Grand Central Terminal

Midtown East, Policy, Transportation

Photo by Marc A. Hermann / MTA on Flickr

Gov. Kathy Hochul on Tuesday announced that the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s long-awaited 700,000-square-foot East Side Access Project will be renamed “Grand Central Madison.” The project, which brings Long Island Rail Road service to Grand Central Terminal, will increase LIRR service systemwide by 40 percent during morning peak service and significantly increase reverse peak service. Grand Central Madison is expected to open in December.

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Midtown, Restaurants

All images courtesy of Talea Beer Co.

New York City’s first and only female-owned and operated production brewery has opened a pop-up outside of Grand Central Terminal. Located at the corner of Vanderbilt Avenue and 45th Street, Talea Beer Co.’s pop-up brewery is open daily from 4 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. and offers five different beers on tap, as well as canned beers and draft pours to go. Open through September, the brewery also offers cocktails and wine for non-beer drinkers.

Details here

Midtown East, Policy, Transportation

Governor Kathy Hochul rode a test train from Jamaica to the East Side Access complex at Grand Central Terminal on Sun., October 31, 2021. (Marc A. Hermann / MTA) Flickr

The project that will bring direct Long Island Rail Road service to Grand Central Terminal hit a major milestone this weekend. Gov. Kathy Hochul on Sunday rode the first passenger LIRR train into the new concourse at the Midtown East transit hub and gave the public a first look at the terminal. Expected to officially open in December 2022, the East Side Access project will provide direct service to Manhattan’s east side for Long Island and Queens commuters, while also reducing crowds at Penn Station.

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Midtown East, Restaurants

Photo by Jazz Guy on Flickr

The subterranean, century-old oyster bar in Grand Central Terminal will finally reopen next month after nearly a year and a half. The historic Grand Central Oyster Bar announced it will open its doors on September 7 at 100 percent capacity, as Gothamist first reported. After a temporary Covid-related closure last March, the Midtown East restaurant and bar resumed indoor dining that September, only to close again less than two weeks later.

Get the details

Featured Story

Architecture, Art, Features, History, Landscape Architecture, NYC Guides

While visiting the major, most popular attractions of New York City can be fun, it can also be stressful, overwhelming and full of selfie-taking tourists. However, the great thing about the Big Apple is that plenty of other attractions exist that are far less known or even hidden in plain sight. To go beyond the tourist-filled sites and tour the city like you’re seeing it for the very first time, check out 6sqft’s list ahead of the 20 best underground, secret spots in New York City.

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Featured Story

Features, holidays

Winter Village at Bryant Park; Photo by Angela Cranford

Like the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree lighting, and the Times Square ball drop on New Year’s Eve, many of the city’s holiday markets will also be online-only this year because of the coronavirus pandemic. While nothing beats the magic of New York City during the holiday season and the traditions that come along with it, there are still ways to support local artists, businesses, and vendors this year. In addition to a few markets happening in-person this year, including the open-air shops at Bryant Park, a number have gone virtual, allowing you to shop safely from home, no matter where that is.

Full list ahead

Manhattan, Midtown East, Restaurants

Grand Central’s historic Oyster Bar closes again

By Devin Gannon, Mon, October 12, 2020

Photo by Jazz Guy on Flickr

Less than two weeks after reopening for the first time in over six months, Grand Central Oyster Bar has temporarily closed again. The Midtown East restaurant resumed indoor service at its iconic dining room on September 30, the day indoor dining was permitted again in New York City. But with indoor dining capped at 25 percent capacity in the city, the Oyster Bar, which normally relies on commuters and tourists, could not do enough business to stay open.

More here

Featured Story

Features, History, Midtown, Transportation

Grand Central, Track 61, secret track, elevator, FDR

Image © Emily Nonko for 6sqft

The iconic Grand Central Terminal is a building with more than a few secrets. Constructed in 1913 with the wealth of the Vanderbilt family, there was a lavish private office (now known as The Campbell Apartment), glass catwalks, a hidden spiral staircase, and even artists’ studios on an upper floor. One of the most infamous secrets of the terminal, however, was a secret track used specifically for a president to access one of the most famous hotels in the world. Known as Track 61, it leads to a special platform that was never used or intended to be used in regular passenger service—it just happened to be in the right place.

Keep reading about Grand Central’s secret track

City Living, History, Transportation

times square shuttle, times square curved tracks, nyc subway

The Times Square shuttle platform, Photo by Helvetica Fanatic on Wikimedia 

At the platform of the Times Square-Grand Central shuttle, a train track is hidden in plain sight. At both ends of the two-station line, tracks are numbered 1, 3 and 4, with no Track 2 to be found. As the New York Times explained, Track 2 once ran in its appropriate spot, between Tracks 1 and 3, but was taken out of operation nearly 100 years ago. After an attempt to expand the original 1904 line turned to major confusion for commuters, transit officials covered Track 2 with wooden flooring to make it easier for New Yorkers to walk to the new tracks.

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Midtown East, New Developments

one vanderbilt, vanderbilt plaza, sl green

Aerial rendering of Vanderbilt Plaza courtesy of SL Green

A car-free public space will open this summer between Grand Central Terminal and Midtown’s newest, tallest office building, One Vanderbilt. Renderings released this week, which were first spotted by the New York Post, show a new plaza on a strip of Vanderbilt Avenue between East 42nd Street to East 43rd Street, situated at the southern end of the iconic terminal. The open space, dubbed “Vanderbilt Plaza,” is part of SL Green’s commitment to invest $220 million in transit improvements in exchange for zoning changes agreed to by the city in 2014.

See the plaza

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