Hudson Yards

Art, Major Developments, Midtown West, Urban Design

vessel-thomas-heatherwick

Back in September, Related Companies chairman Stephen Ross finally unveiled the large-scale artwork that would anchor the central public space within Hudson Yards. As Ross revealed, Thomas Heatherwick was chosen to design the piece, and it would cost an incredible $150 million to build. Dubbed “The Vessel,” the climbable sculpture would rise 16-stories—150 feet tall, 50 feet wide at its base and 150 feet wide at the top—and consist of a web of 154 concrete and steel staircases with 2,500 steps, 80 landings and an elevator; the piece, in fact, so massive that it could comfortably accommodate 1,000 visitors at a time. The sculpture was to be constructed in Monfalcone, Italy before being shipped to its home on the Hudson River. And now CityRealty reports that parts of what Ross once called “New York’s Eiffel Tower” have officially arrived at the site and await assembly.

More photos this way

Architecture, Midtown West, New Developments, Starchitecture

50-hudson-yards-norman-foster

When completed, Related Companies‘ and Oxford Properties Group’s 50 Hudson Yards will be the city’s most expensive office building, coming in at $3.94 billion. To make starchitect Norman Foster‘s pricey vision a reality, the developers had filed an application with the New York City Industrial Development Agency to take advantage of financial incentives that were enacted in 2006 to encourage development in Hudson Yards. And according to a new report in Crain’s, the agency has approved $195 million in such tax breaks, which include making fixed payments towards the 985-foot tower’s development costs instead of paying property taxes that vary from year to year, as well as receiving a discount on the mortgage recording taxes.

Find out more right here

Architecture, Midtown West, New Developments, Starchitecture

50-hudson-yards-norman-foster

It’s been less than a month since it was revealed that starchitect Norman Foster would be designing the Related Companies‘ and Oxford Properties Group’s 50 Hudson Yards commercial tower, but the developers have already pegged the cost of the project at $3.94 billion, which will make it the city’s most expensive office building, reports The Real Deal. The 985-foot tower, where BlackRock has already signed a 20-year lease for 15 floors, will surpass One Vanderbilt‘s projected $3.14 billion price tag and Bjarke Ingels’ planned $3 billion+ High Line tower known as The Spiral, as well as One World Trade Center‘s current record of $3.8 billion.

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Architecture, Major Developments, Midtown West, New Developments, Starchitecture

50-hudson-yards-norman-foster

It’s been 14 months since developer Related Companies bought the site of a former McDonald’s at 34th Street and 10th Avenue, the final parcel needed to complete Hudson Yards. Initial reports said the site of 50 Hudson Yards would hold a 62-story, 1,000+ foot commercial tower, but Related and Oxford Properties Group have now revealed that the structure will rise 58 stories and 985 feet and be designed by starchitect Norman Foster. As first reported by Curbed, the news comes on the heels of BlackRock’s decision to sign a 20-year lease for 15 floors, or 850,000 square feet, in the building, leaving their long-time Park Avenue home in a show of confidence in the mega-complex.

Get more details ahead

real estate trends

15 Hudson Yards, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Hudson Yards construction

An estimate by the New York Building Congress has construction spending in 2016 at more than $43.1 billion, beating the $41.6 billion high of 2007 and reflecting a 26 percent increase from last year’s $34.4 billion, the Wall Street Journal reports. The surge in construction, led by mega-project Hudson Yards on Manhattan’s West Side and public projects like the Second Avenue Subway, has led to rising construction costs and an attendant surge in the demand for skilled labor, bringing workers to the city from all over the U.S.

Find out more about what’s driving the new boom

Cool Listings, Midtown West, New Developments, Rentals

555ten-model-unit-2

Model unit designed by Lillian August

After launching its affordable housing lottery for 120 below-market rate units back in May, 555Ten has revealed pricing for its 478 market-rate rentals, ranging from $3,150/month studios to $6,250/month two-bedrooms. Designed by SLCE Architects and developed by Extell, the 610-foot, 53-story glassy skyscraper will offer an over-the-top amenity package (including a dog run, two salt water pools, and a bowling alley) and custom-designed interiors from McGinley Design. The model units are open for business, and we’re told that the amenity spaces will start to reveal themselves later this week in anticipation of November occupancies.

Find out more here and get a first look at the model units

condos, Cool Listings, Midtown West, New Developments

15 Hudson Yards, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Hudson Yards construction

In anticipation of its sales launch, 15 Hudson Yards released a slew of new renderings last month, showcasing “new views of the bundled quad of cylinders that make up its body, as well as its rectilinear base that will abut the Shed,” as 6sqft reported. And now without further ado, listings for the 285 market-rate condos (there will also be 106 affordable rentals) have officially come online, ranging from a $3.7 million two-bedroom on the 25th floor to a $13.8 million penthouse on the 84th floor, according to Curbed.

Find out more and see renderings and floorplans

Midtown West, New Developments, Starchitecture

The Spiral by Bjarke Ingels

Developer Tishman Speyer has officially filed plans with the Department of Buildings for Bjarke Ingels‘ Hudson Yards tower The Spiral at 509 West 34th Street. As reported by The Real Deal, the filing confirms that the office tower will rise 65 stories and 1,005 feet and encompass 2.2 million square feet. When renderings were first released of the $3.2 billion project, which is distinguished by cascading landscaped terraces and hanging gardens, Ingels said his design “combines the classic ziggurat silhouette of the premodern skyscraper with the slender proportions and efficient layouts of the modern high-rise.”

More details ahead

Art, Major Developments, Midtown West, Urban Design

Vessel by Thomas Heatherwick, Hudson Yards public art, Heatherwick Studios, NYC public art

It was nearly three years ago that Related Companies chairman Stephen Ross boasted that Hudson Yards‘ public art piece would be “New York’s Eiffel Tower,” and after an unveiling today of the massive sculpture that will anchor the central public space, it seems he might not have been too far off.

More details and renderings this way

Architecture, condos, Major Developments, New Developments, Rentals

15 Hudson Yards, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Hudson Yards construction

15 Hudson Yards, the first of two residential towers that Related Companies and Oxford Properties have planned for the massive complex, started its climb into the far west side skyline back in March, and now, seven months later, it’s readying for a sales launch this week. According to a press release, condos will start at about $2 million for one-bedrooms and go up to $30 million for the penthouses.

To coincide with the 285 market-rate condos hitting the market (there will also be 106 affordable rentals, for which details have yet to be released), YIMBY has gotten its hands on new renderings of the 910-foot building, which, as 6sqft previously described, has been dubbed the “Morph Tower” for its “curvaceous and feminine design” from Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Rockwell Group. The images provide new views of the bundled quad of cylinders that make up its body, as well as its rectilinear base that will abut the Shed.

More renderings and details ahead

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Midtown West

manhattan west, hudson yards, som, renderings, brookfield properties, new developments, skyscrapers, tall towers, megaproject, midtown west

6sqft revealed renderings at the beginning of the year of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill‘s Hudson Yards-adjacent, five million-square-foot Manhattan West project, which “will include two office towers, a rental tower with 844 apartments at 435 West 31st Street, retail space and a new landscaped public plaza designed by James Corner Field Operations, the firm responsible for the design of the High Line.” As of Tuesday, September 6th, New Yorkers earning 60 percent of the area median income can apply for 169 affordable apartments in the residential tower; they’ll range from $913/month studios to $1,359/month three-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify here

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Midtown West

The Hi-Side, 509 West 38th Street, BKSK Architects, Midtown West rentals

Just this week, BKSK Architects’ dapper new mixed-use tower in the Hudson Yards district topped off at 345 feet. Located at 509 West 38th Street and dubbed the Hi-Side, the 30-story building is just four blocks from the new 7 train stop and adjacent to the forthcoming Hudson Park Boulevard. When it opens its doors next year, it will offer 225 rentals, 46 of which will be reserved for New Yorkers earning 60 percent of the area media income. As of tomorrow, the latter batch of residences will be up for grabs through the city’s affordable housing lottery, with units ranging from $913/month studios to $1,183/month two-bedrooms.

Find out more right here

Architecture, Construction Update, Major Developments, Midtown West, New Developments, Urban Design

Hudson Yards, Midtown West, Visualhouse, Far West Side (7)

The opening of the first Hudson Yards tower dominated headlines Tuesday, but with this milestone also came a resurgence of criticism. As Crain’s reports, the Independent Budget Office has released a new study (pdf) highlighting that, to date, the city has spent nearly $359 million paying interest on $3 billion in bonds that were taken out to pay for infrastructure around Hudson Yards, including the expansion of the 7 train. The city had originally anticipated spending between just $7.4 and $205 million from start through 2016.

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Major Developments, Midtown West

10HudsonYards

10 Hudson Yards, the first building in what is one of the country’s largest construction sites, is officially open for business on Manhattan’s far west side. Fashion brand Coach is in the process of moving its headquarters to the 900-foot, 52-story mixed-use structure–known as Coach Tower–from its former location a few blocks away, the Wall Street Journal reports. For the luxury brand, the move represents an important milestone in a quest to re-establish its upscale image. The deal to move into a 738,000-square-foot office in the Kohn Pederson Fox-designed building made headlines when it was announced in 2013.

Coach invested $750 million to buy the retail condo space for its new headquarters. Coach’s design team worked with STUDIOS Architecture on their new workspace and dedicated entry lobby, which will feature a replica of the company’s famed product library: On display will be 2,000 handbags from past times to present, viewable by High Line visitors.

Find out what else is in store for 10 Hudson Yards

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Midtown West, New Developments, Rentals

555 Tenth Avneue, Extell Development, 547 Tenth, SLCE Architects, 551 Tenth, McGinley Design 2 (3)

Last September, 6sqft reported the topping out of Extell Development‘s 610-foot-tall, mixed-use tower quietly rising at 555 Tenth Avenue and 41st Street. Now fully sheathed in glass, the development team kicked off its housing lottery for the building’s 120 below-market rate units, priced from $910 per month for studios up to to $1,315 for three-bedrooms.

Designed by SLCE Architects, the 53-story, 725,000-square-foot structure rises one block west of the Port Authority Bus Terminal and two avenues west of the 42nd Street A/C/E train station with its connection to Times Square. The building is within the emerging Hudson Yards area, which over the next decade will usher in thousands of residential units and millions of square feet of new office space. Across from the tower, an additional 7-train subway station may be constructed to meet the increasing number of residents in the area.

Find out if you qualify here

Architecture, condos, Major Developments, Midtown West, New Developments, Rentals

15 Hudson Yards, 35 Hudson Yards, Hudson Yards, Related Companies

On the heels of the news that Hudson Yards will add $18.9 billion to the city’s GDP and the reconfirmation that the developers will build an iconic $200 million sculpture at the center of the plan’s plaza, Related quietly launched a new Hudson Yards Living website, providing general information for prospective residents and a few new images of the $20 billion master plan.

More details and renderings this way

Major Developments, Midtown West

Hudson Yards, Midtown West, Visualhouse, Far West Side (1)

According to a recent study, economic activity at the $20 billion Hudson Yards West Side development–the nation’s largest construction site–will contribute $18.9 billion to the city–more than the gross domestic product of Iceland ($15.3 billion), Crains reports. The study, commissioned by the project’s developer, Related Cos., predicts that the companies projected to occupy the massive project that will stretch between West 30th Street and West 34th Street along the Hudson River will generate economic activty in the form of, among other things, salaries for new jobs and money paid to the MTA by the developer both during the 14-year construction period and once the development is complete in 2025.

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Architecture, Midtown West, Urban Design

Hub on the Hudson, Eytan Kaufman, Hudson Yards, floating park

New York architect and longtime visionary Eytan Kaufman has drawn up a conceptual plan to connect the final leg of the High Line to a new island/pier in the Hudson River. Currently, the High Line gets tantalizingly close to the waterfront in its final spur around Hudson Yards, but then swerves inland towards an anticlimactic end at the Jacob Javits Center. Kaufman’s scheme called Hub on the Hudson would build a pedestrian bridge over the West Side Highway, shuttling people from the elevated park to a sprawling, circular-shaped cultural and recreational center. It’s quite similar to Barry Diller’s proposed Pier 55 floating park, which is planned for a Hudson River site slightly farther south in the Meatpacking District.

Extending more than 700 feet into the river, and spanning nearly nine acres in size, the pie-in-the-Hudson plan would build five interconnected pyramid-shaped buildings, comprised of an art center, restaurants, and publicly accessible open spaces. A circular elevated promenade would encircle the island, which Kaufman says would contrast to the linear procession of the High Line. At ground level there will be a central reflecting pool with a promenade leading out to a marina. The pentagonal, pyramidal and circular themes expressed in the plan make its spiritual intentions quite clear: To sail the High Line’s tourists back home.

Check out all the renderings this way

Architecture, condos, Major Developments, Midtown West, New Developments, Rentals, Starchitecture

15-Hudson-Yards-Hudson-Yards-Tower-D-DSR-Relate-Oxford-

The foundation mat has been poured, and Hudson Yards‘ first residential building, Tower D at 15 Hudson Yards, is beginning its climb into the burgeoning far west side skyline. Situated alongside the High Line, at the northeast corner of West 30th Street and Eleventh Avenue, 15 Hudson Yards will house nearly 400 apartments and soar more than 900 feet high upon completion. Discounting the enormous spire on the New York Times Building, the tower will be for a short while the tallest building in Manhattan west of Eighth Avenue. It will also abut the Culture Shed, likely to be the city’s next great cultural venue.

The skyscraper will be the first of two residential towers that Related Companies and the Oxford Properties have planned for eastern rail yards. The second will be the 1,000-foot-tall 35 Hudson Yards, and they will join the 900-foot Coach Tower at 10 Hudson Yards and the 1,296-foot 30 Hudson Yards.

More details and renderings ahead

Midtown West, Policy, Transportation

7 train extension, NYC MTA, NYC subway construction, Hudson Yards subway station

The Post reported last week that the Hudson Yards 7-train subway station, which opened just this past September after more than ten years of planning and delays, was a “disgusting, moldy mess,” noting that “leaks, flooded bathrooms and water damage” had put nearly half the escalators out of service. According to a plumber, it’s due to poor construction, with the ceilings not being made waterproof. If this wasn’t disturbing enough, especially considering the station’s $2.45 billion price tag, the Times has new information straight from the MTA: “A spokesman for the authority, Kevin Ortiz, said the contractor, Yonkers Contracting, would pay $3 million to fix the leaks. The work began last Friday and will take up to three months, Mr. Ortiz said.”

Get a look at the damage

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