City Living

City Living, History

rainfall nyc, new york city history

A rainy NYC day, photo courtesy of dalioPhoto on Flickr

While it appears New York City avoided much of Hurricane Jose’s wrath this week, experiencing only slight showers and mild winds, New Yorkers weren’t as lucky on an autumn day in 1882. According to the National Weather Service, Sept. 23, 1882 is considered the rainiest day in New York City’s history, with 8.28 inches of rainfall recorded (h/t NY Times). As a Times article reported from the record-setting wet event: “Umbrellas were useless, and most of the thin rubber over-garments proved of little service in excluding the drenching, penetrating streams which hit the wayfarer from above and below, and, for that matter, in front and behind as well.”

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Art, City Living, Events, Top Stories

bartlow-pell mansion museum, the bronx, museum day

The Bartlow-Pell Mansion Museum in the Bronx, photo courtesy of Richard Warren via NYC & Company

It’s that time of the year again! Smithsonian Magazine is hosting its annual “Museum Day Live!” event which provides free admission to over one thousand museums, art galleries and historic homes across the country on one day only: Saturday, Sept. 23. In New York City alone, 25 institutions and educational spaces are open to the public at no charge.

More details here

City Living

Image via Rockaloo/App Store

We don’t all remember mom’s wise advice to “go before you leave the house” as often as we should. And once we’re out there, the prospects for finding a restroom in the city when we need one can be, at best, a crapshoot. Which is where a new app called Rockaloo comes in. According to Time Out, for a small fee, it allows users to buy a pass to restrooms at private businesses across New York City, giving them the opportunity to reserve a time slot to do their private business without having to wait in line. (Are we taking the sharing economy just a little too far?)

Let’s take a loo…k

Featured Story

City Living, Features, Interiors, More Top Stories, real estate trends

In New York City, how much space is too little?

By Cait Etherington, Mon, September 18, 2017

Anthony Triolo apartment, NYC tiny apartment, Upper West Side tiny apartment, 150-square-foot apartment

Image © James Karla Murray / 6sqft

Walking through Union Square in late August, it was difficult to miss the new advertising campaign for Breather. Breather is just the latest space-by-the-hour option for New Yorkers who are in desperate need of space, even if it is simply a small room barely large enough to accommodate two chairs and a table. Of course, Breather isn’t the only company now selling space-by-the-hour to city residents. The market for shared workspaces also continues to grow, providing a growing army of local freelancers with access to desks and even soundproof telephone booths where it is possible to talk to clients without explaining a barking dog or screaming baby in the background.

That so many New Yorkers are willing to pay anywhere from $40 to $100 per hour for a small room where it is possible to have a thought or make a phone call without distraction may appear to offer profound evidence of the city’s space crisis. But are New Yorkers really lacking space, or is our sense of space simply unrealistic? Are we just too precious about the space needed to live and work?

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City Living, Getting Away, Policy, Top Stories

Pochuck Creek, tri-state trails, RPA

Pochuck Creek, photo via Pixabay

The NY-NJ-CT region features hundreds of parks and landscapes, from the Catskills and Pinelands to the beaches of Jersey and Long Island. Despite all of this open space, these recreational spots are disjointed from each other and from the communities that would use them. To better connect the parks to one another and to residents, the Regional Plan Association (RPA) has released a new proposal that calls for a Tri-State Trail network, linking 1,650 miles of biking, hiking, and walking trails in the greater New York region. The trail network would put over 8 million of the area’s residents within a half-mile of a trail, increasing access by 25 percent. It would put over 80 percent of today’s residents, or roughly 18.6 million, within just two miles of a trail.

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City Living

Image via Bodega

The loss of small businesses throughout cities nationwide is already an escalating issue to rising rents and online delivery platforms, but more and more new physical business models are also looking to edge out mom-and-pops and brick-and-mortar retail establishments in general. Take for example a new startup called Bodega, which, you guessed it, wants to replace your actual bodega (they’ve even made their logo a “bodega cat”). Started by two former Google employees, the concept puts unmanned pantries in offices, gyms, dorms, or apartment buildings and stocks them with convenience store staples like non-perishable snacks and beverages, toiletries, cleaning supplies, and even fitness equipment, using a special computer vision system to track purchases (h/t Fast Company).

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City Living, Upper West Side 

rats

With a new school year underway, Upper West Siders now have another chance to sign up for one of the city’s many rigorous academic opportunities. Councilmember Helen Rosenthal and Community Board 7 will be hosting a “Rat Academy” on September 28 to instruct and inspire building owners, supers, management companies and businesses on how to keep the neighborhood rodent-free, according to Time Out. The Department of Health will be on hand to outline safe and effective methods of curbing the subject of a recent West Side Rag rant that lamented “being overrun by rats in and around the entrance on 83rd Street and Riverside Drive.”

No rat left behind, find out more

Featured Story

City Living, Features, History

The boarding house’s long history of hosting single New Yorkers

By Cait Etherington, Tue, September 12, 2017

boarding houses

Images by Esther Bubley, 1943. Courtesy of the Esther Bubley Photo Archive

In the mid-19th century, as the city rapidly grew in area and population, many single New Yorkers faced difficult decisions on the housing market. Unlike the majority of today’s single New Yorkers, however, the decision was not whether to share an apartment with one or more roommates or squeeze into a studio apartment but rather which type of boarding house to inhabit. Ahead we’ll go over the history of the New York City boarding house, as well as where you can still find the handful that remains.

read more here

City Living, Design

Photo via Kev Harb on Flickr

After announcing the official end of the “summer of hell” last week, Amtrak said the next thing on their to-do list is to finally fix the disgusting and dilapidated bathrooms at Penn Station. Both men’s and women’s bathrooms at the busiest transit center in the country will be refurbished beginning this fall, as the New York Times reported.

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City Living, Features, More Top Stories, NYC Guides

100 free things to do in New York City

By Devin Gannon, Wed, September 6, 2017

100 Free Things,free things nyc

Despite being one of the most expensive cities to live in, New York City offers many free activities, events and attractions all year round, letting you pinch pennies when the rent check is due. From free lectures at the Met to free group meditation classes, there are tons of activities that don’t cost a dime. To help New York visitors and natives alike, we’ve put together a guide of the 100 best wallet-friendly things to do in the Big Apple.

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