead, 6sqft rounded up 15 of the best parks to host outdoor barbecues, from old standby Prospect Park to less known locales like Clove Lakes Park in Staten Island.

Find out the best BBQ spots in your neighborhood

City Living, Technology

As a tribute to New York City, Breather, a company with rentable workplaces worldwide, developed a website that lets you listen to the sounds of different city neighborhoods and iconic Big Apple locations. Called Sounds of New York, ambient noises play in the background to help workers concentrate on their daily tasks. Enhance your productivity by listening to the atmospheric sounds of the Strand bookstore, McSorley’s Ale House, Zabar’s, the Comedy Cellar, the Oculus, or Harlem’s Apollo Theater all from the comfort of your office.

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City Living, Policy

In reference to a movement that has been gaining momentum in recent months, Grubstreet reports on a petition to repeal the city’s archaic–and racially motivated in its origins–1926 Cabaret Law that requires an establishment to have a city license if more than three patrons want to move their feet. According to New York City Department of Consumer Affairs, “A Cabaret License is required for any business that sells food and/or beverages to the public and allows patron dancing in a room, place, or space.” The law, which prohibits any and all dancing in a business establishment without a Cabaret License, was originally aimed at jazz clubs born during the Harlem Renaissance.

Racist origins and selective enforcement

City Living, Transportation

In the “ideas from abroad” column, the Metropolitan Transit Authority will begin offering pregnant riders a better shot at getting a seat on packed subway cars by way of a big yellow and blue button that reads “Baby on Board” and bears the MTA logo in an attempt to encourage passengers to offer up their seats, the NYTimes reports. Reportedly the idea began in London, where the underground has had a similar program in place for pregnant riders since 2005. Kate Middleton, now Duchess of Cambridge, got some public attention when she wore one on the Tube in 2013. Officials said about 130,000 buttons are distributed on the London transit system every year.

Worse than manspreading

City Living, maps, Neighborhoods

There’s almost no end to the amount of information you can find out about folks in your neighborhood, from two-legged to four, right down to which streets harbor the biggest poop non-scoopers. Now you can find out what name your neighbor’s pet is likely to answer to (h/t Brick Underground): A newly-released official NYC dog name map shows the city’s most popular dog names as well as the most common names unique to each neighborhood, based on 2016 registered dog license data.

More doggie demographics this way

City Living, Transportation

Citi Bikes, Maps, Data, bike share

A new before-and-after study shows that in New York City thousands of potential bus rides are likely happening by bike instead, reports CityLab. Recent research published in a new journal article on bike sharing stations along city bus routes, by Kayleigh Campbell and Candace Brakewood, an assistant professor of civil engineering at the City College of New York, revealed that for every thousand Citi Bike docks situated along Brooklyn and Manhattan bus routes, bus trips dropped by 2.42 percent. The study includes trips made between May 2012 and July 2014 and controls for a wide variety of factors in order to show the impact of bike sharing on bus ridership.
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City Living, maps

Designed for the busybody in all of us, a new interactive map provides information about our neighbors’ finances. Designed by student loan marketplace LendEDU, it shows the average income level, credit card and student loan debt, mortgage debt, and auto loan balances in every NYC neighborhood (h/t Brick Underground). While the Upper West Side, Tribeca, Battery Park and Lenox Hill all made the list for highest-earning areas, the highest credit ratings were all in Queens; Breezy Point, Douglaston and Clearview all had some of the best credit scores.

The ‘hoods with the highest student loan debt may surprise you

Featured Story

apartment living 101, City Living, Features

After finally finding that perfect NYC apartment, it’s time to prove you can actually pay for it. Many NYC newbies and even natives can’t meet landlords’ strict criteria, like having a high credit score or a salary that equals 40-45 times the monthly rent, for example. Which is where guarantors come in–a co-signer who guarantees payment on the lease if it otherwise can’t be made. But this is an entirely additional process, from finding someone who fits the bill to gathering all the paperwork. To make the process a simpler, 6sqft has put together a guide of everything you need to know about using guarantor and some tricks of the trade.

Find out the guarantor basics

City Living, maps, Policy

scaffolding, nyc scaffolding, the story behind scaffolding, the history of scaffolding, nyc construction, new your construction sites, post no bills

Sidewalk sheds, or scaffolding, are so pervasive in New York City they almost become part of a neighborhood’s landscape. While used to protect people from falling debris, scaffolding continues to be an omnipresent eyesore that blocks sunlight and views, attracts crime and slows foot traffic. Now, thanks to a new map by the city’s Department of Buildings, residents can explore more than 7,700 sidewalk sheds, each labeled with a color-coded dot highlighting the reason for its construction, its age, and its size. As the New York Times covered, there are currently 280 miles of sidewalk scaffolding in front of 7,752 buildings in the city (way up from the 190 miles we covered just a little over a year ago), which is enough to encircle Manhattan nearly nine times.

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City Living, Midtown, Policy

Congress agreed to a budget deal Sunday night that allocates money to pay New York City back for funds spent on protecting Trump Tower, reports the New York Daily News. The bipartisan agreement creates a $68 million “protection package,” which will reportedly be split with Florida, where Trump’s Palm Beach Mar-a-Lago mansion serves as his vacation home.

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City Living, Transportation

New York's first citywide ferry, citywide ferry, nyc ferry, hornblower nyc ferry

The much-anticipated NYC Ferry service begins today, lessening the commute to Manhattan for many outer borough residents. The first commuter ferry took off from the new Rockaway route at 5:30 a.m. Monday, picked up more passengers at Sunset Park and then arrived in Lower Manhattan in just about one hour. Newly renovated ferries will also launch today on the East River Route, which services Midtown and Financial District communities. On Sunday, Mayor de Blasio held a christening ceremony and took the first ferry ride from the Rockaways to Wall Street.

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City Living, Technology, Transportation

Self-Driving car, Uber, autonomous vehicle

Image of Uber’s self-driving vehicle via Nathan Ingraham for Engadget

While Uber plans to roll out flying taxis in NYC within five years, the ride-hailing company, in addition to many similar companies, hopes to make driverless cars next on their list of proposals. As reported by Crain’s, shared driverless vehicles could account for a quarter of all miles driven in the U.S. by 2030. Since the cars would be shared, driverless and electric, the low-cost would allow many people to give up their personal cars, especially in densely populated cities. New Yorkers own fewer vehicles than residents in any other U.S. city, making it the biggest market for ride-hail services as well as the perfect guinea pig for companies to test driverless vehicles.

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City Living, Technology

The sky is the limit for the popular ride-hailing app, Uber. The company announced Tuesday that it intends to roll out a network of flying cars, or VTOLs (aircraft capable of vertical takeoff and landing) beginning in Dallas-Fort Worth and Dubai by 2020. And as reported by the NY Post, one of Uber’s partners, Blade helicopter service, aims to make New York City a target for its plan within five years. If so, these vehicles, which travel at 200 mph, could take passengers from Manhattan to JFK Airport in as little as five minutes.

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City Living, Transportation, Urban Design

east river greenway

Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Tuesday that the city would develop the gap in the Manhattan waterfront greenway that runs between 41st and 61st Streets along the East River. The city has pledged to spend $100 million on closing the largest unfinished space in the 32-mile loop, including a new esplanade, with an additional $5 million to be spent on filling smaller gaps in East Harlem and Inwood. “The Hudson River Greenway has vastly improved quality of life on the West Side, and we want families in every corner in the borough to have that same access to bike, walk and play along the water,” said the mayor in a statement. “This is the first of many big investments we’ll make as we bring the full Greenway to reality.”

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Featured Story

apartment living 101, City Living, Features

6sqft’s ongoing series Apartment Living 101 is aimed at helping New Yorkers navigate the challenges of creating a happy home in the big city. This week, we’ve put together a list of tips for hiring movers and making sure the big day runs smoothly.

With universities about to let out and warmer weather leading us out of hibernation, moving season in NYC is upon us. And if you’re not one of the brave souls who plans to enlist family and friends to help with the dreaded schlep, you don’t want to blindly hire the first man with a van you come across. From big corporations to small family-run operations, movers in NYC run the gamut in terms of services, pricing, and proximity, but regardless of which route you take, there are several things to consider before deciding. Ahead, 6sqft has rounded up 12 tips for hiring movers, including performing background checks, making sure you’ve accurately counted your boxes (no one wants to be that person), and negotiating the estimate.

All the tips ahead

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