Goldstein Hill & West

condos, Long Island City, New Developments

44-30 24th Street, Long Island City, Court Square

With another skyscraper proposal approved, Long Island City moves one step closer to looking like a Manhattan copycat. The latest sky-high tower to get its site cleared and zoning approved sits in Court Square at 43-30 24th Street. As covered by CityRealty, the permits show this building, developed by commercial real estate firm Stawski Partners, will hold 921 condos and rise 731 feet, almost 75 feet higher than the borough’s current tallest building at One Court Square. And if it finishes before the Court Square City View Tower next door, set to rise 66 stories and become Queen’s tallest, it will briefly hold that title.

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Bronx, mott haven, New Developments

The massive South Bronx waterfront development planned by Somerset Partners and Chetrit Group is coming together–at least visually. CityRealty revealed a rendering of the second parcel of a two-parcel master plan that will eventually hold six residential towers and park space. Construction on the first three buildings within the first parcel at 2401 Third Avenue was approved last summer. This second parcel at 101 Lincoln Avenue will hold three more towers, 25 stories each, with a grand total of 826 apartments. The developers have long heralded this development as a game-changer for the South Bronx, but faced pushback after Somerset developer Keith Rubenstein attempted to rebrand the area as the “Piano District” and held a party that capitalized on the struggles of the Bronx in the 1970s, featuring burning trash cans and a bullet-ridden car.

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Architecture, condos, Long Island City, New Developments

23-15 44th Drive, Court Square City View Tower, Hill West, Long Island City condos, tallest building in Queens

When plans were originally filed in February 2016, the Long Island City skyscraper since dubbed Court Square City View Tower was set to reach 964 feet. In April, it got bumped up to supertall status at 984 feet, making it Queens’ future tallest building. It’s since been dropped to 66 stories, but according to a new project page from architects Hill West (formerly Goldstein Hill & West), it will still be Long Island City’s tallest tower, and therefore the tallest in the borough. CityRealty first noticed the updated details, which come with the first true renderings of the 800-unit condominium at 23-15 44th Drive. In addition to 360-degree views of Manhattan, the tower will offer an all-glass curtainwall facade, a retail base, and a slew of corner-apartment balconies.

More details ahead

Long Island City, New Developments

Long Island City, Tishman Speyer, 28-10 Jackson Avenue

Residential tower at 28-10 Jackson Avenue (L); Commercial tower at 28-07 Jackson Avenue (R). Via Tishman Speyer

There are currently nearly 30 under-construction and proposed projects in Long Island City, which, as 6sqft recently described “is sprouting a small city worth of skyscrapers, ushering in thousands of new residents, hundreds of hotel rooms, and a few hundred thousand square feet of office space.” Two big-time projects come from Tishman Speyer Properties, who are erecting a trio of slab residential towers that will together usher in 1,900 new apartments. In a Wall Street Journal piece today, we get a first look at this glassy consortium, along with new details about the developer’s adjacent two-towered commercial project that will be home to WeWork, Macy’s, and yet another food hall.

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Bronx, mott haven, New Developments, Rentals

Controversial South Bronx Developer Keith Rubenstein of Somerset Partners, along with the Chetrit Group, received approvals earlier this summer for a two-site, six-tower, mixed-use master plan on the Mott Haven banks of the Harlem River. This is the same project that Rubenstein touted as part of his campaign to rebrand the southern portion of the borough as the “Piano District,” a marketing ploy that nodded to the piano manufacturers that dotted the area 100 years ago, but that featured a misguided party with burning trash cans and a bullet-ridden car, referencing the horrible “Bronx is burning” days of the 1970s.

Contention aside, the development is moving ahead, and CityRealty.com has a 360-degree look at how the first site’s three towers (two at 20 stories and one at 25) will transform the South Bronx skyline. These buildings at 2401 Third Avenue will rise just to the northwest of the Third Avenue Bridge, the former site of an 1880s iron works building that will soon boast $3,500/month apartments.

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Architecture, condos, Construction Update, Flatiron, New Developments

Flatiron condos, NYC towers, Manhattan development

Who would have thought the most alluring residential skyscraper addition to the city’s post-recession boom would not rise in Midtown, near its overly-discussed Billionaires’ Row, or near the city’s historical skyscraper center, the Financial District, but rather smack dab between the two at 45 East 22nd Street in the Flatiron. Overlooking Madison Square Park and its turn-of-the-century engineering marvels–the Flatiron Building and Metropolitan Life Building–the svelte glass spire has fully ascended to its full 65-story, 777-foot peak.

A malnourished baby on the world stage, the building’s height is less than a third of the world’s tallest building and will contain a paltry 83 condominium units priced from $2.5 million for a one-bedroom to $38 million for one of its two penthouses.

More on the building this way

Architecture, Long Island City, New Developments

Court-Square-View

In February, Flushing-based developer Chris Jiashu Xu of United Construction & Development Group filed plans for a 79-story, 964-foot residential tower in Long Island City, giving it the title of would-be tallest tower in Queens. Dubbed Court Square City View Tower, it’s located just north of One Court Square (the borough’s current tallest building at 658 feet), but new information reveals that it will now steal the title by even more of a landslide.

The developer put in a request with the Federal Aviation Administration for a 984-foot-tall tower, sending it into supertall territory. And with its mechanical bulkhead, the structure will rise 1,000 feet.

The rest of the details

affordable housing, Architecture, condos, New Developments, Rentals, Upper West Side 

GHWA, Pelli Clarke Pelli, Silverstein

Propelled skyward by the still-sizzling Upper West Side residential market and its dearth of buildable sites, the final phase of the Riverside South master plan is coming together alas. After decades on the drawing board, this southern-most, eight-acre segment collectively known as Riverside Center/Waterline Center has already spawned a pair of residential buildings designed by SLCE Architects  and another by Pelli Clarke Pelli with Goldstein, Hill & West Architects (GHWA). Three other parcels to the west are now undergoing site preparation. Those lots will give rise to a trio condo and rental buildings whose developer, Boston-based General Investment and Development Companies (GID), has enlisted a trio of high caliber designers working with GHWA, the executive architect of record.

Work has moved forward swiftly on the the plan’s first two towers. The shorter of the pair, known as One West End , has just topped off its 491-foot concrete skeleton and is being developed through a partnership between the Elad Group and Silverstein Properties. The robust 41-story spire is the second tallest building on West End Avenue, only behind its more anonymous 521-foot-tall rental neighbor 21 West End.

Details, renderings, and construction photos this way

Architecture, Long Island City, New Developments

Court Square City View Tower, 23-15 44th Drive, Long Island City development, United Construction & Development Group, tallest building in Queens, NYC tallest towers, Goldstein Hill & West Architects

Back in August, 6sqft revealed renderings of the upcoming Long Island City skyscraper dubbed Queens Plaza Park, which is slated to rise 915 feet. At the time, this made it the tallest building planned outside of Manhattan, but a lot can change in six months. First off, Brooklyn will take the outer borough title, as a 1,066-foot tower is planned for 340 Flatbush Avenue Extension in Downtown Brooklyn. And now, Queens Plaza Park will also lose its Queens-based superlative, as The Real Deal reports that there’s a new tallest building in town.

Flushing-based developer Chris Jiashu Xu of United Construction & Development Group filed plans for a 79-story residential tower in Long Island City that will rise a whopping 964 feet. It’s located just north of One Court Square (the borough’s current title-holder at 658 feet) at 23-15 44th Drive and is titled Court Square City View Tower. The building is designed by Goldstein, Hill & West Architects (the same firm responsible for former tallest frontrunner 42-12 28th Street) and appears to be a fairly standard glassy volume. Its 759,000 square feet of residential space will yield 774 apartments, and there will also be 200,000 square feet of retail on the ground floor.

More details and views ahead

Architecture, Harlem, New Developments, Rentals

1399 Park Avenue, Heritage Real Estate Partners, Terrace on the Park, Goldstein Hill & West

Google Streetview of buildings that previously stood at the site (L); Rendering of the new building via Goldstein Hill & West Architects (R)

Here’s our first look at Heritage Real Estate Partners’ 23-story, 108-unit residential building underway at 1399 Park Avenue in East Harlem. Designed by Goldstein Hill & West Architects (GHWA), the 253-foot tall, glass and cast-stone tower is expressed as a stack of variably-sized, staggered volumes creating numerous terraces that face north towards the East River and west towards Central Park. Fittingly, Heritage has filed permits under the alias “Heritage on the Park LLC,” possibly hinting at the official name for the tower.

More details ahead

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