New Jersey

affordable housing, New Jersey, Policy

Photo of Newark, NJ by Paul Sableman on Flickr

Update 12/10/19: After a long negotiation in federal court on Monday, Newark and New York have agreed to suspend the SOTA Program, Politico reported. “In the spirit of productive conservations and with the goal of moving toward an improved program, we will be temporarily pausing placements in Newark,” de Blasio spokesperson Freddi Goldstein said in a statement. New York City will also send Newark a list of participants of the program and their addresses once an agreement is reached. 

Newark officials are suing New York City and Mayor Bill de Blasio over the city’s controversial Special One-Time Assistance (SOTA) Program that provides homeless shelter residents with free rent for a year if they leave NYC. More than 2,200 families have been placed in 62 New Jersey cities through the program, with over half ending up in Newark. Recent investigations have found that some families end up in “illegal and uninhabitable” apartments and are essentially forced to become dependent on Newark social services. The lawsuit was filed in federal court Monday, as NJ.com first reported, just weeks after Newark passed a law to make the program illegal and ban landlords from taking more than a month’s worth of subsidized rent.

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New Jersey, Policy

The Jersey City waterfront, via Pixabay

A big-money battle between Airbnb and the hotel industry may leave small hosts stranded after a decisive vote in Jersey City Tuesday. Voters in New Jersey’s second-largest city faced a referendum on new, beefed-up regulations on short-term rentals intended to limit the reach of Airbnb and other home-stay companies. According to the New York Times, voters overwhelmingly decided in favor of a law that will require owners of short-term rental properties to get a permit from the city, put a cap on the size and number of units that can be used for short term rental purposes, and limit short-stay rentals to a maximum of 60 days a year if the owner is not physically on-site. The ordinance also bars all renters from using their units as short-term rentals.

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New Developments, New Jersey

Renderings courtesy of Triple Five/ American Dream.

As 6sqft reported in July, the three-million-square-foot American Dream mega-mall with an indoor water park, amusement rides, and a ski slope adjacent East Rutherford, New Jersey’s Met Life Stadium, had announced an October 25 opening. Now, after what may add up to $1 billion in taxpayer incentives, the mall that was formerly known as Xanadu is open, the New York Times reports. The opening may disappoint anyone waiting to shop: The property’s owner, Canadian real estate firm Triple Five Group, says the mall’s first phase consists of an ice-skating rink, a Nickelodeon amusement park, and regular “slime” shows–with the rest to come in subsequent “chapters.”

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New Jersey, Policy, Transportation

Photo by Ken on Flickr

A 109-year-old swing bridge will no longer be the bain of commuters’ existence. The United States Coast Guard agreed last week to permanently restrict when boats can pass under the Portal Bridge, which carries about 200,000 passengers daily to and from Penn Station via New Jersey Transit and Amtrak. The 1910 bridge’s aging mechanics frequently malfunction while opening and closing for maritime traffic, causing hourslong delays, felt especially during rush hour.

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Cool Listings, Historic Homes, New Jersey

Landmarked ‘castle’ in NJ relists for $39M

By Devin Gannon, Tue, September 24, 2019

crocker mansion, darlington mansion, cool listings

Photo courtesy of Christie’s International Real Estate

An English-style castle in New Jersey has returned to the market, offering potential buyers the chance to feel like royalty near the Ramapo Mountains. Asking $39 million, the three-story Darlington Mansion sits on over 12 acres in Mahwah and contains 58 rooms. Constructed in 1907 by George Crocker, the son of railroad baron Charles Crocker, the estate has been modernly restored over the last decade, all while retaining original materials and architectural elements. The mansion, also known as the Crocker Mansion, last listed in 2017 for $48 million.

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New Jersey, Transportation

Photo courtesy of Via

Commuters in Jersey City will soon be able to hail a city bus from their smartphones. In a partnership with ride-sharing app Via, the city will launch on-demand bus service as an alternative to often delayed-plagued New Jersey Transit, Mayor Steven Fulop announced Thursday. Passengers can request a shared trip using Via’s app and then will be given a “virtual” bus stop within walking distance from both pickup and drop-off locations.

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New Developments, New Jersey

The first images of the finished Walker House in Downtown Newark have been released, giving us a peek inside the restored Art Deco masterpiece at 540 Broad Street. Designed by renowned architect Ralph Walker in 1929 as the corporate headquarters for the Bell Telephone Company and entered into the National Historic Register in 2005, the 21-story building has been redeveloped into a mixed-use building comprised of 264 apartments (a mix of market-rate and affordable units), amenities, offices, and retail space, including a brewery, a coffee shop, and Newark’s first climbing wall.

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Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Interviews, New Jersey, real estate trends

Photo of Asbury Park’s Convention Hall by Acroterion / Wikimedia Commons

If you lived along the Jersey Shore in the ’80s and ’90s, Asbury Park was not a place you went. After getting its start in the late 1800s as a summer escape for wealthy residents of NYC and Philly, the 1.6-square-mile town boomed again in the ’50s and ’60s as a grungey, artsy hangout. But after the race riots in the 1970s, the town fell into disrepair and was forgotten by local stakeholders. Fast forward to today, and Asbury is booming–we once aptly described it as “Williamsburg meets Bruce Springsteen-land meets Venice Beach.”

Like many gentrifying/revitalized areas, the change can be attributed to a developer with foresight. In this case, the team at iStar realized the opportunity nine years ago. They now own 35 acres of land in Asbury, including 70 percent of the waterfront, and are investing more than $1 billion in the town. Their projects include the luxury condo Monroe, the renovated Asbury Lanes bowling alley/performance venue, The Asbury Hotel, and, most recently, the Asbury Ocean Club, a hotel-condo hybrid that made headlines for its $1,050/night suite. Unsurprisingly, iStar has received its share of criticism, but that hasn’t stopped New Yorkers from flooding the seaside city in the summertime. Ahead, we delve into the social and cultural landscape of Asbury and talk with iStar’s Brian Cheripka about the lesser-known politics behind their plans, why they decided to invest in Asbury Park, and what we can expect to see in the future.

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condos, Hotels, New Developments, New Jersey

Photo by Nikolas Koenig

A slice of New York City luxury moved to the Jersey Shore last week. The Asbury Ocean Club, a 17-story hotel-condo, officially opened its doors on the boardwalk of Asbury Park, an evolving seaside community in Monmouth County. The 54-room hotel occupies the building’s fourth floor, overlooking both the ocean and pool deck. Marketed as just a 70 minute-drive from NYC, the Asbury Ocean Club hopes to attract New Yorkers with its proximity and its prices. During peak season, rooms start at an introductory rate of $425 per night and go up to more than $1,050 per night for a penthouse suite. In the winter, rooms are offered as low as $195 per night, according to the hotel’s website.

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New Developments, New Jersey

Renderings courtesy of Triple Five/ American Dream

The mega-mall that has been in the works for over 16 years officially has an opening date, as NJ.com reported. On October 25, American Dream, the three-million-square-foot venue with an indoor water park, amusement rides, and ski slope, will finally open its doors, developer Triple Five announced Wednesday. New Jersey first signed a deal in 2003 with developers for the Met Life Stadium-adjacent site, but financial issues halted construction on and off for more than a decade.

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