L Train Shutdown

Transportation

Via Oran Viriyincy on Flickr

With the L train shutdown called off last month after years of preparing for its impact on commuters, many New Yorkers were left wondering what would happen to the mitigation efforts planned for both Manhattan and Brooklyn. According to amNY, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority no longer sees the need for a busway on 14th Street, which was intended to limit car traffic during the L train shutdown. While the MTA said it intends to run buses as often as every three minutes on 14th Street when L train service is reduced this spring, critics say buses will move at a sluggish pace.

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Transportation

L TRAIN, NYC SUBWAY, L TRAIN SHUTDOWN

 Image via Flickr

Beginning on Monday, the MTA is planning a series of overnight and weekend interruptions of L train service that will give commuters a glimpse at what’s to come when Governor Cuomo’s new one-track plan to fix the Sandy-damaged Canarsie Tunnel kicks in at the end of April. From January 28 and through March 18, L trains will not run between Broadway Junction and 8 Avenue weeknights from 10:45 p.m. to 5 a.m. In addition to the weeknight closures, there will be no L-train service on seven weekends in February and March: Feb. 1-4, Feb. 8–11, Feb. 15–19, Feb. 22–25, March 1–4, March 8–11, and March 15–18.

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CityRealty, Transportation

What the L beer, L train shutdown beer, Blue Point beer, Winston Tseng

Photo courtesy of Blue Point Brewing Company

The L train shutdown may be canceled, but don’t let Cuomo’s Superman tactics trick you into thinking you’ll get off unscathed. Even without a full 15-month shutdown, there will be a slew of headaches and, like beer company Blue Point Brewing Company says, “who knows what will happen next?!” And when in doubt, an adult beverage can help soften the blow, which is why Blue Point developed its new “What the L?” brew, complete with a very Williamsburg-esque label created by local graphic designer and subway artist Winston Tseng.

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Policy, Transportation

andrew cuomo, l train, MTA

Image via Governor Cuomo’s Flickr

With Governor Cuomo’s plan to avoid a total L train shutdown for 15 months in favor of a “nights and weekends” approach confirmed earlier this month, questions still remain about just what the alternate plan will entail and how riders will be affected. According to an exclusive MTA memo draft obtained by Streetsblog and the New York Post this week, it looks like the new Canarsie Tunnel repair plan will bring its own set of headaches for straphangers, including 20-minute waits between trains on weekends and an exit-only system at First and Third Avenues on weekends.

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Policy, Transportation

L train shutdown is really cancelled this time, MTA says

By Devin Gannon, Fri, January 18, 2019

L train, nyc subway, mta

Via Wikimedia

“The total shutdown of both tunnels and all service scheduled for April 27 will not be necessary,” reads a statement from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority released Thursday. The announcement comes just a few days after the MTA held an “emergency” meeting to present the agency’s board with information about the new L train plan ahead of a vote on the project. But it appears the MTA will argue that the new plan, which would not require a total shutdown of subway service, does not need board approval to move forward after all.

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Policy, Transportation

L TRAIN, NYC SUBWAY, L TRAIN SHUTDOWN

Via Flickr

Earlier this month, Gov. Andrew Cuomo shocked New Yorkers when he called off the 15-month shutdown of L-train service, part of the plan to fix the Canarsie Tunnel which had been in the works for years. Instead, the governor, along with an expert panel of engineers, presented a new, never-been-done-before plan that would require less construction in the century-old tunnel. But the New York Times reported on Tuesday that a similar plan was rejected by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority nearly five years ago over safety and feasibility concerns.

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Transportation

andrew cuomo, l train, MTA

Via Gov. Cuomo’s Flickr

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority on Tuesday will hold an emergency public meeting for its board to review Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s L train reconstruction proposal. Earlier this month, the governor unexpectedly presented a new plan to fix the Carnasie Tunnel that would not require it to close for 15 months and halt L train service between Manhattan and Brooklyn, but instead be repaired on nights and weekends. The MTA board is expected to question the agency on the feasibility of the new plan, which was announced by Cuomo just three months before the shutdown was set to begin in April.

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Policy, Transportation

L train, nyc subway, mta

Via Wikipedia

The dreaded 15-month L train shutdown, planned and studied for three years, is canceled. Or is it? Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Thursday presented a proposal for a new L train plan that would no longer require a 15-month closure of the Carnasie Tunnel, the link between Manhattan and Brooklyn and which was damaged by saltwater floods during Hurricane Sandy. During the news conference, Cuomo, along with a panel of experts, engineers, and the acting chair of the MTA, Fernando Ferrer, touted the project as being the shortest and best way to fix the tunnel. But in a conference call with reporters on Friday, the governor called on the MTA board to hold an emergency meeting to vote yay or nay on his new plan, of which most had heard about on the same day it was announced.

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Policy, Transportation

andrew cuomo, l train, MTA

Knight in shining armor or kink in the chain? In an unexpected, last-minute announcement on Thursday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that he is halting the 15-month L train shutdown in April, calling for a new tunnel design instead that would coincide with night and weekend work for 15 to 20 months. The news comes just a few weeks after the governor toured the Hurricane Sandy-damaged Canarsie Tunnel with engineering experts from Cornell and Columbia Universities. Though he said at the time he was “confident it cannot be done any other way and it cannot be done faster than the MTA is doing it,” Cuomo today threw a curveball saying he and the MTA have agreed on a new design that has never before been used in the U.S. and will mean that it “will not be necessary to close the L Train tunnel at all.”

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City Living, Transportation

Image courtesy of Hunter Fine

In reality, the L train shutdown will be no fun for anyone, but in this satirical board game, the doomsday situation gets a playful twist. Bushwick Daily first spotted the Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for the game, which is called “Escape From Hell.” After selecting a hipster character, players roll the dice and follow the path as they try to get from East New York to Manhattan by bus, ferry, bike, or alternate train service.

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