East Village

affordable housing, East Village, housing lotteries

500-524 East 14th Street, Target, Extell Development

Rendering via Extell Development

An Extell Development rental building in the East Village is now accepting applications for 50 newly constructed, middle-income units. Not only does the chic building at 524 East 14th Street boast amenities like a fitness center, pool and rooftop deck, it will also have a two-level Target, the chain’s first location in the neighborhood. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 70 and 130 percent of the area median income can apply for units ranging from $1,114/studios to $2,733/month two-bedrooms.

Find out if you quality

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East Village, Features, GVSHP, History

How an East Village building went from gangster hangout to Andy Warhol’s Electric Circus

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, February 1, 2018

Google Street View of 19-25 St. Mark’s Place today

Fifty years ago this week, the Velvet Underground released their second album, “White Light/White Heat.” Their darkest record, it was also arguably the Velvet’s most influential, inspiring a generation of alternative musicians with the noisy, distorted sound with which the band came to be so closely identified.

Perhaps the place with which the Velvets have come to be most closely identified is the Electric Circus, the Andy Warhol-run East Village discotheque where they performed as the house band as part of a multi-media experience known as the “Exploding Plastic Inevitable.” Many New Yorkers would be surprised to discover that the space the club once occupied at 19-25 St. Mark’s Place has since been home to a Chipotle and a Supercuts. But the history of the building that launched the career of the godfathers of punk is full of more twists, turns, and ups and downs than one the Velvet’s extended distorted jams that once reverberated within its walls.

The whole history right here

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East Village, Features, GVSHP, History

From house of worship to NYU dorm: The story of the East Village’s ‘ghost church’

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, January 18, 2018

The site in 1975, via MCNY (L); Today, via Mike Licht/Flickr (R)

The disembodied church steeple sitting in front of a 26-story NYU dorm on East 12th Street between 3rd and 4th Avenues makes for one of the more head-scratching sights in New York. This jarring juxtaposition results from a confluence of powerful New York forces, including religion, immigration, real estate, and the expanding appetite of one large institution, New York University, and the shrinking resources of another, the United States Postal Service.

The whole story right here

Cool Listings, East Village, Interiors

634 east 14th street, co-op, east village, real direct, east village studio

Studio living in this East Village apartment comes with some perks. It’s been fully renovated and boasts bonus storage, like a walk-in closet and reserved space in the building’s basement. This cooperative at 634 East 14th Street also offers a bike garage and private garden for residents. The cute pad, finished with exposed brick, crown moldings and maple hardwood floors, is now listed for $499,000 after being taken off the market last year with an ask of $525,000.

Take a tour

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East Village, Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, History, West Village 

What lies below: NYC’s forgotten and hidden graveyards

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, December 21, 2017

Zoom of the 1852 Dripps map of Manhattan, showing the proximity of downtown cemeteries, via David Rumsey Map Collection

Most New Yorkers spend some time underground every day as part of their daily commute, but some spend eternity beneath our streets, and in a few cases occupy some pretty surprising real estate.

Manhattan cemeteries are tougher to get into than Minetta Tavern without a reservation on a Saturday night because as far back as 1823, New York forbade new burials south of Canal Street. In 1851 that prohibition was extended to new burials south of 86th Street, and the creation of new cemeteries anywhere on the island was banned. But thousands of people were buried in Manhattan before those restrictions went into effect. And while some gravesites remain carefully maintained and hallowed ground, such as the those at St. Mark’s in the Bowery Church on Stuyvesant Street, Trinity Church on Wall Street, and St Paul’s Church at Fulton and Broadway, others have been forgotten and overlaid with some pretty surprising new uses, including playgrounds, swimming pools, luxury condos, and even a hotel named for the current occupant of the White House.

Read more

East Village, New Developments

500-524 East 14th Street, Target, Extell Development

Rendering via Extell Development

With construction wrapping up, Extell Development’s two-tower rental complex on 500 and 524 East 14th Street got new renderings this week, revealing luxury amenities and ground-floor retail, including Target, the store’s first East Village location. Opening in July, the popular chain will sit in one building of Extell Development’s complex, which was designed by Beyer Blinder Belle. According to CityRealty, the “flexible format” Target will span 9,649 square feet on the ground floor and 17,705 square feet in the cellar of 500 East 14th Street. The development will also include 160 total new rental apartments, with 32 set aside for low-, moderate- and middle-income households.

Find out more

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East Village, Features, GVSHP, History

Jewish gangsters, jazz legends, and Joy Division: The evolution of the Ukrainian National Home

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, November 16, 2017

The Stuyvesant Casino in 1945, via the Swedish Buck Johnson Society (L); The Ukrainian National Home Today, via Wally Gobetz/Flickr (R)

On 2nd Avenue, just south of 9th Street at No. 140-142, sits one of the East Village’s oddest structures.  Clad in metal and adorned with Cyrillic lettering, the building sports a slightly downtrodden and forbidding look, seeming dropped into the neighborhood from some dystopian sci-fi thriller.

In reality, for the last half century the building has housed the Ukrainian National Home, best known as a great place to get some good food or drink. But scratch the surface of this architectural oddity and you’ll find a winding history replete with Jewish gangsters, German teetotalers, jazz-playing hipsters, and the American debut of one of Britain’s premier post-punk bands, all in a building which, under its metallic veneer, dates back nearly two centuries.

Learn this fascinating history

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East Village, Features, Greenwich Village, GVSHP, Historic Homes, History, West Village 

Artist aeries: Touring downtown’s ‘studio windows’

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, November 9, 2017

Artist’s studios on Bleecker Street, via GVSHP

With fall’s arrival and the turning back of the clocks, sunlight becomes an ever more precious commodity. Perhaps no New York living space is more centered around capturing and maximizing that prized amenity than the artist’s studio, with its large casement windows and tall ceilings. So with sunlight at a premium, let’s conduct a brief survey of some of the most iconic artist’s studio windows in the Village and East Village.

But first, a little history

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Art, East Village, Features, GVSHP, History

‘The Alamo’ turns 50: A history of the Astor Place cube

By Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Thu, November 2, 2017

1980s photo of the Alamo surrounded by mural, vendors, & musicians. © Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation Image Archive.

On November 1, 1967, an enigmatic 20-foot-tall cube first appeared on a lonely traffic island where Astor Place and 8th Street meet. Though several months before the release of “2001: A Space Odyssey,” the one-ton Cor-Ten steel sculpture shared many qualities with the sci-fi classic’s inscrutable “black monolith,” at once both opaque and impenetrable and yet strangely compelling, drawing passersby to touch or interact with it to unlock its mysteries.

Fifty years later, Tony Rosenthal’s “Alamo” sculpture remains a beloved fixture in downtown New York. Like 2001’s monolith, it has witnessed a great deal of change, and yet continues to draw together the myriad people and communities which intersect at this location.

Learn about the cube’s entire 50-year legacy

Cool Listings, East Village, Interiors

Beginning in 2006, the conversion of a boarded-up brownstone at 224 East 14th street has been too fascinating to avoid headlines. The features that make the four-unit “Brownstone East Village” so noteworthy: on the second floor, a facade of honeycomb-patterned aluminum with a brownstone veneer can be automatically retracted to bare the home’s interiors to the bustling traffic of 14th Street just outside. At the rear, a glass- and steel-paneled garage door raises to open the kitchen onto the open air of an urban lawn. The project’s architect, Bill Peterson, moved into the garden triplex with the retractable facade screen and garage doors; Philadelphia developer Alon Barzilay purchased the home from Peterson in 2014 for $2.355 million. Now, this traffic-stopping two-bedroom triplex is back on the market asking $4.2 million.

Check it out, this way

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