Herzog & de Meuron

Art, Gowanus, New Developments, Starchitecture

Rendering of Powerhouse Workshop via Herzog & de Meuron

Despite its Superfund status, the Gowanus Canal has ushered in a Whole Foods, an artisanal ice cream factory, and more than one high-end residential development, but one vestige of its gritty, industrial days has remained–the so-called Batcave. Build in 1904 as the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company’s Central Power Station, the warehouse was taken out of service in the ’50s, becoming in the 2000s a home for squatters, venue for impromptu dance parties, and unofficial street art display. But it looks like the former warehouse will now join the ranks of its Brooklyn-esque neighbors, as the Times reports that Pritzker Prize-winning Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron will transform the space into an art production factory and exhibition space to be called the Powerhouse Workshop, though it will preserve the iconic graffiti

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Featured Story

building of the year, Features, New Developments

VOTE for 6sqft’s 2016 Building of the Year!

By 6sqft, Sat, December 10, 2016

For new developments, 2015 was the year of reveals, but 2016 was all about watching these buildings reshape our city. Ahead we’ve narrowed a list of 12 news-making residential structures, each noted for their distinctive design, blockbuster prices, or their game-changing potential on the skyline or NYC neighborhoods.

Which of these you think deserves 6sqft’s title of 2016 Building of the Year? Have your say below. Polls for our third annual competition will be open up until 11:59 p.m., Sunday, December 11th*, and we will announce the winner on Tuesday, December 13th!

Learn more about each of the buildings in the running here

Celebrities, Landmarks Preservation Commission, New Developments, Upper East Side

11-15 East 75th Street, Roman Abramovich, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Upper East Side mansion, Steven Wang architect

Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich started assembling his $78 million trio of Upper East Side townhouses at 11-15 East 75th Street back in January of 2015, but it wasn’t until this past March that he first released his proposal to combine the townhouses into a giant mansion. The Department of Buildings rejected his initial, $6 million proposal, which called for “an 18,255-square-foot mansion with a six-foot front yard, 30-foot backyard, and pool in the cellar,” as 6sqft previously reported. But since the homes are located within the Upper East Side Historic District, it’s the Landmarks Preservation Commission who has the final say.

The LPC also rejected Abramovich‘s first proposal in April, but today they reviewed and approved a revised plan from his architect Steven Wang, along with big-name firm Herzog & de Meuron as design consultant. It calls for a modified restoration of the current facades and the removal of the rear yard building elements to be replaced with a garden and new glass facade that unites the three homes.

More details this way

Architecture, condos, Lower East Side, New Developments, Starchitecture

Herzog & de Meuron’s 215 Chrystie Street Reaches Full Height; Only Three Units Remain

By Ondel Hylton and Heather Cooper Vivares, Wed, April 6, 2016

215 Chrystie Street, Hezog & de Meuron, Ian Schrager, NYC Hotels, Condos 2 (1)

Last November, 6sqft reported that Ian Schrager and the Witkoff Group’s upcoming hotel/condominium building 215 Chrystie Street had just made its way past the midway point. Now, the “tough-luxe” Bowery development has reached its full apex, 314 feet to the mechanical bulkhead, dominating the low-slung skyline of the Lower East Side.

The mixed-use development will have a 356-room PUBLIC Hotel from Ian Schrager along its lower levels, topped by 11 limited condominium residences. Pritzker Prize-winning firm Herzog & de Meuron, with Beyer Blinder Belle as architects of record, designed the arthropod-esque, concrete-framed building.

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Architecture, condos, Cool Listings, New Developments, West Village 

160 leroy street, herzog and demeuron, 160 leroy street floor plan

When you work in the real estate field, looking at floorplans can get a bit monotonous–rectangular box, square rooms, maybe a patio if you’re lucky. But every once in a while, you’ll see some schematics that cause pause, like these amoeba-shaped floorplans at Herzog & de Meuron’s 160 Leroy (h/t Curbed).

The 15-story, glassy West Village building has 49 condos, ranging from a $2.6 million one-bedroom unit to a $25 million penthouse. Depending where they’re located along the undulating facade, the interior layouts can be long and windy or compact and curving.

See them all

Architecture, condos, Construction Update, Hotels, Lower East Side, New Developments, Starchitecture

The structure of Ian Schrager/Witkoff Group’s 26-story hotel/condominium combo 215 Chrystie Street is now more than half way up, giving us a clearer view of the “tough-luxe” exterior composed of raw concrete and large clear glass panes.

Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning firm Herzog & de Meuron, with Handel Architects as architects of record, the tower’s lower levels feature a highly-textured facade of inwardly-tilting columns framing expansive clear panes of glass. The tilt creates slightly more interior space, and from ground level, increases the amount of reflection in the glass, thus providing more privacy for guests. According to the firm’s webpage on the project, “The structure of the building is pushed to the exterior and follows the grid of the large floor-to-ceiling window bays. This introduces a depth to the façade on the exterior and liberates the interior from freestanding columns.”

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condos, Construction Update, New Developments, Starchitecture, Tribeca

56 Leonard, Herzog de Meuron, Tribeca, skyscrapers, Alexico, Hines, Luxury Condos, NYC Developments

Last January, 6sqft reported on the the progress of Alexico Group /Hines’ project 56 Leonard: The concrete structure was around 700 feet tall with little more than 100 feet to rise. Now, alas, the 821-foot Tribeca tower, playfully known as “the Jenga building” and designed by Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron, has finally topped out! With a delivery date expected sometime next year, all that remains for its wacky floor plate configurations and erratic cantilevered projections is the remainder of its exterior cladding, which we hear will now also progress from the top down, and the interior fit-out of its 145 residences.

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Architecture, Design, Interiors

WORKac, Weiden + Kennedy, ArchDaily, building of the year 2015, boty 2015, interiors winner, archdaily interiors winner

Interiors winner WORKac’s Wieden+Kennedy NY © Bruce Damonte

The votes are in, and the people of the architecture and design community have spoken. ArchDaily has announced the winners of its Building of the Year 2015 contest. The winners of the 14 categories included NYC-based firm WORKac’s Wieden+Kennedy NY headquarters for Interiors (which have been featured on 6sqft before), Herzog & de Meuron’s Arena do Morro for Sports Architecture, and OTO’s Fogo Natural Park Venue for Cultural Architecture. Congratulations!

CHECK OUT ALL THE WINNERS…

Architecture, condos, Construction Update, New Developments, Starchitecture, Tribeca

56 Leonard, Herzog & de Meuron, Tribeca condos, Alexico Group, GHWA, WSP group, NYC skyscrapers, Manhattan skyline, Downtown, New York City construction

Esteemed architect and historian Robert A.M. Stern once said that “New York is a constellation of magic moments. No city as complex as New York rebuilds itself so often, and often so well.” Two stars are being born in that nebula of irregular streets we call Downtown. The taller of the two, 30 Park Place, is designed by the famed starchitect himself, and has recently surpassed its neighbor, the Woolworth Building, to soon take its place as the tallest residential perch in the district. The other star, 56 Leonard, may still shine brighter, however. While absent any height superlatives, 56 Leonard may very well end up being the most interesting skyscraper Downtown has produced in decades.

Nicknamed the “Jenga-building” and the “tower of penthouses,” 56 Leonard’s design comes from the Swiss architectural firm of Herzog & de Meuron while working with the residential know-it-alls at Goldstein Hill & West. Currently, the concrete frame is approximately 700 feet tall with little more than 100 feet to rise before topping off. The floors progressively stagger at varying configurations creating cantilevered interior spaces as well as outdoor balconies for each of the residences.

More details ahead

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, real estate trends, Starchitecture

Glass vs. Stone: An Epic Architecture Battle

By Dana Schulz, Thu, September 18, 2014

glas and stone nyc buildings, stone nyc buildings, glas nyc buildings

Decisions, decisions…sometimes there’s just far too many in New York City. Thai or Chinese takeout? Subway or bus? Central Park or the High Line? The list goes on. And one of the most grueling decisions we make as New Yorkers is where to live. From choosing a borough and neighborhood to deciding on a price point, it’s quite the undertaking. But what about the most elementary component of the building in which we decide to live–it’s material. To be more exact, glass or stone.

Glass tower dwellers are often drawn to the floor-to-ceiling windows, panoramic views, and clean lines, whereas buyers of apartments in stone buildings prefer a more traditional feel, with pre-war-style layouts that provide great separation of spaces. And some of the city’s most prominent architects have become synonymous with one style or the other. Think Richard Meier for glass and Robert A.M. Stern for stone. CityRealty decided to take a closer look at this epic battle and see how pairs of glass and stone developments fared across the city.

See how these buildings battle it out

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