Search Result for brooklyn history

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25 ideas for your New York City bucket list

By Aaron Ginsburg, Wed, May 25, 2022

New York City is one of the most visited cities in the world, and for good reason. There is no shortage of attention-worthy landmarks, buildings, and activities to spend time exploring. Ahead, find 25 fun ideas deserving a spot on your NYC bucket list, from secret waterfalls and iconic roller coasters to sky-high observation decks and covert speakeasies. This list is by no means comprehensive but should be a good starting point.

See the full list here

Photo by Clay Banks on Unsplash

Public libraries in New York City are calling on New Yorkers to take a stand against book banning. The New York Public Library, Brooklyn Public Library, and Queens Public Library on Monday launched the citywide “Banned Books Challenge,” urging New Yorkers to read 10 books that explore issues of race, sexuality, religion, and history, subjects that have been targeted for censorship in recent months. To kick off the challenge, the libraries made Last Night at the Telegraph Club by Malinda Lo, available for free with no waits on e-reader apps until June 26.

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Next week is Fleet Week, and soon New York will be awash in sailors. If you’re moved by all the festivities and want to get in on the maritime merriment, there are sites exploring New York’s links to the sea throughout all five boroughs. From barges to schooners to yachts to dry docks, here are 10 sites where you can celebrate New York’s seafaring spirit.

Check them all out

Photo courtesy of The Corcoran Group

Located within the Lefferts Manor Historic District in Brooklyn’s Prospect-Lefferts Gardens neighborhood, 67 Midwood Street is a well-preserved 1910 Romanesque Revival home that comes with plenty of options. Asking $3,399,000, this six-bedroom residence just a block from Prospect Park has retained architectural details like arched windows with leaded glass transoms. An interior designer thoroughly renovated the historic townhouse; in addition to looking good, the home offers a garden-level one-bedroom apartment with a basement playroom for extra income or expanded living quarters.

Take the townhouse tour

Photos courtesy of The Corcoran Group

Amid the grand Victorian brownstones and elegant front gardens leading up to Prospect Park, the 1909 brick facade of this unique townhouse at 612 Third Street fits right in. But there’s much more to this $8,995,000 Park Slope townhouse. Its rear facade and interior architecture reflect an authentic Mid-Century Modern design history from a later era, with both aesthetics mixing beautifully throughout the 4,000-square-foot home. With decks, terraces, and patio spaces offering the promise of outdoor living, the five-story residence is a wonder from all angles and in all seasons, from its finished basement playroom to a glass-wrapped fifth-floor penthouse study.

See more of this unusual modern-historic townhouse

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Photo via Flickr cc 

What do Woody Guthrie, Isaac Bashevis Singer, and Frank Schubert (the nation’s last civilian lighthouse keeper) have in common? They all lived in Sea Gate, a private community at the westernmost tip of Coney Island. Sea Gate began as a 19th-century playground for the rich, turned into a hotbed of Yiddish literature and Socialist labor activism in the 1930s, and sported at least one commune in the early ‘70s. Today, Sea Gate is home to about 8,000 residents who enjoy private beaches and expansive views of the Verrazano Bridge. If you want to “get in the Gate,” as the locals say, but aren’t ready to relocate west of the Wonder Wheel, you can snag a summer membership at the Brooklyn Beach Club, where even non-residents can while away the hours under a cabana. Or, you can read on for the history of a Coney Island beach town you’ve probably never visited.

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Photo by Rhododendrites on Wikimedia

Brooklyn’s Green-Wood Cemetery announced on Thursday the opening of a new art installation created by the 184-year-old institution’s first-ever artist in residence. Located within the property’s catacombs, a portion of the cemetery that is usually off-limits to the public, Heidi Lau’s Gardens as Cosmic Terrains consists of sculptures that hang from skylights. The installation opens to the public on Saturday, May 7, and will be on view through July 3.

Details this way

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The history of New York City’s original rooftop bars

By Lucie Levine, Wed, April 20, 2022

Casino Roof Garden, 1899 via NYPL Digital Collections

How many summer evenings have you spent at a rooftop bar? While the rooftop bar was indeed born and bred in New York City, it’s nothing new. Even before New York was a city of skyscrapers, denizens of Gotham liked to take their experiences to vertical extremes. And when it comes to partying, New Yorkers have been conquering new heights, drink in hand, since 1883. That year, impresario Rudolf Aronson debuted a roof garden on the top of his newly built Casino Theater on 39th Street and Broadway. The rooftop garden was soon a Gilded Age phenomenon, mixing vaudeville and vice, pleasure and performance, for well-heeled Bon-Vivants who liked to spend their summers high above the sweltering streets.

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Photo courtesy of Greenpoint Terminal Market

Situated in Brooklyn’s northernmost corner, bridging the popular enclaves of Williamsburg and Long Island City, Greenpoint is an eclectic star in the North Brooklyn neighborhood constellation. A somewhat sleepy industrial neighborhood for much of the 20th century, Greenpoint was settled by Polish immigrants who came here to work along the waterfront nearly a century ago. In the 21st century, having been made irreversibly famous by the hit TV series Girls, it has become one of the most desirable residential areas in Brooklyn.

Your guide to Greenpoint, this way

Photo courtesy of The Corcoran Group

In a prime spot at the intersection of Brooklyn Heights and Dumbo, this out-of-the-ordinary duplex loft at 7 Everit Street is in a 19th-century carriage house. Asking $2,195,000, the co-op loft is on the upper floors of the former horse and carriage storage facility for the Eagle Warehouse next door. The Brooklyn Bridge and East River views from almost every window of the two-bedroom home are as iconic as the building itself, and a sprawling private roof terrace provides a chance to enjoy the view in the open air.

Tour this unusual Brooklyn loft

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